Attorney Says He Told Michael Cohen About Eric Schneiderman Misconduct Accusations in 2013

A New York lawyer says that he told President Donald Trump’s personal attorney, Michael Cohen, about accusations of abuse against then-New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman during a 2013 phone conversation, the New York Times reports.

In a letter Friday to the judge overseeing the Cohen investigation, attorney Peter Gleason asked the court to issue a protective order sealing any notes Cohen may have taken during their conversation. It’s unclear whether Cohen made any such notes. A lawyer for Cohen did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for clarification.

Gleason said that in 2012 and 2013 he was approached by two different women who claimed that Schneiderman was “sexually inappropriate” with them, and that he advised the women not to report what happened to prosecutors. Gleason discussed the matter with a retired New York Post columnist, Stephen Dunleavy, instead.

Also Read: Anti-Weinstein Prosecutor Eric Schneiderman Resigns After Accusations of Abuse Against 4 Women

Gleason said that Dunleavy offered to talk about the issue with Trump. At the time, Schneiderman was engaged in legal action against Trump University over claims the school defrauded students. The suit was later settled for $25 million.

According to Gleason, shortly thereafter, he got a call from Michael Cohen, Trump’s longtime personal lawyer, and “shared with him certain details” of the women’s accusations.

The letter was sent to Kimba Wood, the judge overseeing the records the FBI seized from Cohen last month as part of a criminal investigation.

Also Read: Trump Predicted NY Attorney General Eric Schneiderman’s Downfall 5 Years Ago: ‘Worse Than Spitzer or Weiner’

Gleason, who misspelled Schneiderman’s name throughout his letter, refrained from naming the women.

In September 2013, Trump attacked Schneiderman on Twitter, comparing him former New York Representative Anthony Weiner and former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer, who were both embroiled in sex scandals in the past.

“Weiner is gone, Spitzer gone — next will be lightweight A.G. Eric Schneiderman,” Trump wrote. “Is he a crook? Wait and see, worse than Spitzer or Weiner.”

Gleason told the Times that Trump’s tweet was a direct result of his conversation with Cohen.

Also Read: Donald Trump Jr Gloats After Eric Schneiderman Resignation

“That tweet that Trump sent out about Schneiderman,” Gleason said, “my conversation with Cohen happened shortly before that.”

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A New York lawyer says that he told President Donald Trump’s personal attorney, Michael Cohen, about accusations of abuse against then-New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman during a 2013 phone conversation, the New York Times reports.

In a letter Friday to the judge overseeing the Cohen investigation, attorney Peter Gleason asked the court to issue a protective order sealing any notes Cohen may have taken during their conversation. It’s unclear whether Cohen made any such notes. A lawyer for Cohen did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for clarification.

Gleason said that in 2012 and 2013 he was approached by two different women who claimed that Schneiderman was “sexually inappropriate” with them, and that he advised the women not to report what happened to prosecutors. Gleason discussed the matter with a retired New York Post columnist, Stephen Dunleavy, instead.

Gleason said that Dunleavy offered to talk about the issue with Trump. At the time, Schneiderman was engaged in legal action against Trump University over claims the school defrauded students. The suit was later settled for $25 million.

According to Gleason, shortly thereafter, he got a call from Michael Cohen, Trump’s longtime personal lawyer, and “shared with him certain details” of the women’s accusations.

The letter was sent to Kimba Wood, the judge overseeing the records the FBI seized from Cohen last month as part of a criminal investigation.

Gleason, who misspelled Schneiderman’s name throughout his letter, refrained from naming the women.

In September 2013, Trump attacked Schneiderman on Twitter, comparing him former New York Representative Anthony Weiner and former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer, who were both embroiled in sex scandals in the past.

“Weiner is gone, Spitzer gone — next will be lightweight A.G. Eric Schneiderman,” Trump wrote. “Is he a crook? Wait and see, worse than Spitzer or Weiner.”

Gleason told the Times that Trump’s tweet was a direct result of his conversation with Cohen.

“That tweet that Trump sent out about Schneiderman,” Gleason said, “my conversation with Cohen happened shortly before that.”

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Trump Predicted NY Attorney General Eric Schneiderman’s Downfall 5 Years Ago: ‘Worse Than Spitzer or Weiner’

Did President Trump predict the demise of Eric Schneiderman back in 2013?

