Sundance Party Report: Zac Efron, Awkwafina, Jason Momoa and More on the Scene (Photos)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Big stars – and lots of those not-so-famous actors hoping to ride the Sundance Film Festival train to that same spot in the Hollywood firmament – descended on Park City for Sundance 2019 as the fest’s first weekend unfolded from Janua…

Timothee Chalamet to Receive Spotlight Actor Award at Palm Springs Film Festival

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Timothée Chalamet will receive the Spotlight Award, Actor at the 30th annual Palm Springs International Film Festival in January, the festival announced Wednesday.

The actor will receive the award at the Film Awards Gala for his role in “Beautiful Boy.” The event will be held on Jan. 3 and will be hosted by Mary Hart and Entertainment Tonight.

“Timothée Chalamet gives a heartwarming, but tragic performance as a young man struggling with drug addiction in the film ‘Beautiful Boy,’” Festival chairman Harold Matzner said. “Last year Timothée was the recipient of the Festival’s Rising Star Award for his role in ‘Call Me by Your Name.’  He is definitely a rising star.  It is our honor to present the Spotlight Award, Actor to Timothée Chalamet.”

Also Read: ‘Beautiful Boy’ Film Review: Timothée Chalamet and Steve Carell Shine in Harrowing Look at Addiction

Previously announced honorees include Glenn Close, Olivia Colman, Bradley Cooper, Alfonso Cuaron, Regina King, Spike Lee, Rami Malek, Melissa McCarthy and “Green Book.”

Past recipients of the Spotlight Award, Actor have included Bryan Cranston, Andrew Garfield, J.K. Simmons and Sam Rockwell, and all recipients received Academy Award nominations the year they were honored with the Spotlight Award.

“Beautiful Boy” also stars Steve Carell, Maura Tierney and Amy Ryan. The film is based on two memoirs and follows a family’s love in the midst of their son’s addiction and his attempts at recovery. Felix van Groeningen directed.

Also Read: Timothée Chalamet in Talks to Star in Denis Villeneuve’s ‘Dune’ Remake

So far, Chalamet has also received a Golden Globe nomination for his role in “Beautiful Boy,” as well as a SAG Award nomination and a Critics Choice Award nomination. Previously, he was nominated for an Academy Award for his role in Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me By Your Name.”

His other credits include “Lady Bird,” “Hot Summer Nights,” “Interstellar,” “A Rainy Day in New York” and “Hostiles.” He is currently filming David Michod’s “The King.”

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‘Lost Girls’: Gabriel Byrne, Lola Kirke, Miriam Shor & More Round Out Cast Of Netflix Crime Feature

Read on: Deadline.

Gabriel Byrne, most recently seen in the acclaimed Hereditary, has joined the Netflix true crime film Lost Girls, along with Lola Kirke (Mozart in the Jungle), Miriam Shor (Younger), Thomasin McKenzie (Leave No Trace), Oona Laurence (The Beguiled), Ree…

‘Beautiful Boy’ Team Hopes “To Take Out The Shame Of What It Is To Be Addicted” – Toronto Studio

Read on: Deadline.

Premiering today at TIFF before hitting theaters October 12, Amazon Studio’s Beautiful Boy details the real-life experience of a fragmented father-son relationship. Based on the bestselling memoirs by father-son David and Nic Sheff, the account d…

Timothée Chalamet Battles Addiction in ‘Beautiful Boy’ Trailer (Video)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Call Me by Your Name” breakout Timothée Chalamet could be gunning for his second straight Oscar nomination, playing a drug-addicted teenager in “Beautiful Boy.”

The new drama, directed by Felix Van Groeningen (“The Broken Circle Breakdown”), debuted a heart-tugging first trailer that suggested major emotional scenes with Chalamet — as well as Steve Carell as his dad.

The film chronicles the heartbreaking and inspiring experience of survival, relapse, and recovery in a family coping with addiction over many years.

Also Read: Timothée Chalamet Returns to the ’80s in ‘Hot Summer Nights’ Trailer (Video)

The Amazon release, based on father-son memoirs by David Sheff (“Beautiful Boy”) and Nic Sheff (“Tweak”), also stars Maura Tierney and Amy Ryan.

