Tony Winner Anika Noni Rose Sets Musical Theater Return With ‘Carmen Jones’

EXCLUSIVE: Anika Noni Rose is coming back to musical theater. The actress will star in an Off Broadway production of Carmen Jones, her first appearance in a musical since winning a Tony Award for 2004’s Broadway production of Tony Kushner’s Caroline, or Change.
Directing for the Classic Stage Company will be CSC‘s Artistic Director John Doyle, with choreography by Bill T. Jones. Beginning a limited engagement Friday, June 8, the production marks the first major New York…

EXCLUSIVE: Anika Noni Rose is coming back to musical theater. The actress will star in an Off Broadway production of Carmen Jones, her first appearance in a musical since winning a Tony Award for 2004’s Broadway production of Tony Kushner’s Caroline, or Change. Directing for the Classic Stage Company will be CSC's Artistic Director John Doyle, with choreography by Bill T. Jones. Beginning a limited engagement Friday, June 8, the production marks the first major New York…

BET Cancels ‘The Quad’ After 2 Seasons

“The Quad” has been canceled by BET less than week after its Season 2 finale, a spokesperson for the network told TheWrap Monday.

Led by Anika Noni Rose, the scripted drama from executive producer Felicia D. Henderson was a true-to-life drama about HBCU (historically black college or university) culture and relationships. The series also starred Sean Blakemore, Jasmine Guy, Ruben Santiago-Hudson.

The show premiered on BET with a two-hour pilot in February 2017. Last November, it was renewed for a sophomore installment that ran from Jan. 23 – April 3.

Also Read: BET’s ‘The Quad’ Gets January Return, Season 2 Guest Stars Revealed (Exclusive)

“The Quad’s second season picked up in the spring semester, with Georgia A&M’s survival as an independent, historically Black university hanging in a precarious balance as the driven Dr. Eva Fletcher (Rose) struggled to raise capital for the nearly bankrupt institution.

Rapper and producer Antwan “Big Boi” Patton Sr., RonReaco Lee (“Survivor’s Remorse,” “Let’s Get Together”), Sheryl Lee Ralph (“One Mississippi,” “Ray Donovan”) and Debbi Morgan (“Power,” “All My Children”) all appeared in recurring guest roles during the second season season, alongside Jasmine Guy (“A Different World,” “School Daze”).

Also Read: ‘Being Mary Jane’ to End With 2-Hour Movie on BET

The news of “The Quad”s cancelation comes after BET decided to wrap the Gabrielle Union-led drama series “Being Mary Jane” last fall.

Variety was first to report “The Quad”s cancellation.

Related stories from TheWrap:

BET’s ‘The Quad’ Gets January Return, Season 2 Guest Stars Revealed (Exclusive)

‘The Quad’ Star Anika Noni Rose Talks Gender Clashes on College Campus (Video)

‘The Quad’ Star Anika Noni Rose Exclusive StudioWrap Portraits (Photos)

“The Quad” has been canceled by BET less than week after its Season 2 finale, a spokesperson for the network told TheWrap Monday.

Led by Anika Noni Rose, the scripted drama from executive producer Felicia D. Henderson was a true-to-life drama about HBCU (historically black college or university) culture and relationships. The series also starred Sean Blakemore, Jasmine Guy, Ruben Santiago-Hudson.

The show premiered on BET with a two-hour pilot in February 2017. Last November, it was renewed for a sophomore installment that ran from Jan. 23 – April 3.

“The Quad’s second season picked up in the spring semester, with Georgia A&M’s survival as an independent, historically Black university hanging in a precarious balance as the driven Dr. Eva Fletcher (Rose) struggled to raise capital for the nearly bankrupt institution.

Rapper and producer Antwan “Big Boi” Patton Sr., RonReaco Lee (“Survivor’s Remorse,” “Let’s Get Together”), Sheryl Lee Ralph (“One Mississippi,” “Ray Donovan”) and Debbi Morgan (“Power,” “All My Children”) all appeared in recurring guest roles during the second season season, alongside Jasmine Guy (“A Different World,” “School Daze”).

