Jury Prize Winner Nadine Labaki’s ‘Capernaum’ Captures The Reality Of A Life in Hell For Lebanon’s Invisible Generation – Cannes Studio

Nadine Labaki’s Capernaum premiered in Cannes on the final Thursday of the festival, the last of just three female filmmakers in a competition of 21 films. Though her previous two films, Caramel and Where Do We Go Now?, are both social dramas that deal…

Nadine Labaki's Capernaum premiered in Cannes on the final Thursday of the festival, the last of just three female filmmakers in a competition of 21 films. Though her previous two films, Caramel and Where Do We Go Now?, are both social dramas that deal directly with some of the issues facing her homeland, the Lebanese director's latest reaches a whole new level. Set on the streets in the country's poorest areas, it tells the story of Zain (Zain Al Rafeea), a little boy…

Japanese Director Hirokazu Kore-eda Returns To Exploring Family Dynamics In Surprise Palme D’Or Winner ‘Shoplifters’ – Cannes Studio

After flirting with genre in courtroom drama The Third Murder, which bowed at Venice last year, Japan’s Hirokazu Kore-eda—a regular face at Cannes since the early 2000s—made a return to familiar ground, not to mention a quick turnaround, wi…

After flirting with genre in courtroom drama The Third Murder, which bowed at Venice last year, Japan's Hirokazu Kore-eda—a regular face at Cannes since the early 2000s—made a return to familiar ground, not to mention a quick turnaround, with his new film Shoplifters. Having said that, Shoplifters isn't quite what it appears at first glance: dealing with a family of petty criminals who live on the breadline, it slowly reveals its secrets, gradually building to a…

Jaime Rosales Brings Greek Tragedy To Modern Cinema In Directors’ Fortnight Thriller ‘Petra’ – Cannes Studio

An early hit with festivalgoers who prefer to look outside the Official Selection, Jaime Rosales’s Directors’ Fortnight entry Petra proved the Spanish director to be a fluid and unpredictable talent. Arguably most famous—or perhaps infamous…

An early hit with festivalgoers who prefer to look outside the Official Selection, Jaime Rosales's Directors’ Fortnight entry Petra proved the Spanish director to be a fluid and unpredictable talent. Arguably most famous—or perhaps infamous—for the almost entirely dialogue-free 2008 Basque terrorist drama Bullet in the Head, Rosales this time presents a very subtle mystery-thriller. Sharing DNA with the work of his compatriot Pedro Almodóvar—not least because it features…

Debra Granik On Bringing Sundance Hit ‘Leave No Trace’ To The Screen After An Eight-Year Hiatus – Cannes Studio

Making its international premiere in Directors’ Fortnight, Debra Granik’s acclaimed Sundance title Leave No Trace left many veteran festivalgoers wondering why so many inferior films had managed to leapfrog it into the Official Selection. Told wi…

Making its international premiere in Directors’ Fortnight, Debra Granik's acclaimed Sundance title Leave No Trace left many veteran festivalgoers wondering why so many inferior films had managed to leapfrog it into the Official Selection. Told with great narrative economy, and featuring two sublime performances, the film charts the experiences of a teenage girl (talented newcomer Thomasin McKenzie), who grows tired of the peripatetic lifestyle she leads with her…

Deadline Studio at Cannes 2018 – Part 1 – Michael Shannon, Sofia Boutella, Mads Mikkelsen & More (PHOTOS)

Deadline’s portrait and video studio at the Cannes Film Festival kicked off eight talent-filled days on the Croisette with visits by Arctic director Joe Penna and actors Mads Mikkelsen and Maria Thelma Smaradottir; Michael Shannon and Sofia Boutella fr…

Deadline's portrait and video studio at the Cannes Film Festival kicked off eight talent-filled days on the Croisette with visits by Arctic director Joe Penna and actors Mads Mikkelsen and Maria Thelma Smaradottir; Michael Shannon and Sofia Boutella from HBO’s Fahrenheit 451; and Tahar Rahim from Treat Me Like Fire. Also stopping by the studio for our series of photo sessions and video interviews taking place at VILLA AH were Tom Bernard of Sony Pictures Classics; Pope Fra…

Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Victory Lap Couldn’t Be Stopped By Lawsuits, Health Scares Or The Loss Of Amazon – Cannes Q&A

At the start of Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, a title card appears. “And now, after more than 25 years in the making… and unmaking… a Terry Gilliam film.” The history behind the director’s tortured attempt to adapt M…

At the start of Terry Gilliam's The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, a title card appears. "And now, after more than 25 years in the making… and unmaking… a Terry Gilliam film." The history behind the director’s tortured attempt to adapt Miguel de Cervantes' seminal novel is the stuff of legend, beginning in 1989. He first got it into production in 2000, when Jean Rochefort and Johnny Depp were cast as Don Quixote and his squire Sancho Panza. The derailing of that shoot…

‘Climax’ Director Gaspar Noé Shakes Up The Festival With A Heady Cocktail Of Sex, Drugs And Violence – Cannes Studio

Following in the slipstream of his 2015 3D porno Love, Gaspar Noé’s latest film, Climax, didn’t disappoint fans of the famous iconoclast, who presented it outside the official selection in the Directors’ Fortnight. Set in Paris, it tells the stor…

Following in the slipstream of his 2015 3D porno Love, Gaspar Noé's latest film, Climax, didn't disappoint fans of the famous iconoclast, who presented it outside the official selection in the Directors’ Fortnight. Set in Paris, it tells the story of a rag-tag group of street dancers who gather in a church hall to work on a dance routine together. As soon as they've nailed it, the choreographer treats them to a party—unaware that one of their number has spiked the sangria…