Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem Are Under Pressure in Tense ‘Everybody Knows’ English Trailer (Video)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem have told TheWrap how they were in “terrifying pain” while shooting their latest film, “Everybody Knows.” And in this first English language trailer for the film, that intensity shows.

Asghar Farhadi’s “Everybody Knows” is in Spanish, but Bardem narrates the opening to this first trailer in English, which is followed by an otherwise dialogue-free but none the less gripping first look.

“Sometimes the past, doesn’t always stay in the past,” Bardem says over an image of Cruz creeping into a dark attic before shrieking in agony.

Also Read: Penelope Cruz on ‘Everybody Knows’ Director: ‘He’s Demanding in a Very Good Way’ (Video)

The film is about a woman who returns to her hometown near Madrid, Spain, for her sister’s wedding, but endures a state of panic when the sibling goes missing. Ricardo Darin also co-stars.

“Everybody Knows” is the Iranian director Farhadi’s foll0w-up to “The Salesman,” and before that “A Separation,” both of which won the Oscar for Best Foreign Language film. After playing on the opening night of Cannes, which our critic referred to as one of the strongest opening night films in many years of the festival, “Everybody Knows” was picked up by Focus Features, who will open it for a brief, Oscar qualifying run beginning Nov. 30.

The film will open wide starting on Feb. 8, 2019. Watch the first trailer above:

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Penélope Cruz, Javier Bardem Film ‘Everybody Knows’ to Open in Time for Oscars

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Everybody Knows,” the Spanish-language psychological thriller from Oscar-winner Asghar Farhadi, will be released in theaters on Feb. 8, 2019, with a brief awards qualifying run beginning Nov. 30, the studio announced on Friday.

Focus Features picked up rights to the film ahead of its premiere opening-night screening at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival back in May.

The film, which stars Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem, is director Farhadi’s follow-up to his 2016 Oscar-winning foreign language film “The Salesman.” Farhadi also previously won the best foreign-language film Oscar for “A Separation.”

Also Read: Penelope Cruz on ‘Everybody Knows’ Director: ‘He’s Demanding in a Very Good Way’ (Video)

“Everybody Knows” follows Laura (Cruz) on her travels from Argentina to her small home town in Spain for her sister’s wedding, bringing her two children along for the occasion. Amid the joyful reunion and festivities, the eldest daughter is abducted. In the tense days that follow, various family and community tensions surface and deeply hidden secrets are revealed.

The film was is produced by Alexandre Mallet-Guy of Memento Films and Álvaro Longoria of Morena Films.

Focus acquired the rights to distribute in the United States, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, select Asian territories and the Middle East, apart from Iran. The film received rave reviews after its premiere screening.

Also Read: ‘Everybody Knows’ Film Review: Penélope Cruz, Javier Bardem in Strongest Cannes Opener in Years

Cruz told TheWrap that the film was one of the most painful experiences she’s had as an actress.

“All of my scenes were very intense,” Cruz told TheWrap in a magazine cover story. “In one scene I have a panic attack in the car, and I ended up in an ambulance myself. It was just from hyperventilation and from my blood sugar going very high from the stress of the scene. I remember getting out of the ambulance, and Asghar made sure I was OK.”

She paused. “And then he asked me for one more take.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Focus Features Acquires Penelope Cruz Drama ‘Everybody Knows’ in Cannes

Penélope Cruz Says She Spent Months in ‘Terrifying Pain’ for Cannes Opener ‘Everybody Knows’

Asghar Farhadi Recruits Prominent Iranian Americans to Represent Him at Oscars

‘Everybody Knows’: Penélope Cruz-Javier Bardem Thriller From Asghar Farhadi Set For February

Read on: Deadline.

Focus Features has set a February 8 limited release for Everybody Knows (Todos lo Saben), Asghar Farhadi’s psychological thriller starring Penélope Cruz, Javier Bardem and Ricardo Darín that opened the Cannes Film Festival in May.
Written and dir…

Penelope Cruz on ‘Everybody Knows’ Director: ‘He’s Demanding in a Very Good Way’ (Video)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Penelope Cruz says that her character Laura in the new film “Everybody Knows” is the most difficult role she’s played in her career. But she told TheWrap at the Toronto Film Festival that her performance wouldn’t have been possible without the “demanding” influence of director Asghar Farhadi.

“We all know he’s very special, very clever and very demanding. I say he’s demanding in a very good way. For me, that’s a virtue, not something bad,” Cruz told TheWrap’s Sharon Waxman. “I don’t think how I could’ve done that with somebody that didn’t have what he has.”

Farhadi, an Iranian director whose films “A Separation” and “The Salesman” both won the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar, returns with “Everybody Knows” about a woman who returns to her hometown near Madrid for her sister’s wedding, but endures a state of panic when her sister goes missing.

Also Read: ‘Everybody Knows’ Film Review: Penélope Cruz, Javier Bardem in Strongest Cannes Opener in Years

Cruz, who stars along with her husband Javier Bardem, said that as soon as 15 minutes into the movie, enters into “such a horrible state of pain, desperation and horror.” She looked to the direction and writing of Farhadi to guide her through the experience.