The news of “The Quad”s cancelation comes after BET decided to wrap the Gabrielle Union-led drama series “Being Mary Jane” last fall.

Variety was first to report “The Quad”s cancellation.

Related stories from TheWrap:

BET's 'The Quad' Gets January Return, Season 2 Guest Stars Revealed (Exclusive)

'The Quad' Star Anika Noni Rose Talks Gender Clashes on College Campus (Video)

'The Quad' Star Anika Noni Rose Exclusive StudioWrap Portraits (Photos)

‘The Quad’ Canceled At BET After Two Seasons

BET has canceled drama series The Quad less than a week after its second-season finale, a network spokesperson confirmed to Deadline.
Created by Felicia D. Henderson and Charles Holland, The Quad starred Anika Noni Rose as Dr. Eva Fletcher, a newly elected President of the fictional Georgia A&M University. Ruben Santiago-Hudson, Sean Blakemore and Jasmine Guy also starred. The series premiered February 1, 2017 with a two-hour pilot and was renewed for a second season that…

BET has canceled drama series The Quad less than a week after its second-season finale, a network spokesperson confirmed to Deadline. Created by Felicia D. Henderson and Charles Holland, The Quad starred Anika Noni Rose as Dr. Eva Fletcher, a newly elected President of the fictional Georgia A&M University. Ruben Santiago-Hudson, Sean Blakemore and Jasmine Guy also starred. The series premiered February 1, 2017 with a two-hour pilot and was renewed for a second season that…

#BuryYourGays: 11 LGBT TV Characters Killed Off in 2017, From ‘Kingdom’ to ‘The Walking Dead’ (Photos)

Nate (Nick Jonas), “Kingdom”: After finally coming out to his father (Frank Grillo) in the show’s penultimate episode, Nate is shot and killed after getting into a fight with a bouncer.

Martha (Laura Wilson), “The Handmaid’s Tale”: Ofglen/Emily (Alexis Bledel) and her lover are both put on trial for “gender treachery,” but only Martha is sentenced to execution by hanging for her homosexuality.

Mr. Kaplan (Susan Blommaert), “The Blacklist”: Mr. Kaplan narrowly escaped death several times before, but the “Blacklist” villain took a dive off a bridge when cornered by police at the end of Season 4.

Mia (Ashley Greene), “Rogue”: Betrayed by her ex-girlfriend Sadie (Eve Harlow), Mia is shot in the back and left for dead after selling a stolen microchip for $10 million.

Eleanor (Hannah New), “Black Sails”: The former pirate ally was killed by a Spanish soldier during an invasion engineered by her husband, the British governor of the Bahamas (Luke Roberts).

Eric (Jordan Woods-Robinson), “The Walking Dead”: One-half of “TWD’s” last surviving gay couple, Eric took a shot to the gut in Season 8, dying in his partner’s arms.

Brett (Cody Saintgnue), “Teen Wolf”: Brett’s fluid sexuality was only briefly hinted at before the young werewolf was run down by a hunter’s car in Season 6.

Edward Drummond (Leo Suter), “Victoria”: Like his real-life counterpart, Edward died taking a bullet for his Prime Minister, but the ITV drama took some creative liberty by giving him a doomed gay romance with Lord Alfred Paget before his death.

Jukebox (Anika Noni Rose), “Power”: After the crooked cop takes Ghost’s (Omari Hardwick) son hostage, she’s double-crossed and gunned down by Kanan (50 Cent).

Related stories from TheWrap:

Univision, Telemundo and UniMas Lagged in LGBT Characters This Year, GLAAD Study Finds

LGBTQ Characters on TV Reach All-Time High, GLAAD Reports

Stars Speak Up on Spirit Day, Against LGBTQ Bullies: ‘Take a Stand’

Nate (Nick Jonas), “Kingdom”: After finally coming out to his father (Frank Grillo) in the show’s penultimate episode, Nate is shot and killed after getting into a fight with a bouncer.