Chalamet became an indie heartthrob as a young gay teenager during an idyllic summer in 1983 Italy in Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me by Your Name,” which earned an Oscar for James Ivory’s adapted screenplay and three other nominations, including Best Picture.

Chalamet also stars in next month’s indie “Hot Summer Nights,” playing a shy weed dealer in 1980s Cape Cod.

“Beautiful Boy” is due in theaters October 12.

Watch the trailer above.

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Netflix Picks Up Amazon’s ‘Lost Girls’ With Amy Ryan in Lead Role

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Netflix has picked up Liz Garbus’ upcoming true-story drama “Lost Girls,” individuals with knowledge of the project have confirmed to TheWrap. The film, previously held by Amazon Studios, will star Amy Ryan in the lead role .

The pickup reunites Garbus with Netflix after the streaming service distributed her documentary, “What Happened, Miss Simone?”, which explored the life and legacy of musician and African-American activist Nina Simone. The doc was nominated for an Academy Award and won an Emmy.

Also Read: ‘Arrested Development’ Season 5 Will Be Split Into 2 Parts

Based on the nonfiction book of the same name by Robert Kolker, “Lost Girls” will star Ryan as Mari Gilbert, the mother of a kidnapped girl who demands that Long Island police stay on the search for her child. As her struggle continues, Gilbert soon uncovers crimes far beyond her daughter’s abduction — a string of unsolved murders of young female sex workers on the South Shore.

Garbus will direct from a script by Michael Werwie, with Amy Nauiokas and Rory Koslow as executive producers. Anne Carey (“20th Century Women”) of Archer Gray and Kevin McCormick (The Goldfinch) of Langley Park Pictures are producing the film.

Ryan is currently filming the comedy “Late Night” with Mindy Kaling, Emma Thompson and John Lithgow; and will next be seen in the Amazon drug drama “Beautiful Boy,” which stars Steve Carell and Timothee Chalamet and will be released this October. Ryan is repped by The Gersh Agency and Bloom Hergott. Garbus is repped by ICM and Frankfurt Kurnit.

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Amy Ryan Joins Mindy Kaling And Emma Thompson In FilmNation-30WEST Talk Show Comedy ‘Late Night’

Read on: Deadline.

EXCLUSIVE: Gone Baby Gone and Birdman star Amy Ryan has joined the cast of Mindy Kaling’s comedy Late Night, I can reveal. Kaling, Emma Thompson, John Lithgow and Hugh Dancy star in the Nisha Ganatra (Cake)-directed feature which is shooting now …

‘Abundant Acreage Available’ Review: Amy Ryan Owns This Quiet Family Drama

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The presence of Martin Scorsese as an executive producer no doubt drew some of the crowd to Thursday night’s Tribeca Film Festival premiere of “Abundant Acreage Available,” but the ties between Angus MacLachlan’s family drama and Scorsese’s work were not in areas (violence, Italians, “Gimme Shelter”) usually associated with the legendary director.

Instead, it was the little areas where you could see a connection: a serious examination of religious faith, a look at family dynamics and a vividly drawn sense of place — in this case not Little Italy, but a modest family farm somewhere in North Carolina.

And the audience didn’t leave “Abundant Acreage Available” thinking about Scorsese — because this movie belongs to actress Amy Ryan, who gives a haunting, quietly commanding performance as a fortysomething woman who lives with her brother (Terry Kinney) on a small tobacco farm.

Also Read: Tribeca Opens With Aretha Franklin, Barry Manilow Celebrating Clive Davis

Ryan and Kinney’s characters have only recently buried their father, who died after a long illness, when three brothers (Max Gail, Francis Guinan and Steve Coulter) show up and pitch a tent on their property. The men furnish a suspicious story about car trouble and show no great hurry to move on.

“Abundant Acreage Available,” a movie looking for a distribution deal at Tribeca, is all about quiet, stillness, grief and faith. And the movie itself is quiet and still, set in the dead of winter when little seems to be growing and we rarely even see the birds that fly overhead. For long stretches, there is no score, just the sound of wind; when music creeps in, it does so softly and then goes away again.