“He needs to be very tough, he needs to ask you for the truth, and he was like that with all of us,” Cruz said. “He needs to tell you when something is not real and when you’re faking things and when things are empty. But he does it in a way where he’s so sweet and so respectful to everybody that you just want to give him your best.”

Bardem added that he worked closely with Farhadi to find the same nuance in his own character, who he described as a simple man, but was a no less complex character to create.

Also Read: ‘Everybody Knows’ Stars Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem CannesWrap Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

“You don’t want him to look like a moron. Or you don’t want him to look like somebody who is too innocent,” Bardem said. “But he chose to be a person who gives, who takes care of the other, who really sees the other, rather than being too focused on himself. And we tried to achieve that soul of a man who is really there for others.”

Watch a clip from TheWrap’s interview above.

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Asghar Farhadi On Working with Spanish Royalty Javier Bardem And Penélope Cruz For Kidnap Thriller ‘Everybody Knows’ – Toronto Studio

Read on: Deadline.

Like its director, Asghar Farhadi’s new film made its Toronto debut after racking up quite a few air miles, having premiered as the opening attraction at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. His second film, after 2013’s The Past, to be filmed in a foreig…

Oscar-Winner Asghar Farhadi Named Jury President of Sarajevo Film Festival

Read on: Variety.

Oscar-winning filmmaker Asghar Farhadi will head the competition jury for the 24th Sarajevo Film Festival, the festival announced Tuesday. The Iranian director is fresh off the world premiere of his latest film, “Everybody Knows,” as the opener of the …

Cannes Film Market ‘Healthy’ as New Players Fill Streaming Giant Void

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Predictions of the Marche du Film’s death were greatly exaggerated. While indie film prices have come back to earth after big-spending streaming giants rattled the ecosystem a few years back, industry players told TheWrap, the market at Cannes was buzzing this year from start to finish.

“A lot of times, people associate activity with the big players spending a lot of money and buying movies for big price tags,” Saban Films President Bill Bromiley told TheWrap from France on Friday.

“That can be a little misleading,” said the executive, whose company brought home five films — more than any other distributor to visit the festival this year.

Also Read: The Cannes – Oscar Connection: How Strong Will It Be This Year?

It was a polarizing year at Cannes, with no shortage of hemming and hawing about the state of affairs in the coastal haven. The headlines and soundbites came in waves saying anything from “Cannes is dead” to “Cannes needs to change” to “Cannes change is here.”  And depending on whom you asked, the market was abysmal or doing just fine.

Still, acquisition news seemed to come fast and furious out of the gate — and included at least two bidding wars that climbed into the eight figures.

And while recent big spenders like Netflix and Amazon were quieter, and The Weinstein Company MIA altogether, several major new players stepped up to make a big splash in acquisitions.

Saban started scoring on day two, taking the Gerard Butler psychological thriller “Keepers” and the Keanu Reeves romantic thriller “Siberia.” The spending spree continued with the ensemble romance “Berlin, I Love You” with Kiera Knightley and Helen Mirren, Nicolas Cage’s “Between Worlds” and the historical action film “Viking Destiny.” 

Also Read: Is the Cannes Film Festival in Decline? Not to the French

Two rich deals came after all-night bidding (a welcome sight after the frigid pace of the market at Sundance): for Karyn Kusama’s follow-up to “The Invitation,” a cult-and-cop thriller starring Nicole Kidman called “Destroyer” that went for a reported eight figures to Megan Ellison’s Annapruna Pictures.

And Universal paid a reported $20 million-plus for North American rights to the star-studded spy caper “355” with Jessica Chastain, Lupita Nyong’o, Fan Bingbing, Marion Cotillard and Penelope Cruz. The studio beat out several studios for the yet-to-shoot production, including suitor Amazon Studios. Sales rep FilmNation also sold many international territories in million-dollar deals, an individual familiar with the negotiations told TheWrap.

“Climax” sold to A24

After a splashy showing at February’s Berlin Film Festival, Global Road made good on its promise to be an active player under new boss Rob Friedman. The studio, rebranded and expanded from Open Road, paid an undisclosed amount for rights to a new take on “The Secret Garden” starring Colin Firth and Julie Walters. The film came fully financed from Studiocanal.

There were also a few sacred cows to be had. Magnolia Pictures took Hirokazu Kore-eda’s
“Shoplifters” only 24 hours before it won the festival’s highest honor, the Palme d’Or.  A24 nabbed Gaspar Noe’s dancing horror fever dream “Climax,” well before it would land him the top honor in the Directors’ Fortnight section. “BlacKkKlansman,” which won Spike Lee the Grand Prix, was presold to Focus.

Focus also scooped up Asghar Farhadi’s opening night film “Everybody Knows,” starring real-life couple Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem. Sony Pictures Classics took the devastating awards hopeful “Capernaum” from director Nadine Labaki. Both deals were a reported low-seven figures.

Bleecker Street won the brutal survival story “Arctic” with Mads Mikkelsen. Tom Quinn’s Neon made its first ever Cannes purchase with the horror tale “Border,” from the author of  “Let the Right One In.”

