Cannes Adds Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote,’ Lars von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built’

Terry Gilliam’s notoriously long-in-the-works “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” will close next month’s Cannes Film Festival, president Pierre Lescure announced Thursday.

In addition, festival organizers confirmed that Lars von Trier’s “The House That Jack Built,” a serial killer drama starring Matt Dillon and Uma Thurman, would screen out of competition.

On Tuesday, festival general delegate Thierry Fremaux had signaled that the Danish director would be welcomed back to the festival seven years after he was declared “persona non grata” at the festival for comments he made about Adolf Hitler.

Also Read: Ava DuVernay, Kristen Stewart Join Cate Blanchett on 2018 Cannes Film Festival Jury

Three films were also added to the competition lineup, bringing the total to 21 films vying for this year’s Palme d’Or: French director Yann Gonzalez’s “Un couteau dans le coeur (Knife + Heart)” starring Vanessa Paradis; Kazakh filmmaker Sergey Dvortsevoy’s “Ayka;” and Turkish director and 2014 Palmed’Or winner Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s “Ahlat Agaci (The Wild Pear Tree).”

In addition, Kevin Macdonald’s “Whitney,” a doc about the late pop star Whitney Houston, will join the Midnight Screenings series, along with Ramin Bahrani’s adaptation of Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” starring Michael B. Jordan, Michael Shannon, and Sofia Boutella.

Also Read: Cannes Will Welcome Back Lars von Trier, Says Festival Director

The festival also added three new films to the Un Certain Regard program: Alejandro Fadel’s “Muere, Monstruo, Muere;” João Salaviza and Renée Nader Messora’s “Chuva E Cantoria Na Aldeia Dos Mortos (The Dead and the Others)” and Ukranian director Sergey Loznitsa’s “Donbass.”

This year’s festival runs from May 8 to May 19.

 

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Ava DuVernay, Kristen Stewart Join Cate Blanchett on 2018 Cannes Film Festival Jury

Debra Granik, Gaspar Noe Films Selected for Cannes’ Directors’ Fortnight Lineup

Cannes Will Welcome Back Lars von Trier, Says Festival Director

Majority of Cannes Critics’ Week Competition Films Were Directed by Women

Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

Terry Gilliam’s notoriously long-in-the-works “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” will close next month’s Cannes Film Festival, president Pierre Lescure announced Thursday.

In addition, festival organizers confirmed that Lars von Trier’s “The House That Jack Built,” a serial killer drama starring Matt Dillon and Uma Thurman, would screen out of competition.

On Tuesday, festival general delegate Thierry Fremaux had signaled that the Danish director would be welcomed back to the festival seven years after he was declared “persona non grata” at the festival for comments he made about Adolf Hitler.

Three films were also added to the competition lineup, bringing the total to 21 films vying for this year’s Palme d’Or: French director Yann Gonzalez’s “Un couteau dans le coeur (Knife + Heart)” starring Vanessa Paradis; Kazakh filmmaker Sergey Dvortsevoy’s “Ayka;” and Turkish director and 2014 Palmed’Or winner Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s “Ahlat Agaci (The Wild Pear Tree).”

In addition, Kevin Macdonald’s “Whitney,” a doc about the late pop star Whitney Houston, will join the Midnight Screenings series, along with Ramin Bahrani’s adaptation of Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” starring Michael B. Jordan, Michael Shannon, and Sofia Boutella.

The festival also added three new films to the Un Certain Regard program: Alejandro Fadel’s “Muere, Monstruo, Muere;” João Salaviza and Renée Nader Messora’s “Chuva E Cantoria Na Aldeia Dos Mortos (The Dead and the Others)” and Ukranian director Sergey Loznitsa’s “Donbass.”

This year’s festival runs from May 8 to May 19.

