Netflix Picks Up Amazon’s ‘Lost Girls’ With Amy Ryan in Lead Role

Netflix has picked up Liz Garbus’ upcoming true-story drama “Lost Girls,” individuals with knowledge of the project have confirmed to TheWrap. The film, previously held by Amazon Studios, will star Amy Ryan in the lead role .

The pickup reunites Garbus with Netflix after the streaming service distributed her documentary, “What Happened, Miss Simone?”, which explored the life and legacy of musician and African-American activist Nina Simone. The doc was nominated for an Academy Award and won an Emmy.

Also Read: ‘Arrested Development’ Season 5 Will Be Split Into 2 Parts

Based on the nonfiction book of the same name by Robert Kolker, “Lost Girls” will star Ryan as Mari Gilbert, the mother of a kidnapped girl who demands that Long Island police stay on the search for her child. As her struggle continues, Gilbert soon uncovers crimes far beyond her daughter’s abduction — a string of unsolved murders of young female sex workers on the South Shore.

Garbus will direct from a script by Michael Werwie, with Amy Nauiokas and Rory Koslow as executive producers. Anne Carey (“20th Century Women”) of Archer Gray and Kevin McCormick (The Goldfinch) of Langley Park Pictures are producing the film.

Ryan is currently filming the comedy “Late Night” with Mindy Kaling, Emma Thompson and John Lithgow; and will next be seen in the Amazon drug drama “Beautiful Boy,” which stars Steve Carell and Timothee Chalamet and will be released this October. Ryan is repped by The Gersh Agency and Bloom Hergott. Garbus is repped by ICM and Frankfurt Kurnit.

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Netflix has picked up Liz Garbus’ upcoming true-story drama “Lost Girls,” individuals with knowledge of the project have confirmed to TheWrap. The film, previously held by Amazon Studios, will star Amy Ryan in the lead role .

The pickup reunites Garbus with Netflix after the streaming service distributed her documentary, “What Happened, Miss Simone?”, which explored the life and legacy of musician and African-American activist Nina Simone. The doc was nominated for an Academy Award and won an Emmy.

Based on the nonfiction book of the same name by Robert Kolker, “Lost Girls” will star Ryan as Mari Gilbert, the mother of a kidnapped girl who demands that Long Island police stay on the search for her child. As her struggle continues, Gilbert soon uncovers crimes far beyond her daughter’s abduction — a string of unsolved murders of young female sex workers on the South Shore.

Garbus will direct from a script by Michael Werwie, with Amy Nauiokas and Rory Koslow as executive producers. Anne Carey (“20th Century Women”) of Archer Gray and Kevin McCormick (The Goldfinch) of Langley Park Pictures are producing the film.

Ryan is currently filming the comedy “Late Night” with Mindy Kaling, Emma Thompson and John Lithgow; and will next be seen in the Amazon drug drama “Beautiful Boy,” which stars Steve Carell and Timothee Chalamet and will be released this October. Ryan is repped by The Gersh Agency and Bloom Hergott. Garbus is repped by ICM and Frankfurt Kurnit.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Designated Survivor': Netflix Is in Talks to Pick Up ABC Drama After Cancellation

Netflix, ESPN Films Team on 10-Part Michael Jordan Doc 'The Last Dance' (Video)

Guillermo del Toro Horror Anthology '10 After Midnight' Gets Series Order at Netflix

Amy Ryan Joins Mindy Kaling And Emma Thompson In FilmNation-30WEST Talk Show Comedy ‘Late Night’

EXCLUSIVE: Gone Baby Gone and Birdman star Amy Ryan has joined the cast of Mindy Kaling’s comedy Late Night, I can reveal. Kaling, Emma Thompson, John Lithgow and Hugh Dancy star in the Nisha Ganatra (Cake)-directed feature which is shooting now …

EXCLUSIVE: Gone Baby Gone and Birdman star Amy Ryan has joined the cast of Mindy Kaling’s comedy Late Night, I can reveal. Kaling, Emma Thompson, John Lithgow and Hugh Dancy star in the Nisha Ganatra (Cake)-directed feature which is shooting now in New York. Kaling, star of Fox’s The Mindy Project and Warner Bros’ upcoming Ocean’s 8, wrote the script and is producing with Howard Klein, alongside Imperative Entertainment and FilmNation, who are also handling international…

‘Abundant Acreage Available’ Review: Amy Ryan Owns This Quiet Family Drama

The presence of Martin Scorsese as an executive producer no doubt drew some of the crowd to Thursday night’s Tribeca Film Festival premiere of “Abundant Acreage Available,” but the ties between Angus MacLachlan’s family drama and Scorsese’s work were not in areas (violence, Italians, “Gimme Shelter”) usually associated with the legendary director.