Also Read: ‘Shoplifters’ Wins Palme d’Or at 2018 Cannes Film Festival

The streaming companies weren’t entirely absent. While Netflix publicly ghosted the festival in April after bylaws were changed to require a French theatrical release for all competition films, Ted Sarandos’ team couldn’t resist buying a bit of prestige.

The streaming giant bought “Happy as Lazzaro,” which premiered in competition and was awarded Best Screenplay for Alice Rohrwacher, as well as Lukas Dhont’s “Girl,” which won the Camera d’Or for best first film and best actor for star Victor Polsterin the Un Certain Regard section.

Amazon Studios brought the rousing period drama “Cold War,” directed by Oscar winner Pawel Pawlikowski, to the competition after acquiring it last summer.

Before the Marche du Film opened, experts warned us the buyers would be cautious. But that doesn’t mean stagnant, Bromiley concluded.

“There are a lot of projects out there, and we had to dig a little deeper this year. That’s been for the past few years, it used to come a lot easier. But the market is very healthy on the domestic side, and obviously our sales reflect that,” he said.

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Cannes Report, Day 1: ‘Everybody Knows’ Premieres, Cate Blanchett Shines on the Croisette

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The 2018 Cannes Film Festival is officially in full swing: “Everybody Knows” premiered Tuesday night to open the festival, where everyone had eyes for jury president Cate Blanchett.

Asghar Farhadi’s “Everybody Knows,” or “Todos Lo Saben,” wasn’t on the market long after the film premiered to somewhat mixed reviews — Focus Features nabbed the U.S. and international rights faster than anyone could say, “Croisette.”

Blanchett and the rest of the jury took on issues of #TimesUp and the lack of female directors during a press conference on Tuesday, with Blanchett assuring audiences that all films will be regarded equally in terms of the “quality” of the work, and not whether they have a female director or not.

Also Read: Why Cannes Film Market May Move at an Escargot’s Pace This Year

Wednesday will see the premiere of two competition titles, “Yommedine” and “Leto,” the former having a first-time director — a rarity for the Cannes competition. The latter is by a director under house arrest in Russia.

All in all, a continued pattern of caution will reign when it comes to deals at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, numerous industry insiders told TheWrap. In general, festival titles have been selling at a snail’s pace since last September’s Toronto International Film Festival.

Some things to watch out for during the festival: Amazon and Netflix’s spending spree — or lack thereof — this year. And distributors buying content packages with big movie stars attached.

See what everyone has been talking about on the first day of Cannes below.

“Everybody Knows” Premieres

On Tuesday, Asghar Farhadi’s new film, “Everybody Knows,” or “Todos Lo Saben,” premiered at Cannes — to somewhat mixed reviews.

The Guardian’s Peter Bradshaw called it an “intimately painful and powerful drama,” while IndieWire’s David Ehrlich described the film starring Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem as “a layered, absorbing kidnapping drama…. Bardem rules. Farhadi’s best since ‘A Separation.’”

However, other critics weren’t too kind. One early viewer said it was “kind of empty, low key and not at all interesting,” while Alex Billington wrote, “Just wanted it to be over, and now it thankfully is.”

Critics reviews skewed more positive than negative — on MetaCritic, the drama holds a score of 73 percent.

Also Read: ‘Everybody Knows’ Film Review: Penélope Cruz, Javier Bardem in Strongest Cannes Opener in Years

Regardless of the reviews, Focus Features pounced on “Everybody Knows,” acquiring the film for U.S. and key international territories early Wednesday morning.

Directed by Oscar-winning Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi, the film follows Laura (Cruz) on her travels from Argentina to her small home town in Spain for her sister’s wedding, bringing her two children along for the occasion.  Amid the joyful reunion and festivities, the eldest daughter is abducted. In the tense days that follow, various family and community tensions surface and deeply hidden secrets are revealed.

See more reviews below.

Asghar Farhadi’s Everybody Knows is an intimately painful and powerful drama, crucially anchored by three heavyweight performances – Cruz, Bardem, Darín. Review later #Canne2018 #Cannes71 #Cannes

— Peter Bradshaw (@PeterBradshaw1) May 8, 2018

Asghar Farhadi’s Everybody Knows is an intimately painful and powerful drama, crucially anchored by three heavyweight performances – Cruz, Bardem, Darín. Review later #Canne2018 #Cannes71 #Cannes

— Peter Bradshaw (@PeterBradshaw1) May 8, 2018

Best Opener since… aveeeeery long time, but not Farhadi‘s best. #Cannes2018

— Joachim Kurz (@Mietgeist) May 8, 2018

Everybody Knows is messy melodrama that doesn’t add up to much but it’s Farhadi’s most cinematic work. Although that’s never been his strength so… #cannes2018

— Gregory Ellwood (@TheGregoryE) May 8, 2018

EVERYBODY KNOWS: a layered, absorbing kidnapping drama about secrets, the specter of money, and how such things can curdle into the kind of resentment that’s starving for any chance to make itself real. Bardem rules. Farhadi’s best since A SEPARATION. solid start to #Cannes2018.

