‘Dabka’ Film Review: A Scraggly Evan Peters Teams Up With Barkhad Abdi in Somalia

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The pleasingly self-aware and fast-paced “Dabka” begins with narration by journalist Jay Bahadur (Evan Peters) telling us that he hates movies where the main character narrates because that means that the screenwriters haven’t done their job to make the story work on a visual basis. While that may be true in some cases, “Dabka” itself is a movie where the brash but insecure voice of Bahadur grounds the story we are watching, and this voice also gives it some tension because we are never sure if his over-confidence might lead to disaster.

Based on a true story, “Dabka” begins in 2008 right after Bahadur graduates from college and his high school girlfriend breaks up with him. Unable to find a job, he is still living at home with his parents and doing a tedious marketing job until a chance encounter with the retired journalist Seymour Tolbin (Al Pacino).

Pacino offers the same loopy mentor performance that he has given many times before, but he and Melanie Griffith, who plays Bahadur’s mother, are basically special guest stars in this movie, which is carried by Peters in a high-energy and very appealing performance.

Also Read: Evan Peters Gets Bearded Up in Fact-Based ‘Pirates of Somalia’ Trailer (Video)

Tolbin advises Bahadur to make his name by going to a dangerous place where no other journalist will go, and so Bahadur decides to go to Somalia because major news organizations are not sending reporters to cover a risky Somali pirates story. The spunky and even foolhardy Bahadur has nothing to lose and everything to prove, and “Dabka,” which means “fire” in Somali, traces his sometimes-blundering attempts to get a story and sell a book without unduly sensationalizing a country that he admires.

Bahadur is aided in this effort by his translator, Abdi, who is played by Barkhad Abdi, the actor who made such an impression playing a Somali pirate in “Captain Phillips” with Tom Hanks. This time Abdi plays a man who proudly wears an Obama hat and does everything he can to help Bahadur get a meeting with two of the main players: Boyah (Mohamed Barre), who is thought of as a Robin Hood figure, and the more menacing Garaad (Mohamed Osmail Ibrahim). Both of these men prefer to be known as “coast guards” rather than pirates, and both require the gift of drugs before consenting to an interview.

Bahadur dreams of his ex-girlfriend and starts growing a beard that eventually reaches mountain man length. He tries hard to secure a book deal with the material he is gathering, but he gets turned down with his least favorite rejection letter word, “unfortunately.” (As in, “Unfortunately, we just don’t feel this book is right for us.”) As played by Peters, Bahadur has a kind of nutty desperation about him that makes you worry that he’s going to get himself or someone else hurt.

Also Read: ‘American Horror Story: Cult’: Every Cult Leader Evan Peters Has Played So Far (Photos)

While staring out his window one day, Bahadur sees a very alluring young woman named Maryan (Sabrina Hassan) who sells drugs in the local market, and she looks back at him with a classic “come hither” stare. Maryan is one of Garaad’s wives, which makes her an extra-dangerous woman to pursue, but as usual Bahadur can’t help himself from going after a perilous goal.

As he gazes at Maryan at the market, Bahadur tells us in voiceover that we are not likely to meet our great love but that this likelihood is “enhanced by reckless behavior and naiveté,” and this counts as one of his most attractive moments.

Also Read: Ryan Murphy’s ‘Pose’ Adds Evan Peters, Kate Mara, James Van Der Beek, Tatiana Maslany

“Dabka,” which is well written and directed by Bryan Buckley, bases its narrative on the burgeoning friendship between Bahadur and Abdi and the flirtation between Bahadur and Maryan, who enjoys American movies but dislikes “Black Hawk Down” because she feels it does not do justice to her people.

At one point toward the end of Bahadur’s visit to Somalia he sees a man on a horse with a sword who announces that there is a certain point when “life and prosperity is forbidden to an honorable man,” a concept that you are not likely to hear in the West. “Dabka” winningly traces the ways that a callow American gets schooled in concepts like honor and sacrifice until he is considered an expert on a country and a people that he grows to love.

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Director Bryan Buckley On His Long-Held Fascination With ‘The Pirates Of Somalia’

Read on: Deadline.