Instead, it was the little areas where you could see a connection: a serious examination of religious faith, a look at family dynamics and a vividly drawn sense of place — in this case not Little Italy, but a modest family farm somewhere in North Carolina.

And the audience didn’t leave “Abundant Acreage Available” thinking about Scorsese — because this movie belongs to actress Amy Ryan, who gives a haunting, quietly commanding performance as a fortysomething woman who lives with her brother (Terry Kinney) on a small tobacco farm.

Also Read: Tribeca Opens With Aretha Franklin, Barry Manilow Celebrating Clive Davis

Ryan and Kinney’s characters have only recently buried their father, who died after a long illness, when three brothers (Max Gail, Francis Guinan and Steve Coulter) show up and pitch a tent on their property. The men furnish a suspicious story about car trouble and show no great hurry to move on.

“Abundant Acreage Available,” a movie looking for a distribution deal at Tribeca, is all about quiet, stillness, grief and faith. And the movie itself is quiet and still, set in the dead of winter when little seems to be growing and we rarely even see the birds that fly overhead. For long stretches, there is no score, just the sound of wind; when music creeps in, it does so softly and then goes away again.

Voices are raised and there’s even some violence, but it’s understated; the three mysterious brothers are a soft, enigmatic threat, not an overt one.

The performances are strong: Kinney as a man looking desperately to religion as a way to forgive himself for a tragedy; Gail as a curious spokesperson for the trio of squatters; and especially Coulter as the quietest of the brothers, whose rectitude has those around him deciding that they know what’s best for him (and for Ryan’s character).

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His scenes with Ryan are among the film’s richest and most satisfying, but the actress holds the screen no matter what she’s doing and who she’s with. There is no vanity in her portrayal of a woman who looks beaten down but has chosen the life she’s leading, and who is roused to protect her lifestyle when it suddenly seems threatened for reasons that make little sense to her.

MacLachlan is best known for his script to the 2005 drama “Junebug,” which brought another Amy — in that case, Adams — her first Oscar nomination. He knows how to sketch small-town lives keenly and sensitively, even if his tone of somber ambiguity does not always lead to wholly satisfying drama.

But for an audience willing to be patient and drift along with the quiet drama — which is to say, most of the audience at Tribeca’s Cinepolis Chelsea on Thursday night — “Abundant Acreage Available” is a slow ride worth taking.

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The presence of Martin Scorsese as an executive producer no doubt drew some of the crowd to Thursday night’s Tribeca Film Festival premiere of “Abundant Acreage Available,” but the ties between Angus MacLachlan’s family drama and Scorsese’s work were not in areas (violence, Italians, “Gimme Shelter”) usually associated with the legendary director.

Instead, it was the little areas where you could see a connection: a serious examination of religious faith, a look at family dynamics and a vividly drawn sense of place — in this case not Little Italy, but a modest family farm somewhere in North Carolina.

And the audience didn’t leave “Abundant Acreage Available” thinking about Scorsese — because this movie belongs to actress Amy Ryan, who gives a haunting, quietly commanding performance as a fortysomething woman who lives with her brother (Terry Kinney) on a small tobacco farm.

Ryan and Kinney’s characters have only recently buried their father, who died after a long illness, when three brothers (Max Gail, Francis Guinan and Steve Coulter) show up and pitch a tent on their property. The men furnish a suspicious story about car trouble and show no great hurry to move on.

“Abundant Acreage Available,” a movie looking for a distribution deal at Tribeca, is all about quiet, stillness, grief and faith. And the movie itself is quiet and still, set in the dead of winter when little seems to be growing and we rarely even see the birds that fly overhead. For long stretches, there is no score, just the sound of wind; when music creeps in, it does so softly and then goes away again.

Voices are raised and there’s even some violence, but it’s understated; the three mysterious brothers are a soft, enigmatic threat, not an overt one.