Martha (Laura Wilson), “The Handmaid’s Tale”: Ofglen/Emily (Alexis Bledel) and her lover are both put on trial for “gender treachery,” but only Martha is sentenced to execution by hanging for her homosexuality.

Mr. Kaplan (Susan Blommaert), “The Blacklist”: Mr. Kaplan narrowly escaped death several times before, but the “Blacklist” villain took a dive off a bridge when cornered by police at the end of Season 4.

Mia (Ashley Greene), “Rogue”: Betrayed by her ex-girlfriend Sadie (Eve Harlow), Mia is shot in the back and left for dead after selling a stolen microchip for $10 million.

Eleanor (Hannah New), “Black Sails”: The former pirate ally was killed by a Spanish soldier during an invasion engineered by her husband, the British governor of the Bahamas (Luke Roberts).

Eric (Jordan Woods-Robinson), “The Walking Dead”: One-half of “TWD’s” last surviving gay couple, Eric took a shot to the gut in Season 8, dying in his partner’s arms.

Brett (Cody Saintgnue), “Teen Wolf”: Brett’s fluid sexuality was only briefly hinted at before the young werewolf was run down by a hunter’s car in Season 6.

Edward Drummond (Leo Suter), “Victoria”: Like his real-life counterpart, Edward died taking a bullet for his Prime Minister, but the ITV drama took some creative liberty by giving him a doomed gay romance with Lord Alfred Paget before his death.

Jukebox (Anika Noni Rose), “Power”: After the crooked cop takes Ghost’s (Omari Hardwick) son hostage, she’s double-crossed and gunned down by Kanan (50 Cent).

Related stories from TheWrap:

Univision, Telemundo and UniMas Lagged in LGBT Characters This Year, GLAAD Study Finds

LGBTQ Characters on TV Reach All-Time High, GLAAD Reports

Stars Speak Up on Spirit Day, Against LGBTQ Bullies: 'Take a Stand'

BET’s ‘The Quad’ Gets January Return, Season 2 Guest Stars Revealed (Exclusive)

BET’s “The Quad” will return for Season 2 on Jan. 23, 2018, the network announced on Tuesday.

Led by Anika Noni Rose, the scripted drama from executive producer Felicia D. Henderson is a true-to-life drama about HBCU (historically black college or university) culture and relationships.

The show’s second season will pick up in spring semester, with Georgia A&M’s survival as an independent, historically Black university hanging in a precarious balance as the driven Dr. Eva Fletcher (Rose) struggles to raise capital for the nearly bankrupt institution. If she fails, the school may be forced to join Georgia’s large, public and predominantly white university system in order to keep its doors open.

Also Read: ‘The Mane Event’: How BET Ruined the Royal Wedding, According to Twitter

Rapper and producer Antwan “Big Boi” Patton Sr., RonReaco Lee (“Survivor’s Remorse,” “Let’s Get Together”), Sheryl Lee Ralph (“One Mississippi,” “Ray Donovan”) and Debbi Morgan (“Power,” “All My Children”) are all slated to appear in recurring guest roles this season, alongside Jasmine Guy (“A Different World,” “School Daze”).

Patton will play Lenny Jenkins, the over-zealous father of the latest high school quarterback phenomenon.

Lee will reprise his role as Southwestern Delta University’s executive band director and Cecil Diamond’s (Ruben Santiago-Hudson) chief rival, Clive Taylor. Ralph will guest star as Ula Pettiway, Georgia A&M faculty member Carlton Pettiway’s wife, and Morgan will play Dr. Helen Chambers.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘The Mane Event’: How BET Ruined the Royal Wedding, According to Twitter

‘Being Mary Jane’ to End With 2-Hour Movie on BET

Eminem Calls Out Donald Trump During BET Hip Hop Awards Cypher (Video)

BET’s “The Quad” will return for Season 2 on Jan. 23, 2018, the network announced on Tuesday.