Debuting The Pirates of Somalia (previously titled Dabka) at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival, fimmaker Bryan Buckley had been fascinated by the subjects of the film’s title long before helming that project.
“Originally, I had done a short doc for the UN on refugees. I met Somali people in Kenya and I realized that we weren’t getting the proper story from them,” Buckley explains. “We finished this short doc and nobody watched it at all, so I took it upon myself to create…

‘A Girl From Mogadishu’: Aja Naomi King Leads Female Empowerment Story – AFM

Read on: Deadline.

EXCLUSIVE: Principal photography has begun on Pembridge Pictures and Umedia’s A Girl From Mogadishu starring How To Get Away With Murder‘s Aja Naomi King. The female empowerment film is a true story based on the testimony of Ifrah Ahmed, who — having escaped war-torn Somalia — emerged as one of the world’s foremost international activists against gender based violence. Mary McGuckian (The Price Of Desire) is directing and wrote the script. Filming is underway in Belgium…

‘Blade Runner 2049′: Deckard Returns From the Shadows in New Trailer (Video)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Get ready, sci-fi fans. Harrison Ford is back as Deckard, and he’s teaming up with Ryan Gosling in “Blade Runner 2049,” which got a new trailer on Monday morning that premiered on ABC during “Good Morning America.”

The new footage teases more plot details about the eagerly awaited movie which is set 30 years after the events of Ridley Scott‘s classic “Blade Runner”  — including more scenes of Jared Leto’s bad guy who at one point darkly intones, “The future of the species is finally unearthed.”

Gosling stars as Officer K, an LAPD officer who tracks down rogue androids called replicants, who look exactly like humans but are manufactured to work on offshore colonies.

But when K’s work leads him to a secret that could bring about the end of humanity, he follows a trail of bread crumbs that leads him to Deckard, the former cop who went missing after the end of the first movie.

Also Read: Comic-Con 2017: Warner Bros Bringing ‘Justice League,’ ‘Ready Player One’ to Hall H

Directed by “Sicario” and “Arrival” filmmaker Denis Villeneuve, the film also stars Ana De Armas, Jared Leto, Robin Wright, Dave Bautista, Edward James Olmos, and Barkhad Abdi.

Hampton Fancher, who wrote the first “Blade Runner” returns with a new screenplay co-written by Michael Green. Andrew A. Kosove, Broderick Johnson, Bud Yorkin, and Cynthia Yorkin are producers, with Ridley Scott as executive producer.

“Blade Runner 2049” hits theaters October 6. Watch the trailer in the clip above.

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‘Good Time’: Film Review | Cannes 2017

Read on: Hollywood Reporter - All Reviews.

Robert Pattinson stars as a small-time criminal on a nocturnal odyssey to break his brother out of custody in ‘Good Time,’ New York guerilla-filmmaking siblings Josh and Benny Safdie’s upgrade to the Cannes competition.read more

‘Dabka’ Helmer Bryan Buckley On The Tricky Politics Of Incorporating Somali Non-Actors Into The Film — Tribeca Studio

Read on: Deadline.

When Paul Greengrass took on Captain Phillips—starring Tom Hanks as the true-life captain who combatted Somali pirates at the height of their influence—the result was six Oscar nominations, including one for Best Picture. At the same time, writer/director Bryan Buckley knew that there was an entirely different angle on this story, hinging on a character who could propel a film through sheer force of will.
That individual would be Jay Bahadur (Evan Peters),  a frustrated…

‘Dabka’ Tribeca Review: A Scraggly Evan Peters Teams Up With Barkhad Abdi in Somalia

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The pleasingly self-aware and fast-paced “Dabka” begins with narration by journalist Jay Bahadur (Evan Peters) telling us that he hates movies where the main character narrates because that means that the screenwriters haven’t done their job to make the story work on a visual basis. While that may be true in some cases, “Dabka” itself is a movie where the brash but insecure voice of Bahadur grounds the story we are watching, and this voice also gives it some tension because we are never sure if his over-confidence might lead to disaster.

Based on a true story, “Dabka” begins in 2008 right after Bahadur graduates from college and his high school girlfriend breaks up with him. Unable to find a job, he is still living at home with his parents and doing a tedious marketing job until a chance encounter with the retired journalist Seymour Tolbin (Al Pacino).

Pacino offers the same loopy mentor performance that he has given many times before, but he and Melanie Griffith, who plays Bahadur’s mother, are basically special guest stars in this movie, which is carried by Peters in a high-energy and very appealing performance.