 

Related stories from TheWrap:

Ava DuVernay, Kristen Stewart Join Cate Blanchett on 2018 Cannes Film Festival Jury

Debra Granik, Gaspar Noe Films Selected for Cannes' Directors' Fortnight Lineup

Cannes Will Welcome Back Lars von Trier, Says Festival Director

Majority of Cannes Critics' Week Competition Films Were Directed by Women

Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

Debra Granik, Gaspar Noe Films Selected for Cannes’ Directors’ Fortnight Lineup

Debra Granik, Romain Gavras, Ciro Guerra and Gaspar Noe are among the directors whose films will be included in the 50th Directors’ Fortnight, an independent sidebar that will run concurrently with the Cannes Film Festival in May.

Granik will go to Cannes with “Leave No Trace,” her first narrative film since the Oscar-nominated “Winter’s Bone” in 2010, and a film that received strong reviews when it premiered at Sundance in January.

Gavras, best known for his videos for M.I.A., Kanye West and Jay-Z and others, will be there with “Le monde est a toi,” while Guerra and his co-director Cristina Gallego, who made the Oscar-nominated “Embrace of the Serpent,” will bring “Birds of Passage” to Directors’ Fortnight.

The Argentinian provocateur Noe will bring “Climax” to the festival.

Also in the selection: Panos Cosmatos’ horror film “Mandy,” which features what is reportedly another wild performance from Nicolas Cage.

Directors’ Fortnight (Quinzaine des Realisateurs) was established in 1969, in the aftermath of a 1968 Cannes Film Festival that was cancelled midway through in solidarity with the protests sweeping through France. It was set up to offer a more daring and experimental slate than the main festival, and over the years provided the first Cannes exposure for such directors as Martin Scorsese, Werner Herzog, Michael Haneke and Spike Lee.

Also Read: Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

Directors’ Fortnight will open on May 9 and run through May 19.

The lineup:

“Pajaros de verano” (“Birds of Passage”), Ciro Guerra and Cristina Gallego (opening film)
“Amin,” Philippe Faucon
“Carmen Y Lola,” Arantxa Echevarria
“Climax,” Gaspar Noe
“Comprama un revolver,” Julio Hernandez Cordon
“Les Confins du Monde,” Guillaume Nicloux
“El motoarrebatador,” Augustin Toscano
“En Liberte,” Pierre Salvador
“Joueurs,” Marie Monge
“Leave No Trace,” Debra Granik
“Los Silencios,” Beatriz Seigner
“Ming wang xing shi ke,” Ming Zhang
“Mandy,” Panos Cosmatos
“Mirai,” Mamoru Hosoda
“Le monde est a toi,” Romain Gavras
“Petra,” Jaime Rosales
“Samouni Road,” Stefano Savona
“Teret,” Ognjen Glavonic
“Weldi,” Mohamed Ben Attia
“Troppa Grazia,” Gianni Zanasi (closing film)

Short films:
“Basses,” Felix Imbert
“Ce Magnifique gateau” (“This Magnificent Cake”), Emma De Swaef & Marc Roels
“La Lotta,” Marco Belocchio
“Las Cruces,” Nicolas Boone
“La nuit des sacs plastiques,” Gabriel Harel
“O orfao,” Carolina Markowicz
“Our Song to War,” Juanita Onzaga
“Skip Day,” Patrick Bresnan & Ivette Lucas
“Le Sujet,” Patrick Bouchard

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Majority of Cannes Critics’ Week Competition Films Were Directed by Women

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Debra Granik, Romain Gavras, Ciro Guerra and Gaspar Noe are among the directors whose films will be included in the 50th Directors’ Fortnight, an independent sidebar that will run concurrently with the Cannes Film Festival in May.

Granik will go to Cannes with “Leave No Trace,” her first narrative film since the Oscar-nominated “Winter’s Bone” in 2010, and a film that received strong reviews when it premiered at Sundance in January.

Gavras, best known for his videos for M.I.A., Kanye West and Jay-Z and others, will be there with “Le monde est a toi,” while Guerra and his co-director Cristina Gallego, who made the Oscar-nominated “Embrace of the Serpent,” will bring “Birds of Passage” to Directors’ Fortnight.

The Argentinian provocateur Noe will bring “Climax” to the festival.

Also in the selection: Panos Cosmatos’ horror film “Mandy,” which features what is reportedly another wild performance from Nicolas Cage.