The New York Attorney General resigned on Monday night just hours after being accused of physical violence against multiple women in a bombshell New Yorker story.

Back in 2013, Trump compared Schneiderman to two other New York Democrats whose careers were rocked by sex scandals: Eliot Spitzer, who resigned as governor, and Anthony Weiner, who left the U.S. House.

Also Read: Anti-Weinstein Prosecutor Eric Schneiderman Resigns After Accusations of Abuse Against 4 Women

“Weiner is gone, Spitzer is gone — next will be lightweight A.G. Eric Schneiderman. Is he a crook? Wait and see, worse than Spitzer or Weiner,” Trump tweeted on Sept. 11, 2013.

Weiner is gone, Spitzer is gone – next will be lightweight A.G. Eric Schneiderman. Is he a crook? Wait and see, worse than Spitzer or Weiner

– Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 11, 2013

Spitzer resigned in 2008 following a prostitution scandal, while Weiner represented New York’s 9th congressional district before sexting scandals led to a 21-month sentence and registration as a sex offender.

Just one month before Trump’s prescient tweet, Schneiderman had sued the future president over his Trump University, calling it fraudulent.

“In New York, we have laws against business fraud, we have laws against consumer fraud,” Schneiderman said on “Good Morning America” when asked about the lawsuit filed against Trump in 2013. “We have a law against running an illegal unlicensed university. This never was a university … it was really a fraud from beginning to end.”

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While announcing that his plan to step down on Tuesday, Schneiderman said in his resignation statement: “In the last several hours, serious allegations, which I strongly contest, have been made against me. While these allegations are unrelated to my professional conduct or the operations of the office, they will effectively prevent me from leading the office’s work at this critical time.”

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Schneiderman, who in February filed a civil rights lawsuit against Harvey Weinstein, was accused of abusing four women, including two who agreed to be named by the New Yorker, Michelle Manning Barish and Tanya Selvaratnam.

The women told the magazine that Schneiderman “repeatedly hit them, often after drinking, frequently in bed and never with their consent,” New Yorker writers Jane Mayer and Ronan Farrow reported on Monday.

Also Read: New York Attorney General Opens Civil Rights Investigation Into The Weinstein Company

Neither woman took the accusations to police at the time, “but both say that they eventually sought medical attention after having been slapped hard across the ear and face, and also choked,” the report stated.

Schneiderman defended his conduct as “role playing and other consensual sexual activity” undertaken “in the privacy of intimate relationships” in a statement prior to his resignation Monday night. He denied committing assault and said he has “never engaged in nonconsensual sex, which is a line I would not cross.”

His two other accusers remain anonymous.

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Did President Trump predict the demise of Eric Schneiderman back in 2013?

The New York Attorney General resigned on Monday night just hours after being accused of physical violence against multiple women in a bombshell New Yorker story.

Back in 2013, Trump compared Schneiderman to two other New York Democrats whose careers were rocked by sex scandals: Eliot Spitzer, who resigned as governor, and Anthony Weiner, who left the U.S. House.

“Weiner is gone, Spitzer is gone — next will be lightweight A.G. Eric Schneiderman. Is he a crook? Wait and see, worse than Spitzer or Weiner,” Trump tweeted on Sept. 11, 2013.

Spitzer resigned in 2008 following a prostitution scandal, while Weiner represented New York’s 9th congressional district before sexting scandals led to a 21-month sentence and registration as a sex offender.

Just one month before Trump’s prescient tweet, Schneiderman had sued the future president over his Trump University, calling it fraudulent.

“In New York, we have laws against business fraud, we have laws against consumer fraud,” Schneiderman said on “Good Morning America” when asked about the lawsuit filed against Trump in 2013. “We have a law against running an illegal unlicensed university. This never was a university … it was really a fraud from beginning to end.”

While announcing that his plan to step down on Tuesday, Schneiderman said in his resignation statement: “In the last several hours, serious allegations, which I strongly contest, have been made against me. While these allegations are unrelated to my professional conduct or the operations of the office, they will effectively prevent me from leading the office’s work at this critical time.”

Schneiderman, who in February filed a civil rights lawsuit against Harvey Weinstein, was accused of abusing four women, including two who agreed to be named by the New Yorker, Michelle Manning Barish and Tanya Selvaratnam.