The performances are strong: Kinney as a man looking desperately to religion as a way to forgive himself for a tragedy; Gail as a curious spokesperson for the trio of squatters; and especially Coulter as the quietest of the brothers, whose rectitude has those around him deciding that they know what’s best for him (and for Ryan’s character).

His scenes with Ryan are among the film’s richest and most satisfying, but the actress holds the screen no matter what she’s doing and who she’s with. There is no vanity in her portrayal of a woman who looks beaten down but has chosen the life she’s leading, and who is roused to protect her lifestyle when it suddenly seems threatened for reasons that make little sense to her.

MacLachlan is best known for his script to the 2005 drama “Junebug,” which brought another Amy — in that case, Adams — her first Oscar nomination. He knows how to sketch small-town lives keenly and sensitively, even if his tone of somber ambiguity does not always lead to wholly satisfying drama.

But for an audience willing to be patient and drift along with the quiet drama — which is to say, most of the audience at Tribeca’s Cinepolis Chelsea on Thursday night — “Abundant Acreage Available” is a slow ride worth taking.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Tribeca Film Festival to Present Springsteen, Kobe, TV … and Oh Yeah, Movies

Bruce Springsteen, Barbra Streisand, Kobe Bryant to Join Tribeca Film Festival Talks

'Flower' Review: Zoey Deutch Stars in a Toxic 'Juno' Knock-Off

Amy Ryan on Playing Difficult Women: ‘I’ve Become Their Advocate’

She plays a fiercely independent woman in “Abundant Acreage Available,” and it’s not the first time. This is what drives her distinctive filmography.

In “Abundant Acreage Available,” Amy Ryan plays a tough-minded woman who reunites with her brother (Terry Kinney) to bury their father on the farm where he raised them. As they argue about where to lay him to rest, another set of siblings from their father’s past show up to further complicate matters, laying claim to the land and injecting themselves into the center of this parochial setting.

Ryan’s character remains a fierce, defiant voice who pushes back against her brother’s religious convictions and the interlopers who question her solitary way of life. It’s a commanding performance that dominates this quiet, understated movie, and it makes you wonder why Ryan — an Oscar nominee for “Gone Baby Gone” — doesn’t land such impressive leading roles more often.

Ryan, however, doesn’t spend much time on that question. “I can’t say that I kick and scream when I’m on a Spielberg movie that I’m not the lead,” she said in a phone interview, referencing her bit part in 2015’s “Bridge of Spies,” one of the many studio projects in which she’s surfaced on the sidelines. “I totally understand why Tom Hanks got that part. That’s OK by me. Honestly, I’d rather have two scenes in an incredibly well-written film than a lead in a poorly written film.”

Ryan is a shape-shifter who juggles many modes, but she often gravitates toward less-than-glamorous roles even when she’s in the spotlight. Last year, she landed raves for her turn in Broadway’s “Love, Love, Love,” where she played one half of a narcissistic British couple over the course of a marriage that lasts decades. In “Gone Baby Gone,” she was a vulgar, drug-addicted mother, shortly before she surfaced on NBC’s “The Office” as the klutzy romantic interest of Steve Carell’s bumbling manager.

“I’m certainly not afraid of parts that might not be likable, or might be hard to look at,” she said. “That doesn’t scare me. Maybe that’s why I’ve become their advocate.”

“Abundant Acreage Available” intrigued her because it didn’t heap pity on her character simply because she was a single 40-something woman. “I just liked her strength and was curious about being in this world with this woman who’s so strong, capable of taking care of anything,” she said. “There’s no traumatic backstory for why she never married a man. She’s just been busy.” She was also keen on a part that pushed beyond her liberal bubble.

“It’s kind of radical to have a lead character who’s a Christian conservative,” she said, noting the film’s red-state backdrop. Ryan acknowledged that it wasn’t an easy sell — Gravitas Ventures is releasing the movie in a handful of theaters in New York and Los Angeles, but it’s largely a VOD play. “Maybe people who love independent film will see this, maybe they won’t,” she said, “but to step into this world of these other characters who we don’t usually get to see, and they’re shown without judgement, they’re just trying to get through life as we all are, that’s what’s so wonderful about the film.”

The movie was directed by “Junebug” screenwriter Angus Maclachlan on a tight 18-day shoot in rural North Carolina. It wasn’t a big paycheck for the actress, but she finds those gigs elsewhere. Last year, she showed up in “Monster Trucks” and the Dwayne Johnson vehicle “Central Intelligence,” where she played a cartoonishly stern CIA agent. “The big-budget films pay for the independent films,” Ryan said. “I’ve been lucky to find a happy balance.”