Directors’ Fortnight (Quinzaine des Realisateurs) was established in 1969, in the aftermath of a 1968 Cannes Film Festival that was cancelled midway through in solidarity with the protests sweeping through France. It was set up to offer a more daring and experimental slate than the main festival, and over the years provided the first Cannes exposure for such directors as Martin Scorsese, Werner Herzog, Michael Haneke and Spike Lee.

Directors’ Fortnight will open on May 9 and run through May 19.

The lineup:

“Pajaros de verano” (“Birds of Passage”), Ciro Guerra and Cristina Gallego (opening film)
“Amin,” Philippe Faucon
“Carmen Y Lola,” Arantxa Echevarria
“Climax,” Gaspar Noe
“Comprama un revolver,” Julio Hernandez Cordon
“Les Confins du Monde,” Guillaume Nicloux
“El motoarrebatador,” Augustin Toscano
“En Liberte,” Pierre Salvador
“Joueurs,” Marie Monge
“Leave No Trace,” Debra Granik
“Los Silencios,” Beatriz Seigner
“Ming wang xing shi ke,” Ming Zhang
“Mandy,” Panos Cosmatos
“Mirai,” Mamoru Hosoda
“Le monde est a toi,” Romain Gavras
“Petra,” Jaime Rosales
“Samouni Road,” Stefano Savona
“Teret,” Ognjen Glavonic
“Weldi,” Mohamed Ben Attia
“Troppa Grazia,” Gianni Zanasi (closing film)

Short films:
“Basses,” Felix Imbert
“Ce Magnifique gateau” (“This Magnificent Cake”), Emma De Swaef & Marc Roels
“La Lotta,” Marco Belocchio
“Las Cruces,” Nicolas Boone
“La nuit des sacs plastiques,” Gabriel Harel
“O orfao,” Carolina Markowicz
“Our Song to War,” Juanita Onzaga
“Skip Day,” Patrick Bresnan & Ivette Lucas
“Le Sujet,” Patrick Bouchard

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Will Welcome Back Lars von Trier, Says Festival Director

Majority of Cannes Critics' Week Competition Films Were Directed by Women

Netflix Bails on Cannes Over Theatrical Release Mandate

Cannes Will Welcome Back Lars von Trier, Says Festival Director

Director Lars von Trier, who was declared “persona non grata” at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival for comments he made about Adolph Hitler, will return to Cannes for the first time since then, festival general delegate Thierry Fremaux said on French radio on Tuesday.

Von Trier’s “The House That Jack Built,” the study of a serial killer played by Matt Dillon, has long been rumored to be a contender for a slot at this year’s festival. When asked about that by a French radio host, Fremaux confirmed that Cannes would have a von Trier announcement in the coming days.

When the host pressed him to confirm that the film had been added to the lineup, Fremaux responded, “I sort of did.”

Also Read: Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

“The House That Jack Built” is set in Washington State and covers the life of the killer over a dozen years. Other cast members include Riley Keough, Bruno Ganz and Uma Thurman. IFC acquired U.S. rights to the film in Cannes last May.

Known as a cinematic provocateur, the Danish director caused a furor at Cannes in 2011 when his film “Melancholia” screened in the main competition. Asked at a press conference to discuss his German roots and his interest in the Nazi aesthetic, he began a long and rambling answer by saying, “I thought I was a Jew for a long time, and I was very happy… But it turned out that I was not a Jew…

“And then I found out that I was really a Nazi, because my family was German. Which also gave me some pleasure. What can I say?”

Also Read: Lars von Trier Denies Björk’s Sexual Harassment Claims

As the film’s star, Kirsten Dunst, pleaded with von Trier to stop talking, he added, “I understand Hitler. I think he did some wrong things, absolutely, but I can see him sitting in his bunker at the end. I think I understand the man. He’s not what you call a good guy, but I understand much about him, and I sympathize with him a little bit.”

While von Trier quickly issued a formal apology for the comments, he was banned from the rest of the festival and declared “persona non grata,” though “Melancholia” remained in the official competition. (Dunst won the festival’s best actress award.)