The women told the magazine that Schneiderman “repeatedly hit them, often after drinking, frequently in bed and never with their consent,” New Yorker writers Jane Mayer and Ronan Farrow reported on Monday.

Neither woman took the accusations to police at the time, “but both say that they eventually sought medical attention after having been slapped hard across the ear and face, and also choked,” the report stated.

Schneiderman defended his conduct as “role playing and other consensual sexual activity” undertaken “in the privacy of intimate relationships” in a statement prior to his resignation Monday night. He denied committing assault and said he has “never engaged in nonconsensual sex, which is a line I would not cross.”

His two other accusers remain anonymous.

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Anthony Weiner Sentenced to 21 Months in Sexting Case

Anthony Weiner, the former New York congressman and husband of Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin, was sentenced to 21 months in prison for “sexting” a teenage girl. The Associated Press reported that Weiner must report to prison on Nov. 6. Weiner’s case got enmeshed in the closing days of the 2016 presidential race, when then-FBI… Read more »

Anthony Weiner, the former New York congressman and husband of Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin, was sentenced to 21 months in prison for “sexting” a teenage girl. The Associated Press reported that Weiner must report to prison on Nov. 6. Weiner’s case got enmeshed in the closing days of the 2016 presidential race, when then-FBI... Read more »

Anthony Weiner Gets 21 Months in Prison for Sexting With a Minor

Former US Representative Anthony Weiner has been sentenced to 21 months in prison for sexting with a minor, according to the Associated Press.

The 53-year-old pleaded guilty in May to sexting a 15-year-old girl. In court on Monday, he was sentenced. He must surrender to prison officials by Nov. 6.

Weiner cried Monday as he read from a written statement in Manhattan federal court, saying he hit “rock bottom” and that he was “a very sick man for a very long time.”

“I have a sickness, but I do not have an excuse,” he added.

Also Read: Stephen Colbert Compares Fox News’ Eric Bolling to Anthony Weiner (Video)

The former politician’s troubles began in 2011 when he sent an explicit photo of himself to another woman via his Twitter account. He resigned from his seat after he admitted to sending “messages and photos of an explicit nature with about six women” over a period of about three years.

In 2013, he attempted to return to politics and was running for the New York City mayoral seat, but was caught up in another sexting scandal. He was accused of sending explicit photos to a woman under the name “Carlos Danger” and was engaging in an online affair.

The photo and alias turned Weiner into a walking punchline for late-night comics.

Also Read: ‘Weiner’ Documentary Lands Just in Time for October Surprise – Here’s Our Review

The scandals continued until Huma Abedin, one of Hillary Clinton’s closest aids and Weiner’s wife, filed for divorce earlier this year after photos surfaced that indicated he was still engaging in sexting with other women.

He was also investigated by child welfare services after he was caught sending sexually-charged selfies with his young son lying next to him last summer.

Many believed the case ended up affecting the 2016 presidential election. The investigation resulted in the FBI reopening the infamous case surrounding Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server after authorities found potentially classified emails on a laptop Weiner shared with Abedin. Many Clinton supporters, and Clinton herself, have blamed former FBI Director James Comey reopening the investigation for the loss to Donald Trump.

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Former US Representative Anthony Weiner has been sentenced to 21 months in prison for sexting with a minor, according to the Associated Press.

The 53-year-old pleaded guilty in May to sexting a 15-year-old girl. In court on Monday, he was sentenced. He must surrender to prison officials by Nov. 6.

Weiner cried Monday as he read from a written statement in Manhattan federal court, saying he hit “rock bottom” and that he was “a very sick man for a very long time.”

“I have a sickness, but I do not have an excuse,” he added.

The former politician’s troubles began in 2011 when he sent an explicit photo of himself to another woman via his Twitter account. He resigned from his seat after he admitted to sending “messages and photos of an explicit nature with about six women” over a period of about three years.

In 2013, he attempted to return to politics and was running for the New York City mayoral seat, but was caught up in another sexting scandal. He was accused of sending explicit photos to a woman under the name “Carlos Danger” and was engaging in an online affair.

The photo and alias turned Weiner into a walking punchline for late-night comics.

The scandals continued until Huma Abedin, one of Hillary Clinton’s closest aids and Weiner’s wife, filed for divorce earlier this year after photos surfaced that indicated he was still engaging in sexting with other women.