“Central Intelligence”

On “Central Intelligence,” she added, “I was just shocked they cast me. You know, usually, these CIA characters are 25 and smoking hot. I’m in my 40s!” When she brought that up with director Rawson Marshall Thurber, “he said, ‘I need someone who can handle all the long dialogue,’” she recalled. “That was flattering, but with bigger-budget films, the characters are more stereotyped. They’re liked placeholders. You are the wife, the mother, the mean boss. I don’t even know if the formula has time for nuance.”

She recently united with Carell under much different circumstances from their “Office” romance, as an estranged couple in “Beautiful Boy” whose marriage collapses when their offspring suffers from a drug problem. The movie, the English-language debut of “Broken Circle Breakdown” director Felix van Groeningen, finds the actors on the phone for much of the movie — but one key scene had them face to face, and it presented a fresh challenge. “We had to work against our natural chemistry, because these are people who aren’t quite in love anymore,” she said. “We had to be terse with each other, which is not something we’re used to doing together.”

But Ryan has relished the opportunity to diversify her parts over the years, developing that agenda in tandem with Jason Gutman at the Gersh Agency. “We’re very much on the same page,” she said. “He’ll read something someone wants me to do and say, ‘I can send this to you, but I know it’s not for you,’ and he’s always been right. We don’t just do money projects because they’re money projects. There has to be some other reason. I can’t repeat myself.”

She echoed a desire for more strong female characters beyond the studio archetypes. “I used to say to a friend, ‘Why don’t you write a movie with a male lead, and when you’re done, go back and change the lead to a woman?’” she said. “Just stop thinking about it and just let it be the female part. Certainly, there have been great strides for female stories or stories that have females in the lead. But so much more needs to be done, and that viewpoint needs to broaden greatly, so that women aren’t just the sounding board for men. It’s not that simple in real life.”

“Abundant Acreage Available” is now playing in New York and available on VOD platforms.

Jordan Klepper’s ‘Nightly Show’ Replacement Finally Gets a Name – and a Premiere Date

Comedy Central made a series of mid-level announcements Tuesday morning from the Beverly Hilton ballroom, where the Viacom cable network participated in Day 1 of the Television Critics Association (TCA) Summer Press Tour.

For starters, “The President Show” and “The Jim Jeffries Show” are each getting additional episodes, which was pretty much always the plan. Additionally, Jordan Klepper’s late-night show — which will finally replace Larry Wilmore’s “The Nightly Show” — and Season 4 of Broad City both got premiere dates. They also each unveiled some new details, like the Klepper-series’ title, “The Opposition.”

Plus, “The Daily Show” informed TV critics and reporters that it was heading to Chicago for a week in October. And finally, Comedy Central president Kent Alterman said that comedy quartet Goatface is getting a one-hour special on his network.

Also Read: ‘Atlanta,’ ‘This Is Us’ and ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Lead TCA Awards Nominations

Let’s tackle these in order: “The President Show” gets a back-7 order; Jim Jeffries lands 10 more episodes.

Klepper’s  show is set to start Sept. 25 at 11:30 p.m. “The Opposition with Jordan Klepper” will satirize the hyperbolic, conspiracy-laden noise machine that is the alternative-media landscape on both the right and left, per Comedy Central. “The Opposition” is the voice of the new America. It is the America that defines its own reality. It’s the America of paid protestors, Obama’s birth certificate, and the certainty that CNN is fake news.

As for “Broad City,” its fourth run kicks off Wednesday, Sept. 13 at 10:30 p.m. As previously announced, this season will see Hannibal Buress, Arturo Castro, Paul W. Downs and John Gemberling recurring. It also boasts the following lineup of guests, most of which were known prior to Tuesday: RuPaul Charles, Shania Twain, Steve Buscemi, Sandra Bernhard, Mike Birbiglia, Jane Curtin, Susie Essman, Peri Gilpin, Alysia Reiner, Amy Ryan, Constance Shulman and Wanda Sykes.

Also Read: Chris Hardwick’s ‘@midnight’ Canceled on Comedy Central After 4 Seasons

“The Daily Show Undesked Chicago 2017: Let’s Do This Before It Gets Too Damn Cold” will telecast from the Athenaeum Theatre from Monday, Oct. 16 through Thursday, Oct. 19.