Led by Anika Noni Rose, the scripted drama from executive producer Felicia D. Henderson is a true-to-life drama about HBCU (historically black college or university) culture and relationships.

The show’s second season will pick up in spring semester, with Georgia A&M’s survival as an independent, historically Black university hanging in a precarious balance as the driven Dr. Eva Fletcher (Rose) struggles to raise capital for the nearly bankrupt institution. If she fails, the school may be forced to join Georgia’s large, public and predominantly white university system in order to keep its doors open.

Rapper and producer Antwan “Big Boi” Patton Sr., RonReaco Lee (“Survivor’s Remorse,” “Let’s Get Together”), Sheryl Lee Ralph (“One Mississippi,” “Ray Donovan”) and Debbi Morgan (“Power,” “All My Children”) are all slated to appear in recurring guest roles this season, alongside Jasmine Guy (“A Different World,” “School Daze”).

Patton will play Lenny Jenkins, the over-zealous father of the latest high school quarterback phenomenon.

Lee will reprise his role as Southwestern Delta University’s executive band director and Cecil Diamond’s (Ruben Santiago-Hudson) chief rival, Clive Taylor. Ralph will guest star as Ula Pettiway, Georgia A&M faculty member Carlton Pettiway’s wife, and Morgan will play Dr. Helen Chambers.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'The Mane Event': How BET Ruined the Royal Wedding, According to Twitter

'Being Mary Jane' to End With 2-Hour Movie on BET

Eminem Calls Out Donald Trump During BET Hip Hop Awards Cypher (Video)

Alyssa Milano Kicks Off #MeToo Crusade for Victims of Sexual Harassment

Alyssa Milano started the social media movement #MeToo Sunday afternoon to shed light on the widespread problem of sexual assault, harassment and rape.

The crusade Sunday began when she tweeted a note from a friend that said, “If all the women who have been sexually harassed or assaulted wrote ‘Me too’ as a status, we might give people a sense of the magnitude of the problem.”

Milano added, “If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet.” Social media flood gates opened, with thousands replying “#MeToo,” causing it to trend.

Also Read: Scotland Yard Adds Three Sexual Assault Claims to Harvey Weinstein Investigation

If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet. pic.twitter.com/k2oeCiUf9n

— Alyssa Milano (@Alyssa_Milano) October 15, 2017

All this began after several women came forward to accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault, harassment and rape, including Milano’s “Charmed” co-star Rose McGowan. A representative for Weinstein has stated, “Any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein. Mr. Weinstein has further confirmed that there were never any acts of retaliation against any women for refusing his advances.”

Also Read: France to Strip Harvey Weinstein of Legion of Honor

In an essay for PatriotNotPartisan.com last week, Milano wrote that while she is “sickened and angered” over accusations of Weinstein’s abuse of power, she is “ecstatic” that it has opened up a dialogue around sexual harassment, objectification and degradation of women.

“To the women who have suffered any form of abuse of power, I stand beside you. To the women who have come forward against a system that is designed to keep you silent, I stand in awe of you and appreciate you and your fortitude,” she wrote. “Your strength will inspire others.”

Me too

– Anna Paquin (@AnnaPaquin) October 15, 2017

Me too https://t.co/ScX67Kmmiy

– Debra Messing (@DebraMessing) October 15, 2017

Me, too #MeToo

– Anika Noni Rose (@AnikaNoniRose) October 15, 2017

Me too. I don’t know if means anything coming from a gay man but it’s happened. Multiple times.

– Javier Muñoz (@JMunozActor) October 15, 2017

Related stories from TheWrap:

Rose McGowan Twitter Suspension Sparks #WomenBoycottTwitter Protest

Rose McGowan Clarifies: Harvey Weinstein ‘Raped Me’

Rose McGowan Launches Petition to Dissolve The Weinstein Company

Courtney Love: ‘I Was Banned by CAA for Speaking Out Against Harvey Weinstein’

Woody Allen Hopes Harvey Weinstein Revelations Won’t ‘Lead to a Witch Hunt Atmosphere’

Scotland Yard Adds Three Sexual Assault Claims to Harvey Weinstein Investigation

Alyssa Milano started the social media movement #MeToo Sunday afternoon to shed light on the widespread problem of sexual assault, harassment and rape.