— david ehrlich (@davidehrlich) May 8, 2018

You see the twist coming 20 minutes in, but hey, Farhadis #EverybodyKnows is still fun in its delicate deconstruction of a family. Bardem is having fun. So is Cruz but her role reduces her to the sobbing mama in the end. Too bad. It could‘ve used more viciousness. #cannes2018

— Beatrice Behn (@DansLeCinema) May 8, 2018

EVERYBODY KNOWS: Another rock solid episode of “The Young & The Restless” from Asghar Farhadi. The guy makes soaps! Is this a crime? I give it a B. #Cannes2018

— Jordan Hoffman (@jhoffman) May 8, 2018

EVERYBODY KNOWS: Asghar Farhadi spins great yarns of doubt and tension and he’s got a kidnap whodunit worthy of Agatha Christie with his latest. Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem co-star, but it’s an ensemble success. A strong start to #Cannes2018

— Peter Howell (@peterhowellfilm) May 8, 2018

Everybody Knows – Everybody was bored. Big Spanish wedding turns into kidnapping thriller turns into big Spanish domestic drama. Didn’t grab me like Farhadi’s past films. Just wanted it to be over, and now it thankfully is. #cannes2018

— Alex Billington (@firstshowing) May 8, 2018

EVERYBODY KNOWS is minor Farhadi. Kind of empty, low key and not all that interesting. Applause at the press screening was muted perhaps because if just that. #Cannes2018

— The Syndicate (@YourSyndicate) May 8, 2018

EVERYBODY KNOWS is maudlin siliness, it’s family melodrama wrapped in a kidnapping caper that trades on the chrasima of its stars to little success. Predictability overshadows any moments of meaning or impact #Cannes2018

— ???????????????????? ???????????????????????? (@filmfest_ca) May 8, 2018

Cate Blanchett

It’s clear that the best reviews out of Cannes haven’t been about movies so far — instead, everyone can’t stop raving about Queen Cate Blanchett.

As president of the Cannes jury, Blanchett was front and center during the first day of Cannes, giving opening remarks and posing with the rest of the jury that included Ava DuVernay and Kristen Stewart (who also couldn’t stop ogling at Blanchett).

Also Read: Cannes’ Female Troubles: Women Directors Have Always Been Scarce

In fact, the hashtag #Cannes2018 was filled with pictures of Blanchett in her stunning pink suit and matching sunnies.

Cate Blanchett on films by women at #Cannes2018: “[They] are not there because of their gender but because of the quality of their work. We will be assessing them as filmmakers, as we should be.” https://t.co/yjD26E0kqv pic.twitter.com/3RXMewF5vq

— IndieWire (@IndieWire) May 8, 2018

Cate Blanchett at the Cannes Jury Photocall. She looks amazing pic.twitter.com/HhB96uhetG

— Best of Cate (@bestofcate) May 8, 2018

good morning to kristen stewart and cate blanchett at cannes only pic.twitter.com/Bzn83U9tLj

— Kristen (@salesonfilm) May 8, 2018

”Being attractive doesn’t preclude being intelligent. I think this is by its very nature a glamorous, fantastic, spectacular festival full of joie de vivre, full of great, good humor, full of discord and disharmony,”

— Cate Blanchett on red-carpet glamour and Cannes. pic.twitter.com/z9CRcgokg3

— Best of Cate (@bestofcate) May 8, 2018

find someone who looks at you the way kristen stewart is looking at cate blanchett omg ???? #Cannes pic.twitter.com/9qC4socrWU

— Ashley Lee (@cashleelee) May 8, 2018

The jury faced questions of #TimesUp and the number of films directed by women during a press conference on the first day of the festival. According to IndieWire, Blanchett insisted she will look at each film with an open mind, since three films under Palme d’Or consideration are directed by women.

The films in consideration directed by women “are not there because of their gender but because of the quality of their work. We will be assessing them as filmmakers, as we should be.”

“Would I like to see more women in competition?” Blanchett asked. “Absolutely.”

According to TheWrap’s Steve Pond, the Cannes Film Festival has had a dismal record of showcasing the work of female directors for decaes.  Over the first 71 years of Cannes, a paltry 4.3 percent of the competition films have been directed by women.

Only one, Jane Campion’s “The Piano,” has won Cannes’ top prize, the Palme d’Or, though actresses Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea Seudoux were given honorary Palmes alongside “Blue Is the Warmest Color” director Abdellatif Kechiche’s real one in 2013.

Admittedly, things are getting better. Of the 11 times that three or more women have placed films in competition, eight have come in the last 13 years. Three women made the cut in 2006, 2007, 2009, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 — and four did so in 2011.

Keanu Reeves, Alex Winter Are Back for Third ‘Bill & Ted’ Film

On Tuesday, “Bill & Ted” was trending on Twitter in the United States because it was announced that Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter would reprise their roles as “Ted” Theodore Logan and “Bill” S. Preston Esq. in “Bill & Ted Face the Music,” the third film in the franchise.

The first film, “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure,” was released in 1989. The sequel “Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey” came out in 1991.