Goatface consists of “The Daily Show’s” Hasan Minhaj, as well as Asif Ali, Fahim Anwar and Aristotle Athiras. The special has no air-date yet.

Readers of TheWrap can expect lots of announcements like these over the next few weeks: TCA runs today through Aug. 9.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Comedy Central Sets ‘Fake News With Ted Nelms’ Special Starring Ed Helms

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Comedy Central Finally Replaces ‘The Nightly Show’ With Jordan Klepper Series

Comedy Central made a series of mid-level announcements Tuesday morning from the Beverly Hilton ballroom, where the Viacom cable network participated in Day 1 of the Television Critics Association (TCA) Summer Press Tour.

For starters, “The President Show” and “The Jim Jeffries Show” are each getting additional episodes, which was pretty much always the plan. Additionally, Jordan Klepper’s late-night show — which will finally replace Larry Wilmore’s “The Nightly Show” — and Season 4 of Broad City both got premiere dates. They also each unveiled some new details, like the Klepper-series’ title, “The Opposition.”

Plus, “The Daily Show” informed TV critics and reporters that it was heading to Chicago for a week in October. And finally, Comedy Central president Kent Alterman said that comedy quartet Goatface is getting a one-hour special on his network.

Let’s tackle these in order: “The President Show” gets a back-7 order; Jim Jeffries lands 10 more episodes.

Klepper’s  show is set to start Sept. 25 at 11:30 p.m. “The Opposition with Jordan Klepper” will satirize the hyperbolic, conspiracy-laden noise machine that is the alternative-media landscape on both the right and left, per Comedy Central. “The Opposition” is the voice of the new America. It is the America that defines its own reality. It’s the America of paid protestors, Obama’s birth certificate, and the certainty that CNN is fake news.

As for “Broad City,” its fourth run kicks off Wednesday, Sept. 13 at 10:30 p.m. As previously announced, this season will see Hannibal Buress, Arturo Castro, Paul W. Downs and John Gemberling recurring. It also boasts the following lineup of guests, most of which were known prior to Tuesday: RuPaul Charles, Shania Twain, Steve Buscemi, Sandra Bernhard, Mike Birbiglia, Jane Curtin, Susie Essman, Peri Gilpin, Alysia Reiner, Amy Ryan, Constance Shulman and Wanda Sykes.

“The Daily Show Undesked Chicago 2017: Let’s Do This Before It Gets Too Damn Cold” will telecast from the Athenaeum Theatre from Monday, Oct. 16 through Thursday, Oct. 19.

Goatface consists of “The Daily Show’s” Hasan Minhaj, as well as Asif Ali, Fahim Anwar and Aristotle Athiras. The special has no air-date yet.

Readers of TheWrap can expect lots of announcements like these over the next few weeks: TCA runs today through Aug. 9.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Comedy Central Sets 'Fake News With Ted Nelms' Special Starring Ed Helms

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‘La La Land’s’ Fred Berger to Produce Noir Thriller ‘Strange but True’ (EXCLUSIVE)

“La La Land” producer Fred Berger has set multilayered noir thriller “Strange but True” as his next project. British sales company Bankside Films is handling international sales on the film, which it will introduce to buyers at the Cannes Film Festival this week. Academy Award nominees Amy Ryan and Greg Kinnear will lead the cast,… Read more »

“La La Land” producer Fred Berger has set multilayered noir thriller “Strange but True” as his next project. British sales company Bankside Films is handling international sales on the film, which it will introduce to buyers at the Cannes Film Festival this week. Academy Award nominees Amy Ryan and Greg Kinnear will lead the cast,... Read more »

Tribeca Film Review: ‘Abundant Acreage Available’

If you liked “Manchester by the Sea” — or the kind of low-key emotional drama in which men break down and sob uncontrollably — then Martin Scorsese has the movie for you. It’s called “Abundant Acreage Available,” and it’s pretty much the opposite of anything Scorsese has directed, which stands to reason, because he didn’t direct… Read more »

If you liked “Manchester by the Sea” — or the kind of low-key emotional drama in which men break down and sob uncontrollably — then Martin Scorsese has the movie for you. It’s called “Abundant Acreage Available,” and it’s pretty much the opposite of anything Scorsese has directed, which stands to reason, because he didn’t direct... Read more »