The crusade Sunday began when she tweeted a note from a friend that said, “If all the women who have been sexually harassed or assaulted wrote ‘Me too’ as a status, we might give people a sense of the magnitude of the problem.”

Milano added, “If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet.” Social media flood gates opened, with thousands replying “#MeToo,” causing it to trend.

All this began after several women came forward to accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault, harassment and rape, including Milano’s “Charmed” co-star Rose McGowan. A representative for Weinstein has stated, “Any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein. Mr. Weinstein has further confirmed that there were never any acts of retaliation against any women for refusing his advances.”

In an essay for PatriotNotPartisan.com last week, Milano wrote that while she is “sickened and angered” over accusations of Weinstein’s abuse of power, she is “ecstatic” that it has opened up a dialogue around sexual harassment, objectification and degradation of women.

“To the women who have suffered any form of abuse of power, I stand beside you. To the women who have come forward against a system that is designed to keep you silent, I stand in awe of you and appreciate you and your fortitude,” she wrote. “Your strength will inspire others.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Rose McGowan Twitter Suspension Sparks #WomenBoycottTwitter Protest

Rose McGowan Clarifies: Harvey Weinstein 'Raped Me'

Rose McGowan Launches Petition to Dissolve The Weinstein Company

Courtney Love: 'I Was Banned by CAA for Speaking Out Against Harvey Weinstein'

Woody Allen Hopes Harvey Weinstein Revelations Won't 'Lead to a Witch Hunt Atmosphere'

Scotland Yard Adds Three Sexual Assault Claims to Harvey Weinstein Investigation

‘Everything, Everything’ Review: Girl in the Plastic Bubble Falls for Boy Next Door

“Everything, Everything” is an updated, gender-reversed and more engaging version of “The Boy in the Plastic Bubble.” Hollywood loves stories of young pretty people with terminal illnesses. Think “Me and Earl and the Dying Girl,” “The Fault in Our Stars,” “Dying Young,” “Love Story,” and many more. So it’s no surprise that Nicola Yoon’s 2015 YA novel was adapted for the screen.

The lead actors are attractive and charismatic and give nuanced performances. Unfortunately, the dialogue they are given to speak is often trite and too many plot strands are unconvincing.

Amandla Stenberg (“The Hunger Games”) brings an appealing openness to the role of Maddy, a smart and imaginative 18-year-old girl with a rare autoimmune disease known as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Because almost anything could kill her, Maddy is not allowed outdoors.

See Photos: 17 Breakout Movie Stars For 2017, From Amandla Stenberg to Patrick Schwarzenegger

She’s essentially sealed into her home, which is lavishly and tastefully decorated by her mother (Anika Noni Rose), who is also a doctor. Her mother has designed their home to bring the outdoors as close to inside as possible. If you had to live stuck inside forever, this would be the house to do it in.

We get very little sense of the 17 years that came before the movie starts. It would seem the charming, sweet and astoundingly well-adjusted Maddy never had friends, which is rather hard to believe given her warmth and the readiness of teens to connect electronically and virtually with her. It’s as if Maddy just sprung up in her late teens, allergic to all outdoors but relatively content with her life — until the appearance of the cute boy next door.

That boy is the slightly goofy, handsome and soulful Olly, affably played by Nick Robinson (“Kings of Summer”). On the day he moves in, he takes one look at Maddy and a mutual crush is born.