The director’s next film, the two-part 2013 drama “Nymphomaniac,” did not screen in Cannes. But Fremaux has in recent years said that he was open to having von Trier return to the festival, and in Tuesday’s interview he said that festival president Pierre Lescure has been working to lift the director’s “persona non grata” status.

Fremaux also said that Russian director Andrey Zvyagintsev, who was in competition at Cannes last year with “Loveless,” will serve on the jury this year. The rest of the jury, which will be headed by Cate Blanchett, has yet to be announced.

Ben Croll contributed to this report.

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‘Nymphomaniac’ Reviews: Is Lars von Triers’ Latest Sexy or Stupid?

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Director Lars von Trier, who was declared “persona non grata” at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival for comments he made about Adolph Hitler, will return to Cannes for the first time since then, festival general delegate Thierry Fremaux said on French radio on Tuesday.

Von Trier’s “The House That Jack Built,” the study of a serial killer played by Matt Dillon, has long been rumored to be a contender for a slot at this year’s festival. When asked about that by a French radio host, Fremaux confirmed that Cannes would have a von Trier announcement in the coming days.

When the host pressed him to confirm that the film had been added to the lineup, Fremaux responded, “I sort of did.”

“The House That Jack Built” is set in Washington State and covers the life of the killer over a dozen years. Other cast members include Riley Keough, Bruno Ganz and Uma Thurman. IFC acquired U.S. rights to the film in Cannes last May.

Known as a cinematic provocateur, the Danish director caused a furor at Cannes in 2011 when his film “Melancholia” screened in the main competition. Asked at a press conference to discuss his German roots and his interest in the Nazi aesthetic, he began a long and rambling answer by saying, “I thought I was a Jew for a long time, and I was very happy… But it turned out that I was not a Jew…

“And then I found out that I was really a Nazi, because my family was German. Which also gave me some pleasure. What can I say?”

As the film’s star, Kirsten Dunst, pleaded with von Trier to stop talking, he added, “I understand Hitler. I think he did some wrong things, absolutely, but I can see him sitting in his bunker at the end. I think I understand the man. He’s not what you call a good guy, but I understand much about him, and I sympathize with him a little bit.”

While von Trier quickly issued a formal apology for the comments, he was banned from the rest of the festival and declared “persona non grata,” though “Melancholia” remained in the official competition. (Dunst won the festival’s best actress award.)

The director’s next film, the two-part 2013 drama “Nymphomaniac,” did not screen in Cannes. But Fremaux has in recent years said that he was open to having von Trier return to the festival, and in Tuesday’s interview he said that festival president Pierre Lescure has been working to lift the director’s “persona non grata” status.

Fremaux also said that Russian director Andrey Zvyagintsev, who was in competition at Cannes last year with “Loveless,” will serve on the jury this year. The rest of the jury, which will be headed by Cate Blanchett, has yet to be announced.

Ben Croll contributed to this report.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Lars Von Trier's Serial Killer Movie 'The House That Jack Built' Lands at IFC Films

'Nymphomaniac' Reviews: Is Lars von Triers' Latest Sexy or Stupid?

Lars von Trier is an Idiot, and Other Lessons We Learned at Cannes

Majority of Cannes Critics’ Week Competition Films Were Directed by Women

In what is believed to be a first, the French Union of Film Critics selected a majority of films by female directors for competition in the International Critics’ Week sidebar at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival.

The seven competition titles in Critics’ Week, announced Monday, will include four directed by women: Agnieszka Smoczynska’s “Fugue” (pictured above),  Anja Kofmel’s “Chris the Swiss,” Rohena Gera’s “Sir” and Sofia Szilagyi’s “One Day.”

They will compete against Benedikt Erlingsson’s “Kona Fer I Strid” (Woman at War”), Camille Vidal-Naquet’s “Sauvage,” and Gabriel Abrantes & Daniel Schmidt’s “Diamantino.”

“Wildlife,” Paul Dano’s adaptation of a Richard Ford novel starring Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal, will open the sidebar in a special screening. The film, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January, is the only American film chosen.