Also Read: Keanu Reeves, Alex Winter to Reprise Roles in Third ‘Bill & Ted’ Film

MGM is set to release the film domestically under its Orion Pictures banner. Endeavor Content negotiated the deal. Bloom will be handling the international sales in Cannes this week and will be introducing the films to buyers.

Getty Images

Screen Media Sings for Julianne Moore’s ‘Bel Canto’

Screen Media picked up the North American rights to Paul Weitz’s “Bel Canto,” the company announced Tuesday.

The film, which Weitz and Anthony Weintraub adapted from the best-selling 2001 novel by Ann Patchett, stars Julianne Moore as a famous American soprano who travels to South America in the 1990s to give a private concert at the birthday party of a wealthy Japanese industrialist (Ken Watanabe) — and then gets caught in a hostage situation.

The cast also includes Sebastian Koch, Christopher Lambert, Ryo Kase, Tenoch Huerta, and María Mercedes Coroy.

Still No Selfies Allowed

Everyone can’t seem to stop talking about how adamant the festival is this year about not allowing selfies and photographs on the red carpet.

On Monday, TheWrap’s Steve Pond reported that The Cannes Film Festival has laid down some new, or at least updated, rules this year. No selfies on the red carpet. No Netflix films. No press screenings in advance of premieres.

The Los Angeles Times’ Amy Kaufman tweeted, “Everyone abiding by selfie rule. I got reprimanded for even having my phone camera on.”

Cannes is not messing around w/ selfie ban. I just got my ticket for opening gala, in envelope is this: “No selfies and pictures on the red carpet, thank you. *offenders will be denied entrance to the screenings.” No personal photography on most photographed red carpet in world. pic.twitter.com/ZFB27gDvxR

— Chris Gardner (@chrissgardner) May 8, 2018

If you’re at #Cannes remember, no selfies, no Netflix, no horseplay, no hoop-and-stick, no hopscotch, no ice cream socials, no “jump rope,” no homemade jams or jellies, no catching fireflies, no “May pole,” and no referencing films any other way besides “The [Director Surname]”

— Josh L. Dickey (@JLDlite) May 8, 2018

At my first #cannes opening night and it feels even fancier than the #Oscars. They play music as stars walk down the red carpet and announce each celebrity with their resume. Also: Everyone abiding by selfie rule. I got reprimanded for even having my phone camera on.

— Amy Kaufman (@AmyKinLA) May 8, 2018

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Women in Cannes: A Short History of Small Victories and Decades of Male Dominance (Photos)

Penélope Cruz Says She Spent Months in ‘Terrifying Pain’ for Cannes Opener ‘Everybody Knows’

Cannes Film Festival 2018 Preview: No Selfies, No Netflix, No Problem

Focus Features Acquires Penelope Cruz Drama ‘Everybody Knows’ in Cannes

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Focus Features has acquired “Everybody Knows,” the opening night film of the Cannes Film Festival starring Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem, for US and key international distribution, the company announced.

Directed by Oscar-winning Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi, The film follows Laura (Cruz) on her travels from Argentina to her small home town in Spain for her sister’s wedding, bringing her two children along for the occasion.  Amid the joyful reunion and festivities, the eldest daughter is abducted. In the tense days that follow, various family and community tensions surface and deeply hidden secrets are revealed.

Also Read: ‘Everybody Knows’ Film Review: Penélope Cruz, Javier Bardem in Strongest Cannes Opener in Years

“Asghar is a world-class filmmaker whose work transcends language,” said Focus chairman Peter Kujawski.  “Matching his talents with these emotionally charged performances from Penelope, Javier and Ricardo will leave audiences captivated.”

Focus acquired the rights to distribute in the United States, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, select Asian territories and the Middle East, apart from Iran. The film received strong reviews after its premiere screening.

Cruz told TheWrap that the film was one of the most painful for her to experience as an actress.

“All of my scenes were very intense,” Cruz told TheWrap in a magazine cover story. “In one scene I have a panic attack in the car, and I ended up in an ambulance myself. It was just from hyperventilation and from my blood sugar going very high from the stress of the scene. I remember getting out of the ambulance, and Asghar made sure I was OK.”

She paused. “And then he asked me for one more take.”

UTA Indie Film Group and Memento Films International negotiated the deal on behalf of the filmmaking team. Farhadi is represented by UTA. 

‘Everybody Knows’ Film Review: Penélope Cruz, Javier Bardem in Strongest Cannes Opener in Years

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Most years, the Cannes Film Festival opens with a forgettable film: the French melodrama “Ismael’s Ghosts” last year, Woody Allen’s “Café Society” the year before, the aggressively unpleasant “Standing Tall” and the risible “Grace of Monaco” in 2015 and 2014, respectively.

This year, though, Cannes opted to kick off with Asghar Farhadi’s “Everybody Knows,” which is a different matter entirely. The Iranian director is a master of examining the tensions of class and gender and detailing the large and small matters that can gnaw at people and at a society.