Also Read: George MacKay Joins Amandla Stenberg in WWII Love Story ‘Where Hands Touch’

They gaze at each other across reflective surfaces; conveniently, her bedroom window looks directly into his room. They text. A lot. And because constant texting is inherently un-cinematic, director Stella Meghie (“Jean of the Joneses”) invents a theatrical device to bring their text conversations to vivid life: Maddy is taking an architecture class online and has constructed a rather elaborate miniature model of a diner. She imagines a more normal scenario for their banter — the two of them inside that diner, getting to know each other naturally. It is definitely more viewer-friendly, but if the movie is trying to illuminate what it feels like to live forever trapped indoors, then it serves as more of an arty distraction.

And speaking of distraction, the story undermines itself by violating its own rules. Or changing them as it goes along. Initially, the only people allowed into their home are her mother, a kindly nurse (Ana de la Reguera,”Narcos”) and the nurse’s teenage daughter (Danube Hermosillo). They — and anything else from the outside world — supposedly go through a de-contamination process before entering. Until they don’t. What “Everything, Everything” boils down to is a wobbly sense of realism that defies its own established constraints and features a twist that strains credulity.

The script, by J. Mills Goodloe (“The Age of Adaline”), is hampered by such banal lines as: “I want to experience what it’s like to be alive,” and “I’m willing to sacrifice everything just to live one perfect day.”

On the plus side, director Meghie honors the original story’s treatment of Maddy as a mixed-race character. Her mom is black, and from photos of her late father, we see he was white. Olly is also white. Maddy’s nurse and her daughter are Latina. It’s a laudably multicultural world, with an emphasis on humanity, rather than ethnic differences. No one mentions race. This is a story about connection and love. And as a teen romance it works far better than as a tale of a young woman confined by a disease.

Also Read: Emma Stone Sends Gift to High Schooler Who Asked Her to Prom

The story has come under fire from advocacy groups for its implication that disabled people cannot lead full lives. It also treats a huge breach of trust and confidence as merely an outgrowth of parental affection, intensified by tragic loss. Maddy’s mother is a doctor and something she does would be worthy of a revoked medical license, but those matters of authenticity are brushed aside.

And then there are the issues of way-too-easy credit card fraud for ostensibly noble reasons and airplane travel for a teen with a compromised immune system and no driver’s license. It’s not just a matter of suspending disbelief: the viewer must turn off one’s sense of rational logic.

The film is at its best when it stays on more durable storytelling turf — first love. We get a palpable sense of the heady excitement, the awkwardness, the simple thrills that accompany that rush of affection and hormones.

Stenberg and Robinson play it just right, fully committed to their roles — equal parts dewy dreaminess and wry humor — mostly communicated through dual panes of glass. We believe their happy surprise when Maddy asks Olly after their first tender kiss, “Is it always like this?” and he replies simply: “It’s never like this.”

“Everything, Everything” gets several things wrong, but it’s admirable in the way it easily embraces diversity and rings true in its depiction of the first blush of love.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Alien: Covenant’ to Take Down ‘Guardians’ With Both Sets of Teeth at the Box Office

‘New Mutants:’ Anya Taylor-Joy, Maisie Williams Set to Star in ‘X-Men’ Spinoff

Dustin Lance Black Talks New Film ‘Love at First Sight’ – Which Some Call a YA ‘Before Sunrise’ (Video)

13 Summer Movie Breakout Stars, From Zendaya to Brenton Thwaites (Photos)

“Everything, Everything” is an updated, gender-reversed and more engaging version of “The Boy in the Plastic Bubble.” Hollywood loves stories of young pretty people with terminal illnesses. Think “Me and Earl and the Dying Girl,” “The Fault in Our Stars,” “Dying Young,” “Love Story,” and many more. So it’s no surprise that Nicola Yoon’s 2015 YA novel was adapted for the screen.

The lead actors are attractive and charismatic and give nuanced performances. Unfortunately, the dialogue they are given to speak is often trite and too many plot strands are unconvincing.

Amandla Stenberg (“The Hunger Games”) brings an appealing openness to the role of Maddy, a smart and imaginative 18-year-old girl with a rare autoimmune disease known as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Because almost anything could kill her, Maddy is not allowed outdoors.