Also Read: Paul Dano’s ‘Wildlife

Guillaume Senez’s “Our Struggles” will also be presented as a special screening, while Alex Katz’s “Guy” will close the section.

Critics’ Week is run independently of the main festival but takes place concurrently. The selection is devoted to first and second films from new directors — and its directorial debuts, including “Wildlife,” are eligible for Cannes’ Camera d’Or for the festival’s best first film.

International Critics’ Week (Semaine de la Critique) is organized by the French Union of Film Critics, which is made up of 244 critics, writers and journalists. The oldest parallel section to the Cannes Film Festival, it began in 1962.

Also Read: Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

The winners will be chosen by a jury headed by Danish director Joachim Trier and also including American actress Chloe Sevigny, Argentinian actor Nahuel Perez Biscayart, festival programmer Eva Sangiori and French journalist Augustin Trapenard.

Critics’ Week also announced 10 short films in competition, three of them by female directors.

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In what is believed to be a first, the French Union of Film Critics selected a majority of films by female directors for competition in the International Critics’ Week sidebar at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival.

The seven competition titles in Critics’ Week, announced Monday, will include four directed by women: Agnieszka Smoczynska’s “Fugue” (pictured above),  Anja Kofmel’s “Chris the Swiss,” Rohena Gera’s “Sir” and Sofia Szilagyi’s “One Day.”

They will compete against Benedikt Erlingsson’s “Kona Fer I Strid” (Woman at War”), Camille Vidal-Naquet’s “Sauvage,” and Gabriel Abrantes & Daniel Schmidt’s “Diamantino.”

“Wildlife,” Paul Dano’s adaptation of a Richard Ford novel starring Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal, will open the sidebar in a special screening. The film, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January, is the only American film chosen.

Guillaume Senez’s “Our Struggles” will also be presented as a special screening, while Alex Katz’s “Guy” will close the section.

Critics’ Week is run independently of the main festival but takes place concurrently. The selection is devoted to first and second films from new directors — and its directorial debuts, including “Wildlife,” are eligible for Cannes’ Camera d’Or for the festival’s best first film.

International Critics’ Week (Semaine de la Critique) is organized by the French Union of Film Critics, which is made up of 244 critics, writers and journalists. The oldest parallel section to the Cannes Film Festival, it began in 1962.

The winners will be chosen by a jury headed by Danish director Joachim Trier and also including American actress Chloe Sevigny, Argentinian actor Nahuel Perez Biscayart, festival programmer Eva Sangiori and French journalist Augustin Trapenard.

Critics’ Week also announced 10 short films in competition, three of them by female directors.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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Paul Dano’s ‘Wildlife” Headed to Cannes in Critics’ Week Selection

“Wildlife,” Paul Dano’s adaptation of a Richard Ford novel starring Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal, has been chosen to screen in the International Critics’ Week sidebar at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival.

Critics’ Week is run independently of the main festival but takes place concurrently. The selection is devoted to first and second films from new directors — and its directorial debuts, including “Wildlife,” are eligible for Cannes’ Camera d’Or for the festival’s best first film.

“Wildlife” debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in January, where it won positive reviews and was acquired by IFC Films. The only American film screening in Critics’ Week, it will be presented as a special opening-night screening in the sidebar.

Also Read: ‘Wildlife’ Review: Paul Dano’s Directorial Debut Is an Austere Portrait of a Family in Crisis

 

International Critics’ Week (Semaine de la Critique) is organized by the French Union of Film Critics, which is made up of 244 critics, writers and journalists. The oldest parallel section to the Cannes Film Festival, it began in 1962.

The winners will be chosen by a jury headed by Danish director Joachim Trier and also including American actress Chloe Sevigny, Argentinian actor Nahuel Perez Biscayart, festival programmer Eva Sangiori and French journalist Augustin Trapenard.

Filmmakers who first screened in Cannes as part of Critics’ Week include Bernardo Bertolucci, Ken Loach, Guillermo del Toro, Jacques Audiard and Alejandro G. Inarritu.

The other main sidebar that runs concurrently with the festival, Directors’ Fortnight, will announce its lineup on Tuesday.