His Spanish-language film starring Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem is a worthy successor to the string of standout films he’s been sending to international festivals over the last decade: “About Elly,” which won the Silver Bear at Berlin in 2009; “A Separation,” which won the Golden Bear at that festival in 2011 and went on to take the foreign-language Academy Award; “The Past,” which won acting and screenplay honors at Cannes in 2016; and “The Salesman,” which also won the Cannes screenplay award and the foreign Oscar.

Also Read: Cannes’ Female Troubles: Women Directors Have Always Been Scarce

“Everybody Knows,” which launched the 2018 Cannes on Tuesday night after a gala opening-night ceremony, transplants many of Farhadi’s usual concerns to a small village in Spain. The advance word called it a psychological thriller, and it does contain some thriller elements such as a crime and a race against time to save a young girl who’s gone missing.

But this is not Farhadi doing a genre exercise; as is most of his work, “Everybody Knows” is a quietly gripping examination of societal divisions, of class, of secrets that bind us together and pull us apart.

And it’s about what happens when secrets aren’t really secrets, when “everybody knows” — or suspects, or at least gossips.

Also Read: Penélope Cruz Says She Spent Months in ‘Terrifying Pain’ for Cannes Opener ‘Everybody Knows’

Many of those secrets swirl around Laura and Paco, played by Cruz and Bardem. She’s a woman from the village who has been living with her husband and children in Argentina for years, but who returns to Spain for her sister’s wedding. Played by Cruz, Laura is both a beloved member of this community and somehow apart from it; her resentments toward the people she left behind, and theirs toward her, aren’t always obvious, but they’re present.

Paco, on the other hand, appears to be a local farmhand working the vineyard when we first see him in sweat-drenched flannel. He looks completely comfortable as a laborer — but it turns out that this is his vineyard and his estate, and when his wife beckons him into the house to take a shower and change, it’s clear that he’s not quite as comfortable as he was out on a tractor.

We learn soon enough that Laura and Paco grew up together and were in love as teenagers, when her family owned the land and his worked on it. But at one point, Paco bought part of the estate from Laura at a good price, helping her out when she needed money but also prompting mutterings that he’d taken advantage of the family to attain his undeserved status as an estate owner.

Also Read: Cannes Film Festival 2018 Preview: No Selfies, No Netflix, No Problem

But the resentments only surface after a catastrophe. Laura’s daughter Irene (Carla Campra) feels ill during the wedding celebration and goes upstairs to sleep it off — but at some point, Laura realizes Irene is missing, which sends her into a panic that elevates to hysteria when she gets a text announcing that her daughter has been kidnapped.

In a way, this incident puts “Everybody Knows” in a league with Farhadi’s “About Elly,” in which a young woman disappears while on a beach trip with friends. Neither film was a whodunit by any means; Farhadi may eventually tell you what happened and who did it, but he’s far more interested in letting the dominoes fall and the buried troubles surface.

Laura’s feckless husband, played by Argentinian actor Ricardo Darin, is absent at first and then shows up to insist that God will take care of things, which enrages his wife. She turns to Paco for help, which begins to raise questions both in the minds of other characters and viewers. (Most of the latter, it’s safe to say, will be a step or two ahead of the former.)

Cruz and Bardem have acted together several times, both before and after they became a real-life couple, but they have rarely gone to these emotional extremes together. For Bardem, the anguish is largely internal — but as “Biutiful” showed, few actors are better at conveying the weight of the world in a furrowed brow or a slumped shoulder.

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For Cruz, meanwhile, this is a tour de force performance constructed from shades of anger, desperation and near catatonic grief, almost as exhausting to watch as it must have been to deliver.

Farhadi is a rigorous filmmaker but not a showy one, and “Everybody Knows” is as formally understated as it is emotionally wrought. Though Alberto Iglesias is credited with a score, the vast majority of the film unfolds in silence, the better to hear each panicked gasp or suffer through each pregnant pause.

Farhadi does not speak Spanish, and used two translators on the set to make himself understood by the cast. (They also spoke a lot of broken English, says Bardem.) He is perhaps a more incisive and cutting chronicler of his home country than of France or Spain; you can see why, after he made “The Past” in Paris in 2013, he felt he needed to return to Iran to make “The Salesman” before heading to Spain for “Everybody Knows.”

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But this is strong, disquieting work — and even when we get the kind of answers about what actually happened that Farhadi sometimes withholds in his films, it remains a dark character study of people who will never recover from old loves and old grudges.

It is also the most substantial film to open a Cannes Film Festival in years. The festival’s new policy of not holding press screenings in advance of public premieres meant that “Everybody Knows” was the only film screened in the Palais on opening day, a fact that led to more than a few grumbles. But if you’re only going to show off a single film, at least it was one that warranted this kind of spotlight.

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Penélope Cruz Says She Spent Months in ‘Terrifying Pain’ for Cannes Opener ‘Everybody Knows’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

This story about Penélope Cruz, Javier Bardem and “Everybody Knows” appeared in TheWrap’s magazine’s Cannes issue.

On the day that Penélope Cruz ended up in an ambulance on the set of “Everybody Knows,” she found out just what kind of director Asghar Farhadi is.