He was also investigated by child welfare services after he was caught sending sexually-charged selfies with his young son lying next to him last summer.

Many believed the case ended up affecting the 2016 presidential election. The investigation resulted in the FBI reopening the infamous case surrounding Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server after authorities found potentially classified emails on a laptop Weiner shared with Abedin. Many Clinton supporters, and Clinton herself, have blamed former FBI Director James Comey reopening the investigation for the loss to Donald Trump.

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Anthony Weiner Will Plead Guilty to Sexting With 15-Year-Old Girl

Anthony Weiner will plead guilty to a single charge of transferring obscene material to a minor after getting caught sexting with a 15-year-old girl, according to the New York Times.

Weiner, the former Democratic congressman who is married to top Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin, saw his political career derail because of a series of bizarre sexting scandals. He is expected to appear in a federal courtroom in Manhattan on Friday to enter the guilty plea.

A source told the Times that Weiner turned himself into the FBI on Friday. A judge will decide Weiner’s fate, but the charge carries a wide range of possibilities. He could potentially avoid prison, but could also be sentenced to 10 years behind bars.

Also Read: Julian Assange: Sweden Drops Rape Investigation Against WikiLeaks Founder

Weiner will likely end up as a registered sex offender, according to the Times.

The sexting investigation resulted in the FBI reopening the infamous case surrounding Clinton’s use of a private email server after authorities found potentially classified emails on a laptop Weiner shared with Abedin. Many Clinton supporters have blamed former FBI Director James Comey reopening the investigation for the Democratic candidate’s loss to Donald Trump.

Weiner famously quit Congress in 2011 when he was caught sending other women sexually explicit messages. He was also investigated by child welfare services after he was caught sending sexually-charged selfies with his young son lying next to him last summer.

Back in 2013, an attempt to become New York City’s mayor was derailed when news broke that his web alias, Carlos Danger, carried out a lengthy online affair with another woman.

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Anthony Weiner will plead guilty to a single charge of transferring obscene material to a minor after getting caught sexting with a 15-year-old girl, according to the New York Times.

Weiner, the former Democratic congressman who is married to top Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin, saw his political career derail because of a series of bizarre sexting scandals. He is expected to appear in a federal courtroom in Manhattan on Friday to enter the guilty plea.

A source told the Times that Weiner turned himself into the FBI on Friday. A judge will decide Weiner’s fate, but the charge carries a wide range of possibilities. He could potentially avoid prison, but could also be sentenced to 10 years behind bars.

Weiner will likely end up as a registered sex offender, according to the Times.

The sexting investigation resulted in the FBI reopening the infamous case surrounding Clinton’s use of a private email server after authorities found potentially classified emails on a laptop Weiner shared with Abedin. Many Clinton supporters have blamed former FBI Director James Comey reopening the investigation for the Democratic candidate’s loss to Donald Trump.

Weiner famously quit Congress in 2011 when he was caught sending other women sexually explicit messages. He was also investigated by child welfare services after he was caught sending sexually-charged selfies with his young son lying next to him last summer.

Back in 2013, an attempt to become New York City’s mayor was derailed when news broke that his web alias, Carlos Danger, carried out a lengthy online affair with another woman.

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James Comey Timeline: Events That Led to FBI Director’s Firing (Photos)

For the first time since 1993, a U.S. president has fired a director of the FBI. Comey’s last year as head of the Bureau has been wrought with controversy, as Democrats and Republicans alike criticized him for his handling of the FBI’s investigations into Hillary Clinton’s emails and possible connections between Donald Trump’s campaign and Russia. Here’s how we got to this point:

July 2013: Disgraced former NY Congressman Anthony Weiner sees his campaign for New York mayor derailed when screenshots of explicit conversations between him and several women are leaked. His wife, Huma Abedin, who was deputy chief of staff to Hillary Clinton while she was Secretary of State, stands by him.

September 2013: President Barack Obama appoints James Comey as FBI Director.

April 2015: Hillary Clinton announces her campaign for the presidency just weeks after The New York Times reported that she used a personal email server as Secretary of State. Abedin is named vice-chairwoman of her campaign.

July 2016: After investigating Clinton’s emails, Comey announces that the FBI does not recommend charging Clinton in connection to the personal server. Two days later, Comey is questioned by a Republican-led House Committee about his recommendation

August 2016: Anthony Weiner and Huma Abedin announce their separation after reports surface that Weiner had sent explicit text messages to another woman.