This year’s Cannes Film Festival will run from May 8 through May 19.

More to come.

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“Wildlife,” Paul Dano’s adaptation of a Richard Ford novel starring Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal, has been chosen to screen in the International Critics’ Week sidebar at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival.

Critics’ Week is run independently of the main festival but takes place concurrently. The selection is devoted to first and second films from new directors — and its directorial debuts, including “Wildlife,” are eligible for Cannes’ Camera d’Or for the festival’s best first film.

“Wildlife” debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in January, where it won positive reviews and was acquired by IFC Films. The only American film screening in Critics’ Week, it will be presented as a special opening-night screening in the sidebar.

 

International Critics’ Week (Semaine de la Critique) is organized by the French Union of Film Critics, which is made up of 244 critics, writers and journalists. The oldest parallel section to the Cannes Film Festival, it began in 1962.

The winners will be chosen by a jury headed by Danish director Joachim Trier and also including American actress Chloe Sevigny, Argentinian actor Nahuel Perez Biscayart, festival programmer Eva Sangiori and French journalist Augustin Trapenard.

Filmmakers who first screened in Cannes as part of Critics’ Week include Bernardo Bertolucci, Ken Loach, Guillermo del Toro, Jacques Audiard and Alejandro G. Inarritu.

The other main sidebar that runs concurrently with the festival, Directors’ Fortnight, will announce its lineup on Tuesday.

This year’s Cannes Film Festival will run from May 8 through May 19.

More to come.

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'You Were Never Really Here' Rides Cannes Praise to Big Indie Box Office Start

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Netflix Bails on Cannes Over Theatrical Release Mandate

Netflix will not submit its original films to this year’s Cannes Film Festival, following a 2017 mandate that all eligible titles must get a theatrical release in France to be included in the festival’s main competition, TheWrap has learned.

Netflix’s prospective competition titles included Jeremy Saulnier’s Jeffrey Wright drama “Hold the Dark,” Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” and potentially David Mackenzie’s Chris Pine period drama “Outlaw King.” Paul Greengrass’ “Norway” is also on the horizon at the streaming service, though not all are thought to be completed or ready for screening.

The company also had Orson Welles’ “The Other Side of the Wind” — a film the legendary director never finished before his death in 1985. Netflix did it for him, with some change they found in the couch.

The entry would have been a lock for Cannes Classics category, along with Morgan Neville’s documentary about their completing it.

The Cannes rule requiring a French theatrical release did not apply to out-of-competition sections like Cannes Classics, and Netflix could have submitted its films for consideration in those sections. But it opted not to do so.

Also Read: Netflix Announces Acquisition of Seth Rogen – All of Him (Video)

News of Netflix’s withdrawal was first reported in a Variety Q&A with Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos. A Netflix spokesperson would not comment further.

Representatives from Netflix’s feature film acquisitions team are expected to attend the festival, according to an individual familiar with their plans, thought it’s unclear if film division head Scott Stuber will be among the attendees.

The prestigious festival made its rule change following protests from European theater owners, who hit the ceiling last year when Netflix strutted titles like Tilda Swinton’s “Okja” in the main competition despite the company’s plans to only stream the film on its digital service and bypass a traditional theatrical release.

“Netflix has been avoiding French regulation and fiscal obligations. These rules allow for the financing of our strong film industry and ecosystem which in turns allows for many French and foreign movies selected at Cannes to get made,” French theater owners said in a joint statement at the time.

Steve Pond contributed to this report.

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Netflix will not submit its original films to this year’s Cannes Film Festival, following a 2017 mandate that all eligible titles must get a theatrical release in France to be included in the festival’s main competition, TheWrap has learned.

Netflix’s prospective competition titles included Jeremy Saulnier’s Jeffrey Wright drama “Hold the Dark,” Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” and potentially David Mackenzie’s Chris Pine period drama “Outlaw King.” Paul Greengrass’ “Norway” is also on the horizon at the streaming service, though not all are thought to be completed or ready for screening.

The company also had Orson Welles’ “The Other Side of the Wind” — a film the legendary director never finished before his death in 1985. Netflix did it for him, with some change they found in the couch.