In the film, the opening-night attraction at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, Cruz plays a woman whose teenage daughter abruptly disappears under mysterious circumstances during a wedding celebration. She spends most of the film in a state of panic and desperation, enlisting the help of an old flame played by her real-life husband, Javier Bardem.

“All of my scenes were very intense,” Cruz told TheWrap. “In one scene I have a panic attack in the car, and I ended up in an ambulance myself. It was just from hyperventilation and from my blood sugar going very high from the stress of the scene. I remember getting out of the ambulance, and Asghar made sure I was OK.”

She paused. “And then he asked me for one more take.”

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Cruz started laughing as she described a director so devoted to his film that he asked for another take from an actress who’d just required medical treatment. “I know he was worried about me, and that was the most important thing,” she insisted. “But after that, he wanted one more. And I never felt that he was crossing the line. He was always very respectful, but of course he went for the truth.”

Bardem added that Farhadi had an uncanny ability to ferret out that truth even though he shot his film in Spanish, a language he doesn’t speak. “He knows when you’re lying,” he said of the director, who used two translators on the set. “You can be in the middle of a very emotional scene, and he will show up and the translator will say, ‘Your eyes are lying. Please don’t act.’ And f—, he is right. He knows it, he feels it. Maybe it was a pause, maybe it was a word. He doesn’t know the language, but he knows that the words were not organically said.”

In many ways, the notion of truth was what drew both Cruz and Bardem to Farhadi, the Iranian director whose last three films include two Oscar winners in the Best Foreign Language Film category: 2011’s “A Separation” and 2015’s “The Salesman,” both studies of families stretched to the breaking point by secrets and class and societal tensions.

“I saw ‘A Separation,’ and like millions of other people I was blown away by the quality of the film, and by how pure it is in every sense,” said Bardem. “When I saw it, and when I saw [2009’s] ‘About Elly’ before that, I was thoroughly moved by the truth and the human quality he brings to his movies.”

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Cruz agreed. “‘A Separation’ is one of my favorite movies,” she said. “It’s like you’re watching life — you don’t see anybody acting, any tricks, any lies. It’s like a piece of life that he puts up there without judgment.”

On the heels of “A Separation,” Farhadi met with Bardem and said he was interested in making a film in Spain and would like Bardem to be part of it. Later, he separately went to Cruz and had the same conversation.

The couple, who had gotten married in 2010 and had the first of their two children in 2011, had made a few films together, including 1992’s “Jamón Jamón” — Bardem’s first starring role, in which a teenaged Cruz also appeared — and Woody Allen’s 2008 comedy “Vicky Cristina Barcelona,” for which Cruz won the Best Supporting Actress Academy Award a year after Bardem had won his own Best Supporting Actor Oscar for “No Country for Old Men.”

Despite those projects, though, they tended to work separately. It’s a coincidence, Cruz said, that this film appears only a year after they also acted together in “Loving Pablo,” in which he played drug lord Pablo Escobar and she was journalist Virginia Vallejo, Escobar’s lover.

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“It’s delicate, putting ourselves in front of a camera together,” said Bardem. “We don’t want to be doing something that is not worth the time that we are going to be spending together on it. We get along great on screen and we work together very well, but we don’t want to do it just because. It has to be special.”

But they were both eager to work with Farhadi, so they jumped aboard the project that was subsequently postponed when the director decided that he didn’t want to follow his 2013 Paris-set movie “The Past” with another film made outside his native Iran.

“We knew that he wanted to do something else in Iran, and ‘The Salesman’ was a priority for him,” said Bardem. “But that gave him time for writing and changing and being more specific in ‘Everybody Knows.’

“You have to be careful when you are dealing with delicate material about relationships, characters, and also a culture that is foreign to you. As he learned more and comprehended the habitat, the way we speak and relate to each other, he started to add many details.”

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The story that emerged featured Cruz as Laura, a mother who returns from her home in Argentina to her hometown in Spain for the wedding of her sister. Bardem plays Paco, a onetime farmhand with whom she had a lengthy relationship in her teens. He’s now a landowner who helped her out by buying some of her family’s property, though some relatives think he got an unfair break on the price.

The tangled history of the two characters, which emerges as they race to find her daughter, is laden with secrets. Some come to light over the course of the movie, and some are never really as secret as Laura and Paco think. But in creating the shared history of the characters, Bardem said, his own decade-long relationship with Cruz was in fact an impediment rather than an aid.

“You have to clear the slate,” he said. “You go through your day as the father and the mother of these beautiful kids you have, and then you have to undo all of that to get into the fiction. You have to embody that fictional character — the way he sees the world, the way he treats others. And the moment you do that, you start to see the other person differently.

“There are a couple of scenes that are very intense, one in particular where we talk about how we were in the past, and nothing of us is in there. It’s imagining, working, creating something that doesn’t exist, even though the emotions are real and the bodies are our bodies.”

The shoot had other challenges, not least of which was explaining to the famously workaholic Farhadi how they do things in Spain. “I think ‘The Salesman’ was shot for 60 days in a row without one day off,” Bardem said. “And when he got the idea that in Spain we have weekends off, and even if we work on Saturdays we only have a half day, it took him a while to adjust.