September 2016: Reports surface that Weiner had sent illicit text messages to a 15-year-old girl in North Carolina, prompting a federal investigation. During the investigation, authorities seize a laptop belonging to Weiner and Abedin.

October 2016: Comey sends a letter to Congress informing members that Abedin’s laptop may contain emails linked to the Clinton investigation.

November 6, 2016: Comey writes another letter saying that nothing new was found on Abedin’s laptop, with Newsweek reporting that most of the emails found were ones forwarded by Abedin so she could print them. Two days after Comey sends the second letter, Hillary Clinton loses the presidential election to Donald Trump.

March 2017: Comey reveals during a House Intelligence Committee hearing that the FBI is performing an investigation into possible connections between the Kremlin and members of Trump’s campaign.

May 3, 2017: Comey testifies in Congress again, this time before a Senate Committee about the details of the FBI’s investigation into Clinton’s email server. He says that Abedin had forwarded “forwarded hundreds and thousands of e-mails, some of which contain classified information” to Weiner to print out of convenience.

May 9, 2017:  ProPublica and the Associated Press report that Comey had exaggerated the number of emails found in the laptop and that none of the emails were classified when sent. Later that day, Comey is fired from his position by Donald Trump.

For the first time since 1993, a U.S. president has fired a director of the FBI. Comey’s last year as head of the Bureau has been wrought with controversy, as Democrats and Republicans alike criticized him for his handling of the FBI’s investigations into Hillary Clinton’s emails and possible connections between Donald Trump’s campaign and Russia. Here’s how we got to this point:

July 2013: Disgraced former NY Congressman Anthony Weiner sees his campaign for New York mayor derailed when screenshots of explicit conversations between him and several women are leaked. His wife, Huma Abedin, who was deputy chief of staff to Hillary Clinton while she was Secretary of State, stands by him.

September 2013: President Barack Obama appoints James Comey as FBI Director.

April 2015: Hillary Clinton announces her campaign for the presidency just weeks after The New York Times reported that she used a personal email server as Secretary of State. Abedin is named vice-chairwoman of her campaign.

July 2016: After investigating Clinton’s emails, Comey announces that the FBI does not recommend charging Clinton in connection to the personal server. Two days later, Comey is questioned by a Republican-led House Committee about his recommendation

August 2016: Anthony Weiner and Huma Abedin announce their separation after reports surface that Weiner had sent explicit text messages to another woman.

September 2016: Reports surface that Weiner had sent illicit text messages to a 15-year-old girl in North Carolina, prompting a federal investigation. During the investigation, authorities seize a laptop belonging to Weiner and Abedin.

October 2016: Comey sends a letter to Congress informing members that Abedin’s laptop may contain emails linked to the Clinton investigation.

November 6, 2016: Comey writes another letter saying that nothing new was found on Abedin’s laptop, with Newsweek reporting that most of the emails found were ones forwarded by Abedin so she could print them. Two days after Comey sends the second letter, Hillary Clinton loses the presidential election to Donald Trump.

March 2017: Comey reveals during a House Intelligence Committee hearing that the FBI is performing an investigation into possible connections between the Kremlin and members of Trump’s campaign.

May 3, 2017: Comey testifies in Congress again, this time before a Senate Committee about the details of the FBI’s investigation into Clinton’s email server. He says that Abedin had forwarded “forwarded hundreds and thousands of e-mails, some of which contain classified information” to Weiner to print out of convenience.

May 9, 2017:  ProPublica and the Associated Press report that Comey had exaggerated the number of emails found in the laptop and that none of the emails were classified when sent. Later that day, Comey is fired from his position by Donald Trump.

James Comey Says He’s ‘Mildly Nauseous’ Over Potentially Swaying Election

In front of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Wednesday, FBI Director James Comey said he doesn’t regret announcing a new investigation into presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s emails shortly before the 2016 election.

“Look, this is terrible. It makes me mildly nauseous to think that we might have had some impact on the election,” Comes said, according to CNN. “But honestly, it wouldn’t change the decision.”

Senator Dianne Feinstein from California asked Comey why he thought it was “necessary” to make the announcement to Congress without all the proper information.