Voices are raised and there’s even some violence, but it’s understated; the three mysterious brothers are a soft, enigmatic threat, not an overt one.

The performances are strong: Kinney as a man looking desperately to religion as a way to forgive himself for a tragedy; Gail as a curious spokesperson for the trio of squatters; and especially Coulter as the quietest of the brothers, whose rectitude has those around him deciding that they know what’s best for him (and for Ryan’s character).

Also Read: ‘Free Fire’ Review: Ben Wheatley Sends Losers, Guns and Money

His scenes with Ryan are among the film’s richest and most satisfying, but the actress holds the screen no matter what she’s doing and who she’s with. There is no vanity in her portrayal of a woman who looks beaten down but has chosen the life she’s leading, and who is roused to protect her lifestyle when it suddenly seems threatened for reasons that make little sense to her.

MacLachlan is best known for his script to the 2005 drama “Junebug,” which brought another Amy — in that case, Adams — her first Oscar nomination. He knows how to sketch small-town lives keenly and sensitively, even if his tone of somber ambiguity does not always lead to wholly satisfying drama.

But for an audience willing to be patient and drift along with the quiet drama — which is to say, most of the audience at Tribeca’s Cinepolis Chelsea on Thursday night — “Abundant Acreage Available” is a slow ride worth taking.

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Jordan Klepper’s ‘Nightly Show’ Replacement Finally Gets a Name – and a Premiere Date

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Comedy Central made a series of mid-level announcements Tuesday morning from the Beverly Hilton ballroom, where the Viacom cable network participated in Day 1 of the Television Critics Association (TCA) Summer Press Tour.

For starters, “The President Show” and “The Jim Jeffries Show” are each getting additional episodes, which was pretty much always the plan. Additionally, Jordan Klepper’s late-night show — which will finally replace Larry Wilmore’s “The Nightly Show” — and Season 4 of Broad City both got premiere dates. They also each unveiled some new details, like the Klepper-series’ title, “The Opposition.”

Plus, “The Daily Show” informed TV critics and reporters that it was heading to Chicago for a week in October. And finally, Comedy Central president Kent Alterman said that comedy quartet Goatface is getting a one-hour special on his network.

Also Read: ‘Atlanta,’ ‘This Is Us’ and ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Lead TCA Awards Nominations

Let’s tackle these in order: “The President Show” gets a back-7 order; Jim Jeffries lands 10 more episodes.

Klepper’s  show is set to start Sept. 25 at 11:30 p.m. “The Opposition with Jordan Klepper” will satirize the hyperbolic, conspiracy-laden noise machine that is the alternative-media landscape on both the right and left, per Comedy Central. “The Opposition” is the voice of the new America. It is the America that defines its own reality. It’s the America of paid protestors, Obama’s birth certificate, and the certainty that CNN is fake news.

As for “Broad City,” its fourth run kicks off Wednesday, Sept. 13 at 10:30 p.m. As previously announced, this season will see Hannibal Buress, Arturo Castro, Paul W. Downs and John Gemberling recurring. It also boasts the following lineup of guests, most of which were known prior to Tuesday: RuPaul Charles, Shania Twain, Steve Buscemi, Sandra Bernhard, Mike Birbiglia, Jane Curtin, Susie Essman, Peri Gilpin, Alysia Reiner, Amy Ryan, Constance Shulman and Wanda Sykes.

Also Read: Chris Hardwick’s ‘@midnight’ Canceled on Comedy Central After 4 Seasons

“The Daily Show Undesked Chicago 2017: Let’s Do This Before It Gets Too Damn Cold” will telecast from the Athenaeum Theatre from Monday, Oct. 16 through Thursday, Oct. 19.

Goatface consists of “The Daily Show’s” Hasan Minhaj, as well as Asif Ali, Fahim Anwar and Aristotle Athiras. The special has no air-date yet.

Readers of TheWrap can expect lots of announcements like these over the next few weeks: TCA runs today through Aug. 9.

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‘La La Land’s’ Fred Berger to Produce Noir Thriller ‘Strange but True’ (EXCLUSIVE)

Read on: Variety.