Also Read: United Ad Yanked From Tribeca After Mockery By Festival Attendees

Tolbin advises Bahadur to make his name by going to a dangerous place where no other journalist will go, and so Bahadur decides to go to Somalia because major news organizations are not sending reporters to cover a risky Somali pirates story. The spunky and even foolhardy Bahadur has nothing to lose and everything to prove, and “Dabka,” which means “fire” in Somali, traces his sometimes-blundering attempts to get a story and sell a book without unduly sensationalizing a country that he admires.

Bahadur is aided in this effort by his translator, Abdi, who is played by Barkhad Abdi, the actor who made such an impression playing a Somali pirate in “Captain Phillips” with Tom Hanks. This time Abdi plays a man who proudly wears an Obama hat and does everything he can to help Bahadur get a meeting with two of the main players: Boyah (Mohamed Barre), who is thought of as a Robin Hood figure, and the more menacing Garaad (Mohamed Osmail Ibrahim). Both of these men prefer to be known as “coast guards” rather than pirates, and both require the gift of drugs before consenting to an interview.

Bahadur dreams of his ex-girlfriend and starts growing a beard that eventually reaches mountain man length. He tries hard to secure a book deal with the material he is gathering, but he gets turned down with his least favorite rejection letter word, “unfortunately.” (As in, “Unfortunately, we just don’t feel this book is right for us.”) As played by Peters, Bahadur has a kind of nutty desperation about him that makes you worry that he’s going to get himself or someone else hurt.

Also Read: ‘American Horror Story’: Fans Rejoice Over Evan Peters’ Return

While staring out his window one day, Bahadur sees a very alluring young woman named Maryan (Sabrina Hassan) who sells drugs in the local market, and she looks back at him with a classic “come hither” stare. Maryan is one of Garaad’s wives, which makes her an extra-dangerous woman to pursue, but as usual Bahadur can’t help himself from going after a perilous goal.

As he gazes at Maryan at the market, Bahadur tells us in voiceover that we are not likely to meet our great love but that this likelihood is “enhanced by reckless behavior and naiveté,” and this counts as one of his most attractive moments.

Also Read: Tribeca: Kobe Bryant on His New Career as Storyteller, Moviemaker

“Dabka,” which is well written and directed by Bryan Buckley, bases its narrative on the burgeoning friendship between Bahadur and Abdi and the flirtation between Bahadur and Maryan, who enjoys American movies but dislikes “Black Hawk Down” because she feels it does not do justice to her people.

At one point toward the end of Bahadur’s visit to Somalia he sees a man on a horse with a sword who announces that there is a certain point when “life and prosperity is forbidden to an honorable man,” a concept that you are not likely to hear in the West. “Dabka” winningly traces the ways that a callow American gets schooled in concepts like honor and sacrifice until he is considered an expert on a country and a people that he grows to love.

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‘Blade Runner 2049’ Will Be Rated R, Director Confirms

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Blade Runner 2049” will follow in the steps of the original film, with director Denis Villeneuve stating that the sequel will be R-rated just like the original.

“My producers are finding it fun to remind me that it will be one of the most expensive R-rated independent feature films ever made,” Villeneuve told Screen Daily.

The sequel, written by Hampton Fancher and Michael Green, is set several decades after Ridley Scott’s 1982 original, which Fancher also had a hand in writing. The movies are based on Philip K. Dick’s novel “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep.”

Also Read: ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Teaser Trailer: First Look at Ryan Gosling, Harrison Ford Uniting

Alcon Entertainment also released the official plot synopsis of the film along with the teaser trailer: Thirty years after the events of the first film, a new blade runner, LAPD Officer K (Ryan Gosling), unearths a long-buried secret that has the potential to plunge what’s left of society into chaos. K’s discovery leads him on a quest to find Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), a former LAPD blade runner who has been missing for 30 years.

“Blade Runner” starred Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young and Edward James Olmos. The film depicted a dystopian Los Angeles in which genetically-engineered human replicants are created by a powerful corporation. Replicants are not permitted on Earth, and those replicants who deny the ban are hunted by police operatives called Blade Runners.

The sequel also stars Ana de Armas, Robin Wright, Jared Leto, Barkhad Abdi, Lennie James, Mackenzie Davis, and Sylvia Hoeks, and will hit theaters on Oct. 6, 2017. Sony Pictures is co-financing the movie with Alcon Entertainment and will distribute it internationally.

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