She’s essentially sealed into her home, which is lavishly and tastefully decorated by her mother (Anika Noni Rose), who is also a doctor. Her mother has designed their home to bring the outdoors as close to inside as possible. If you had to live stuck inside forever, this would be the house to do it in.

We get very little sense of the 17 years that came before the movie starts. It would seem the charming, sweet and astoundingly well-adjusted Maddy never had friends, which is rather hard to believe given her warmth and the readiness of teens to connect electronically and virtually with her. It’s as if Maddy just sprung up in her late teens, allergic to all outdoors but relatively content with her life — until the appearance of the cute boy next door.

That boy is the slightly goofy, handsome and soulful Olly, affably played by Nick Robinson (“Kings of Summer”). On the day he moves in, he takes one look at Maddy and a mutual crush is born.

They gaze at each other across reflective surfaces; conveniently, her bedroom window looks directly into his room. They text. A lot. And because constant texting is inherently un-cinematic, director Stella Meghie (“Jean of the Joneses”) invents a theatrical device to bring their text conversations to vivid life: Maddy is taking an architecture class online and has constructed a rather elaborate miniature model of a diner. She imagines a more normal scenario for their banter — the two of them inside that diner, getting to know each other naturally. It is definitely more viewer-friendly, but if the movie is trying to illuminate what it feels like to live forever trapped indoors, then it serves as more of an arty distraction.

And speaking of distraction, the story undermines itself by violating its own rules. Or changing them as it goes along. Initially, the only people allowed into their home are her mother, a kindly nurse (Ana de la Reguera,”Narcos”) and the nurse’s teenage daughter (Danube Hermosillo). They — and anything else from the outside world — supposedly go through a de-contamination process before entering. Until they don’t. What “Everything, Everything” boils down to is a wobbly sense of realism that defies its own established constraints and features a twist that strains credulity.

The script, by J. Mills Goodloe (“The Age of Adaline”), is hampered by such banal lines as: “I want to experience what it’s like to be alive,” and “I’m willing to sacrifice everything just to live one perfect day.”

On the plus side, director Meghie honors the original story’s treatment of Maddy as a mixed-race character. Her mom is black, and from photos of her late father, we see he was white. Olly is also white. Maddy’s nurse and her daughter are Latina. It’s a laudably multicultural world, with an emphasis on humanity, rather than ethnic differences. No one mentions race. This is a story about connection and love. And as a teen romance it works far better than as a tale of a young woman confined by a disease.

The story has come under fire from advocacy groups for its implication that disabled people cannot lead full lives. It also treats a huge breach of trust and confidence as merely an outgrowth of parental affection, intensified by tragic loss. Maddy’s mother is a doctor and something she does would be worthy of a revoked medical license, but those matters of authenticity are brushed aside.

And then there are the issues of way-too-easy credit card fraud for ostensibly noble reasons and airplane travel for a teen with a compromised immune system and no driver’s license. It’s not just a matter of suspending disbelief: the viewer must turn off one’s sense of rational logic.

The film is at its best when it stays on more durable storytelling turf — first love. We get a palpable sense of the heady excitement, the awkwardness, the simple thrills that accompany that rush of affection and hormones.

Stenberg and Robinson play it just right, fully committed to their roles — equal parts dewy dreaminess and wry humor — mostly communicated through dual panes of glass. We believe their happy surprise when Maddy asks Olly after their first tender kiss, “Is it always like this?” and he replies simply: “It’s never like this.”

“Everything, Everything” gets several things wrong, but it’s admirable in the way it easily embraces diversity and rings true in its depiction of the first blush of love.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Alien: Covenant' to Take Down 'Guardians' With Both Sets of Teeth at the Box Office

'New Mutants:' Anya Taylor-Joy, Maisie Williams Set to Star in 'X-Men' Spinoff

Dustin Lance Black Talks New Film 'Love at First Sight' – Which Some Call a YA 'Before Sunrise' (Video)

13 Summer Movie Breakout Stars, From Zendaya to Brenton Thwaites (Photos)