“La La Land” producer Fred Berger has set multilayered noir thriller “Strange but True” as his next project. British sales company Bankside Films is handling international sales on the film, which it will introduce to buyers at the Cannes Film Festival this week. Academy Award nominees Amy Ryan and Greg Kinnear will lead the cast,… Read more »

Tribeca Film Review: ‘Abundant Acreage Available’

Read on: Variety.

If you liked “Manchester by the Sea” — or the kind of low-key emotional drama in which men break down and sob uncontrollably — then Martin Scorsese has the movie for you. It’s called “Abundant Acreage Available,” and it’s pretty much the opposite of anything Scorsese has directed, which stands to reason, because he didn’t direct… Read more »

‘Abundant Acreage Available’ Tribeca Review: Amy Ryan Owns This Quiet Family Drama

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The presence of Martin Scorsese as an executive producer no doubt drew some of the crowd to Thursday night’s Tribeca Film Festival premiere of “Abundant Acreage Available,” but the ties between Angus MacLachlan’s family drama and Scorsese’s work were not in areas (violence, Italians, “Gimme Shelter”) usually associated with the legendary director.

Instead, it was the little areas where you could see a connection: a serious examination of religious faith, a look at family dynamics and a vividly drawn sense of place — in this case not Little Italy, but a modest family farm somewhere in North Carolina.

And the audience didn’t leave “Abundant Acreage Available” thinking about Scorsese — because this movie belongs to actress Amy Ryan, who gives a haunting, quietly commanding performance as a fortysomething woman who lives with her brother (Terry Kinney) on a small tobacco farm.

Also Read: Tribeca Opens With Aretha Franklin, Barry Manilow Celebrating Clive Davis

Ryan and Kinney’s characters have only recently buried their father, who died after a long illness, when three brothers (Max Gail, Francis Guinan and Steve Coulter) show up and pitch a tent on their property. The men furnish a suspicious story about car trouble and show no great hurry to move on.

“Abundant Acreage Available,” a movie looking for a distribution deal at Tribeca, is all about quiet, stillness, grief and faith. And the movie itself is quiet and still, set in the dead of winter when little seems to be growing and we rarely even see the birds that fly overhead. For long stretches, there is no score, just the sound of wind; when music creeps in, it does so softly and then goes away again.

Voices are raised and there’s even some violence, but it’s understated; the three mysterious brothers are a soft, enigmatic threat, not an overt one.

The performances are strong: Kinney as a man looking desperately to religion as a way to forgive himself for a tragedy; Gail as a curious spokesperson for the trio of squatters; and especially Coulter as the quietest of the brothers, whose rectitude has those around him deciding that they know what’s best for him (and for Ryan’s character).

Also Read: ‘Free Fire’ Review: Ben Wheatley Sends Losers, Guns and Money

His scenes with Ryan are among the film’s richest and most satisfying, but the actress holds the screen no matter what she’s doing and who she’s with. There is no vanity in her portrayal of a woman who looks beaten down but has chosen the life she’s leading, and who is roused to protect her lifestyle when it suddenly seems threatened for reasons that make little sense to her.

MacLachlan is best known for his script to the 2005 drama “Junebug,” which brought another Amy — in that case, Adams — her first Oscar nomination. He knows how to sketch small-town lives keenly and sensitively, even if his tone of somber ambiguity does not always lead to wholly satisfying drama.

But for an audience willing to be patient and drift along with the quiet drama — which is to say, most of the audience at Tribeca’s Cinepolis Chelsea on Thursday night — “Abundant Acreage Available” is a slow ride worth taking.

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‘Abundant Acreage Available’: Film Review | Tribeca 2017

Read on: Hollywood Reporter - All Reviews.

Amy Ryan and Terry Kinney play siblings grieving their father when strangers arrive on their farm in Angus MacLachlan’s drama ‘Abundant Acreage Available,’ executive produced by Martin Scorsese.read more

Off Broadway Review: ‘Love, Love, Love’ With Amy Ryan, Zoe Kazan

Read on: Variety.