The entry would have been a lock for Cannes Classics category, along with Morgan Neville’s documentary about their completing it.

The Cannes rule requiring a French theatrical release did not apply to out-of-competition sections like Cannes Classics, and Netflix could have submitted its films for consideration in those sections. But it opted not to do so.

News of Netflix’s withdrawal was first reported in a Variety Q&A with Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos. A Netflix spokesperson would not comment further.

Representatives from Netflix’s feature film acquisitions team are expected to attend the festival, according to an individual familiar with their plans, thought it’s unclear if film division head Scott Stuber will be among the attendees.

The prestigious festival made its rule change following protests from European theater owners, who hit the ceiling last year when Netflix strutted titles like Tilda Swinton’s “Okja” in the main competition despite the company’s plans to only stream the film on its digital service and bypass a traditional theatrical release.

“Netflix has been avoiding French regulation and fiscal obligations. These rules allow for the financing of our strong film industry and ecosystem which in turns allows for many French and foreign movies selected at Cannes to get made,” French theater owners said in a joint statement at the time.

Steve Pond contributed to this report.

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Netflix Threatens to Skip Cannes Film Festival Screenings as Tensions Rise

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‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’ to Premiere at Cannes Film Festival

“Solo: A Star Wars Story” will premiere at the 71st Cannes Film Festival.

The film will premiere in a special screening May 15, before its global premiere on May 25. Deadline first reported the news.

The standalone “Star Wars” film stars Alden Ehrenreich as Han Solo, Donald Glover as Lando Calrissian, “Game of Thrones” actress Emilia Clarke and “Westworld” star Thandie Newton.

Also Read: ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story’ Writer Describes ‘Messy’ Reshoots

Ron Howard took over as director for the film after Phil Lord and Chris Miller left the project, citing creative differences.

Meanwhile, “Everybody Knows,” starring Javier Bardem, Penelope Cruz and Ricardo Darin, will open the 71st Cannes Film Festival, festival organizers announced on Thursday.

Asghar Farhadi directed the psychological thriller, and the film is the second feature that is not in English or French to open the festival after Pedro Almodovar’s “Bad Education” in 2004.

Also Read: Penelope Cruz, Javier Bardem Film ‘Everybody Knows’ to Open Cannes Film Festival

Iranian director Farhadi had two films in the Cannes competition previously — “The Salesman” in 2016 and “The Past” in 2013. “The Salesman” won the Oscar for Best Foreign Film.

The Cannes Opening Ceremony will be held on May 8th and will be broadcast free-to-air by Canal + as well as in partner cinemas and followed by the preview screening of the film in select theaters in France.

The 71st Cannes Film Festival will be held from May 8 to May 19. The competition jury will be headed by Cate Blanchett.

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“Solo: A Star Wars Story” will premiere at the 71st Cannes Film Festival.

The film will premiere in a special screening May 15, before its global premiere on May 25. Deadline first reported the news.

The standalone “Star Wars” film stars Alden Ehrenreich as Han Solo, Donald Glover as Lando Calrissian, “Game of Thrones” actress Emilia Clarke and “Westworld” star Thandie Newton.

Ron Howard took over as director for the film after Phil Lord and Chris Miller left the project, citing creative differences.

Meanwhile, “Everybody Knows,” starring Javier Bardem, Penelope Cruz and Ricardo Darin, will open the 71st Cannes Film Festival, festival organizers announced on Thursday.

Asghar Farhadi directed the psychological thriller, and the film is the second feature that is not in English or French to open the festival after Pedro Almodovar’s “Bad Education” in 2004.

Iranian director Farhadi had two films in the Cannes competition previously — “The Salesman” in 2016 and “The Past” in 2013. “The Salesman” won the Oscar for Best Foreign Film.

The Cannes Opening Ceremony will be held on May 8th and will be broadcast free-to-air by Canal + as well as in partner cinemas and followed by the preview screening of the film in select theaters in France.

The 71st Cannes Film Festival will be held from May 8 to May 19. The competition jury will be headed by Cate Blanchett.

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