9 ‘Mean Girls’ Secrets Revealed, From Amy Poehler’s Fake Boobs to Lindsay Lohan’s Feud

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Over a decade after their movie debuted in theaters and became an instant comedy classic, the cast of “Mean Girls” was reunited once again in 2014 for an Entertainment Weekly photo shoot.

The stars of the film, Lindsay Lohan, Tina Fey, Rachel McAdams, Amanda Seyfried and Lacey Chabert, were dressed like true Plastics in heels and high-end threads for the reunion.

The women then sat down to share stories about what went down on the set, including never-before-revealed details about the movie.

See photos: The Evolution of Zac Efron: From Squeaky Clean ‘High School’ Star to Raunchy Frat King

Fans of the 2004 film will be crushed to know just how close they came to seeing a “Mean Girls” sequel or who Fey had in mind originally to play Cady Heron.

TheWrap has assembled nine revelations the ladies divulged during their interviews below.

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1. Tina Fey now regrets not doing a “Mean Girls” sequel
“At the time we did want to start the conversation about the sequel, and for whatever reason I was like, ‘No!!! We shouldn’t do that!’” Fey said. “Now I look back and I’m like, ‘Why?’ But now, no — it’s too late.”

See video: Tina Fey Knows How to Remain Anonymous in Her Nude Celebrity Photos

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2. Lindsay Lohan wanted to be Regina George, Rachel McAdams auditioned for Cady and Amanda Seyfried was just happy to get cast
Lohan admitted that she went to war with director Mark Waters over giving her the part of Plastic Queen Regina, saying: “I was still 17 years old and I wanted to be the cool girl on set.” The part eventually went to McAdams, even though she had auditioned to play Cady Heron. When Seyfried got the part of Karen Smith, she was just relieved to have any role in the film.

“I just wanted to be in the movie. To be asked to play Karen, I was like, ‘Great! Whatever!’” Seyfried says.

Also read: How Our Dumb Celebrity Media Covered Lindsay Lohan’s Miscarriage ‘Confession’

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3. Tina Fey had to be convinced that Lindsay Lohan was right for the part of Cady
“At some point I was like, “Oh, should Lindsay be Regina?” Fey said. “And then Mark and Lorne [Michaels] had the good sense to say, ‘No, she gets to turn into Regina.’ You work backward from that and you cast her as Cady, knowing she could get to that point of being Regina, but you let her be the innocent side, too.”

Mean Girls

4. How did they get Amy Poehler’s pet Chihuahua in the film to nibble on her nipples?
“They, like, pinned a piece of a cocktail wiener into her bra,” McAdams said. “I thought this dog was going to tear her apart. It was very effective.”

See video: Amy Poehler’s ‘Parks & Recreation’ Finale Fantasy Includes Lighting the Set on Fire

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5. Mariah Carey loves “Mean Girls” and tells Lindsay Lohan about it all the time
“Mariah and I have the same makeup artist,” Lohan said. “Whenever I see her, she does always say, ‘On Wednesdays, I wear pink.’ She loves that movie.

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6. Glenn Cocco is a real person
“I tried to use real names in writing because it’s just easier” Fey said about writing the script. “My older brother’s good friend is Glenn Cocco. He’s a film editor in Los Angeles, and I imagine it’s a pain in the butt for him. Someone said to me you could buy a shirt at Target that says ‘You go, Glenn Cocco!’ That was unexpected.”

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7. Lindsay Lohan tried to explain her beef with Hilary Duff to her elder co-stars
“She tried to explain to Amy and me her beef with Hilary Duff, but we couldn’t crack it,” Fey said. “But we were pretending we could follow it.”

Also read: Hilary Duff Is Down for More ‘Lizzie McGuire’: ‘Why Not?’

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8. Tina Fey was driven in a Winnebago from “SNL” in New York to the “Mean Girls” set in Toronto
“I don’t remember if I was weird about flying or if it was the timing, but sometimes I would go do ‘SNL,’ then I would get in a Winnebago at two in the morning and be driven to Toronto,” Fey said. “It’s so stupid.”

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9. Lacey Chabert’s character Gretchen Wieners was supposed to be thin and gangly
“I thought I was really wrong for Gretchen,” Chabert said. “The character description physically was very different from me.”

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‘Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again’ Dances to $3.4 Million at Thursday Box Office

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again” danced to $3.4 million at the Thursday box office, while Sony’s “The Equalizer 2” took in $3.1 million at the previews.

In 2008, the original “Mamma Mia!” earned a modest $27 million opening weekend while serving as counter-programming to “The Dark Knight,” which opened the same weekend. (The adaptation of a London and Broadway stage hit eventually earned nearly $610 million worldwide on a $52 million budget.)

Independent trackers are expecting that “Here We Go Again” will improve on the opening of the original “Mamma Mia!,” projecting an opening of $32-34 million from 3,200 locations while carrying a higher production budget of $74 million.