Mike Bartlett’s play “Love, Love, Love,” now playing at the Roundabout Theater Company, takes an amused (and slightly horrified) look at the boomer generation as it arrogantly positions itself at the center of the universe from the 1960s to the present day.  A cross between Joe Orton and Kenneth Lonergan, this snappy satire follows the adventures… Read more »

‘Love, Love, Love’ Theater Review: Richard Armitage, Amy Ryan Bond With the Beatles

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Give or take a couple of years, Richard Armitage goes from 20 to 40 to 60 in the course of Mike Bartlett’s new three-act comedy, “Love, Love, Love,” which opened Wednesday at Roundabout’s Off Broadway Laura Pels Theatre. It’s hard to say what’s more astounding — that Armitage (he plays Thorin Oakenshield in “The Hobbit” trilogy) is utterly convincing at each age in each act, or that someone has written a three-act play in an era of 80-minute divertissements?

Before you panic at having to endure some Eugene O’Neill marathon, “Love, Love, Love” comes in at just over two hours and it’s very funny. While there are two intermissions, they’re needed to establish three very different British interiors, each of which set designer Derek McLane renders in careful detail.

Armitage makes his New York stage debut, and he’s spectacular. His callow-but-always-charming Kenneth meets his future wife, Sandra (Amy Ryan), shortly after the Beatles have released their 1967 single “Love, Love, Love,” and they fall in love (more likely it’s lust) dancing to the tune in the apartment of his older brother, Henry (Alex Hurt), who’s dating Sandra at the time. Needless to say, we never see Henry again until act three, and then in a very different form.

Also Read: ‘The Cherry Orchard’ Broadway Review: Diane Lane Stars in an Overripe Revival

“Love, Love, Love” tracks Kenneth and Sandra’s relationship with each other, as well as their two children (Zoe Kazan and an effectively unhinged Ben Rosenfield). It’s not inappropriate to compare Bartlett’s play with last season’s breakthrough “The Humans,” which also opened under the auspices of the Roundabout at the Pels Theatre.

Michael Mayer‘s direction is much bouncier than Joe Mantello’s staging of the Stephen Karam play. Ryan brings a real “Ab Fab” flair to Sandra. She’s not quite as successful as Armitage in playing the younger version of her character, but then he’s not required to answer to “bird” and wear a Mary Quant mini-dress knockoff (costumes by Susan Hilferty).

Mayer’s manic brand is much less effective with the introduction of Kazan’s teenage Rose in the second act. From the beginning, she should be the eye in this family storm, but her tragedy is played for broad laughs. When we meet her again at age 37 in act three, her situation doesn’t deliver the necessary resonance.

Also Read: ‘Heisenberg’ Broadway Review: Mary-Louise Parker Stuck in Pretentious Physics-Inspired Play

Bartlett is writing about Britain, not America, but his thesis that the aging flower children squandered everything and left nothing for their kids misses a generation. Those who came of age in the late 1960s inherited their parents’ wealth and then spent it.

While the Kazan character bemoans her parents’ generation (she delivers the play’s funniest line), it’s intriguing to compare Rose to the lead character in David Hare’s “Plenty,” now starring Rachel Weisz at the Public Theater. Susan Traherne, the age of what would be Rose’s grandparents, feels cheated by post-World War II Britain. In the end, every generation has something to bitch about.

Considering what happens to Kenneth and Sandra’s children in act three, “Love, Love, Love” is nearly as grim as Hare’s take on life (and maybe darker than even Karam’s). Mayer and Bartlett, to their credit, keep Kenneth and Sandra completely oblivious to that fact.

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Mike Bartlett’s ‘Love, Love, Love’ Sizzles With Amy Ryan, Zoe Kazan – Review

Read on: Deadline.

Before the prodigiously gifted British writer Mike Bartlett wrote last year’s Broadway knockout King Charles III and the BBC’s Doctor Foster, he was what might be called a New Angry Young Man in the tradition of fellow countryman Stephen Poliakoff (Gideon’s Daughter) and our own Michael Weller (Spoils Of War, Moonchildren), casting a jaundiced eye on the Woodstock generation and its discontented spawn. That includes Bartlett’s excoriating Love, Love Love, written six…