“Why was it necessary to announce 11 days before a presidential election that you were opening an investigation on a new computer without any knowledge of what was in that computer, why didn’t you just do the investigation as you would normally with no public announcement?” she asked.

Also Read: Hillary Clinton Says She Would Have Won If Not for Comey’s Letter, WikiLeaks

Comey said that when looking at Anthony Weiner’s computer for the first time, investigators saw thousands of Clinton’s emails, including what they thought would be the missing emails from her first three months as Secretary of State. The investigators and the Justice Department agreed that they should get a search warrant.

The search was related to an investigation into Weiner’s possible inappropriate communications with a minor. He was married to top Clinton aide Huma Abedin.

That’s when Comey was faced with a tough choice.

“I’ve lived my entire career by the tradition that if you could possibly avoid it, you avoid any action in the run-up to an election that might have an impact,” he said.

Also Read: Liberal Media Bias Explained? 72 Percent of News Jobs Are in Counties Hillary Clinton Won, Study Finds

Comey’s argument comes down to how he weighed his two options, which he agreed were both horrible. He ultimately decided that not announcing a significant change in an already-closed investigation would be “catastrophic,” or the lesser of two evils.

Comey added that even with the benefit of hindsight, he would still make the same decision. He added that while there was enormous debate in his ranks, they concluded that not doing so would be “the death of the FBI as an independent institution.”

“You took an enormous gamble,” Feinstein said. “The gamble was that there was something there that would invalidate her candidacy and there wasn’t. So one has to look at that action and say ‘did it affect the campaign?’ and I think most people who have looked at it say yes.”

Also Read: Hillary Clinton Apologized to Obama After Trump’s Victory and More Reveals From ‘Shattered’

Clinton agreed with Feinstein. She told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour at a Women for Women event that the last-minute interference had a significant impact on her campaign.

“If the election had been on October 27, I would be your president,” she said.

“It wasn’t a perfect campaign — there is no such thing — but I was on the way to winning until a combination of Jim Comey’s letter on October 28 and Russian WikiLeaks raised doubts in the minds of people who were inclined to vote for me and got scared off,” she added.

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In front of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Wednesday, FBI Director James Comey said he doesn’t regret announcing a new investigation into presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s emails shortly before the 2016 election.

“Look, this is terrible. It makes me mildly nauseous to think that we might have had some impact on the election,” Comes said, according to CNN. “But honestly, it wouldn’t change the decision.”

Senator Dianne Feinstein from California asked Comey why he thought it was “necessary” to make the announcement to Congress without all the proper information.

“Why was it necessary to announce 11 days before a presidential election that you were opening an investigation on a new computer without any knowledge of what was in that computer, why didn’t you just do the investigation as you would normally with no public announcement?” she asked.

Comey said that when looking at Anthony Weiner’s computer for the first time, investigators saw thousands of Clinton’s emails, including what they thought would be the missing emails from her first three months as Secretary of State. The investigators and the Justice Department agreed that they should get a search warrant.

The search was related to an investigation into Weiner’s possible inappropriate communications with a minor. He was married to top Clinton aide Huma Abedin.

That’s when Comey was faced with a tough choice.

“I’ve lived my entire career by the tradition that if you could possibly avoid it, you avoid any action in the run-up to an election that might have an impact,” he said.

Comey’s argument comes down to how he weighed his two options, which he agreed were both horrible. He ultimately decided that not announcing a significant change in an already-closed investigation would be “catastrophic,” or the lesser of two evils.

Comey added that even with the benefit of hindsight, he would still make the same decision. He added that while there was enormous debate in his ranks, they concluded that not doing so would be “the death of the FBI as an independent institution.”

“You took an enormous gamble,” Feinstein said. “The gamble was that there was something there that would invalidate her candidacy and there wasn’t. So one has to look at that action and say ‘did it affect the campaign?’ and I think most people who have looked at it say yes.”

Clinton agreed with Feinstein. She told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour at a Women for Women event that the last-minute interference had a significant impact on her campaign.

“If the election had been on October 27, I would be your president,” she said.

“It wasn’t a perfect campaign — there is no such thing — but I was on the way to winning until a combination of Jim Comey’s letter on October 28 and Russian WikiLeaks raised doubts in the minds of people who were inclined to vote for me and got scared off,” she added.

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