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“He said, ‘Why do we have to take a break? It’s better to go with the flow.’ We were laughing, and we said, ‘We know you are capable of doing this, but in Spain we need to stop! We need a siesta, we need a good glass of wine!’ And by the end of the shoot he loved it.”

For a three-week rehearsal period, Bardem said the director put his actors in many different settings that were not in the script as a way of fleshing out the world and making sure that they knew exactly how the characters would respond to everything.

“By the time we get to the set, we have put the characters in every possible situation,” he said. “But he won’t ever ask you go to a place where you aren’t comfortable or you feel excruciating pain.”

Then again, excruciating pain might be an accurate description of the journey made by Cruz’s character. “The shooting was four months long, and we were lucky that Asghar is such an easy person to be around,” she said. “But it was a very demanding character — I think the most difficult I’ve ever had to do.

“My character is happy at the beginning of the movie, but in everything else, she is desperate and going through a very deep and terrifying kind of pain. I was there every day for months. And my engine, my strength, came from thinking about, feeling for all the mothers that have feared losing their children from illness or war or situations like the one in the movie.

“This was a personal homage to those women, and that gave me the strength every day to do it. I didn’t even talk to Asghar about that, but it was my secret nutrition for everyday survival.”

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She also had to figure out how to bring new shades to Laura’s desperation. “She’s always in a state of pain and panic, but I tried to bring different kinds of energy, from panic to fear to the loss of hope to getting back some hope,” she said. “I tried to find different colors in each situation.

“I was playing somebody who had to take two very strong sleeping pills to even sleep for four hours without losing her mind. So what is her energy like the morning after, or when she’s been up for two days?”

For Farhadi’s actors, added Bardem, the key to pleasing the demanding director was figuring out how to transcend acting. “He doesn’t want you to play the scene,” he said. “He wants you to go through the experience of the scene. And once you do the scene, he helps you get back on track and leave that experience in the scene. There’s silence, and time to recover.”

When Cruz thought back on the experience that put her in a state of hysteria for months and in an ambulance at one point, she also lavished praise on the director who steered her into those dark places and made sure she found the truths in that darkness. But then she added a succinct note: “By the end,” she said, “I was ready to finish.”

But she and Bardem are also ready for Cannes, which they’ve both been to numerous times before. For Bardem, the pleasures of heading to the Croisette with “Everybody Knows” are numerous.

“What a great honor it is for any actor on Earth to open the greatest cinema festival in the world,” he said. “And to do it along with Asghar Farhadi and your wife, it doesn’t get any better than this.”

Read more of TheWrap’s magazine’s Cannes issue here.

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Penelope Cruz, Javier Bardem Film ‘Everybody Knows’ to Open Cannes Film Festival

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Everybody Knows,” starring Javier Bardem, Penelope Cruz and Ricardo Darin, will open the 71st Cannes Film Festival, festival organizers announced on Thursday.

Asghar Farhadi directed the psychological thriller, and the film is the second film that is not in English or French to open the festival after Pedro Almodovar’s “Bad Education” in 2004.

“Everybody Knows,” written by Farhadi, follows Laura (Cruz) who travels from Buenos Aires to her native village in Spain with her family. However, the big family reunion is disrupted by events that change the character’s lives.

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Iranian director Farhadi had two films in the Cannes competition previously — “The Salesman” in 2016 and “The Past” in 2013. “The Salesman” won the Oscar for Best Foreign Film.

The Cannes Opening Ceremony will be held on May 8th and will be broadcast free-to-air by Canal + as well as in partner cinemas and followed by the preview screening of the film in select theaters in France.

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“Everybody Knows” is produced by Memento Films Production and Morena Films. International sales are being handled by Memento Films International and the French distribution by Memento Films. The film will be released on May 9 in French cinemas.

The 71st Cannes Film Festival will be held from May 8 to May 19. The competition jury will be headed by Cate Blanchett.

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Watch Penelope Cruz, Javier Bardem & Ricardo Darin In First Trailer For Asghar Farhadi’s Cannes Opener ‘Everybody Knows’

Read on: Deadline.

The first trailer has dropped for Cannes opener Everybody Knows, starring Penelope Cruz, Javier Bardem and Ricardo Darin. Cannes announced earlier today that Oscar-winner Asghar Farhadi’s Spanish-language movie would kick off the festival.

The thriller, which is produced by France’s Memento Films Production and Spain’s Morena Films, follows a Spanish woman, played by Cruz, who lives in Buenos Aires in Argentina and returns to her home in Madrid with her Argentinean…

Asghar Farhadi’s ‘Everybody Knows’ With Bardem & Cruz Closes In On Deal To Open Cannes 2018

Read on: Deadline.

Speculation is growing that Asghar Farhadi‘s Everybody Knows, which stars Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem, is set to open the Cannes Film Festival. However, Deadline understands that discussions have not been finalized and festival chief Thierry Frémaux is expected to greenlight a decision tomorrow.
Deadline reported last month that the Iranian filmmaker’s first film in Spanish, known locally as Todos Lo Saben, was a likely opener for the 71st edition of the film…