Also Read: ‘Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again’ Is ‘Charming’ and ‘Joyful,’ Critics Say

Picking up a decade after the first film, “Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again!” sees Sophie (Amanda Seyfried) prepare for motherhood by learning about how her mom, Donna (Meryl Streep) became pregnant with her while meeting the three men who later came back into her life as Sophie’s potential father.

The ensemble cast sees Cher, Pierce Brosnan, Stellan Skarsgard, Colin Firth, Julie Walters, Dominic Cooper and Christine Baranski return, with flashback scenes that include Lily James as a young Donna with Jeremy Irvine, Hugh Skinner, and Josh Dylan. Ol Parker (“The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”) wrote and directed the film, which has an early Rotten Tomatoes score of 80 percent.

Antoine Fuqua’s “The Equalizer 2” is also opening this weekend, with Denzel Washington reprising his role from the first action film. 2014’s “The Equalizer” opened to $34 million and made $101 million domestically. The sequel is projected to open to slightly less with $27-30 million from 3,300 locations, though Sony is expecting higher weekday grosses.

Also Read: ‘The Equalizer 2’ Film Review: Denzel Washington Returns as a Thinking Man’s Action Hero

“The Equalizer 2” holds a score of 47 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.

Opening in targeted release is BH Tilt’s “Unfriended: Dark Web,” a sequel to Blumhouse’s 2015 social media horror film “Unfriended.” Produced on a $1 million budget and depicted through a computer desktop, “Unfriended” made $64 million worldwide off a $15 million opening. “Dark Web” is expected to make half that opening, with trackers projecting a $6-8 million start. “Dark Web” holds a score of 57 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.

Finally, Lionsgate’s Summit Entertainment and Codeblack Films will send in the Oakland race dramedy “Blindspotting” for limited release this weekend.

Earning critical acclaim at Sundance, the film is written by and stars Daveed Diggs and Rafael Casal as a black ex-convict trying to peacefully finish his probation period. The film will open on 14 screens in five markets: Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, San Fransisco and Oakland, where the film takes place. It currently has an 91 percent RT score.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Does ‘Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

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‘Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again’ Film Review: Lily James Makes Up for Near-Absence of Meryl Streep

‘Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again’ Film Review: Lily James Makes Up for Near-Absence of Meryl Streep

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Mamma Mia! The Movie” wasn’t exactly crying out for a sequel. Adapted from a stage musical, which was based in turn on the back catalogue of Sweden’s finest pop group, ABBA, it had barely enough plot to sustain one film, let alone two. But it also grossed $615 million from a $52 million budget, making it the fifth most lucrative film of 2008. Faced with those numbers, which producer was going to quibble about a little detail like plot?

As for the writer-director, Ol Parker, he doesn’t come up with any urgent artistic reasons for the existence of its follow-up,”Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again,” but he does make it surprisingly watchable, and he manages to overcome some mountainous obstacles. For one thing, the first film, directed by Phyllida Lloyd, was shot on the Greek island of Skopelos, whereas this one has moved to a less idyllic — and less sunny — Croatian location. Parker has to resort to a lot of tight framing — and, by the look of things, a lot of green screen — to disguise the fact that the characters aren’t where they were 10 years ago.

Also Read: ‘Mamma Mia 2’ Trailer: Watch Cher as Meryl Streep’s Mom (Video)

For another thing, “Here We Go Again” doesn’t have more than a few seconds of the first film’s star, Meryl Streep. “Mamma Mia! The Movie” ended with her character, Donna, living happily ever after with her long-lost true love, Sam (Pierce Brosnan), so it’s depressing to learn in the sequel that she has been dead for a year. Meanwhile, her daughter Sophie (Amanda Seyfried), who was last seen sailing off into the sunset with her oddly named boyfriend, Sky (Dominic Cooper), has apparently spent much of the last decade restoring her mother’s rustic hotel.

As she prepares for its grand reopening, the narrative flashes back to 1979, whereupon it retells the story that was told in “Mamma Mia! The Movie.” The story, you may remember, is that Donna slept with three men one summer, 20 years earlier, and so she didn’t know which of them was Sophie’s biological father: Sam (Brosnan), Harry (Colin Firth) or Bill (Stellan Skarsgard). “Here We Go Again” shows us exactly what happened, with the twentysomething Donna played by Streep, and given that the first film stated that Donna’s mother was (a) a severe Catholic, and (b) dead. But it’s unlikely that anyone will object to hearing an icon sing “Fernando.”

Besides, if Donna’s mother can return from the grave for “Here We Go Again,” maybe Donna herself can be revived for “Mamma Three-a” a decade from now.

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‘Mamma Mia 2’ Trailer: Watch Cher as Meryl Streep’s Mom (Video)

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‘First Reformed’ Film Review: Paul Schrader and Ethan Hawke Channel Robert Bresson

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Before he wrote and directed movies, Paul Schrader was a film critic, best known for his book “Transcendental Style in Film: Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer.” Director Robert Bresson’s “Diary of a Country Priest” has always been a key film for Schrader, with Bresson’s ascetic Catholicism mirroring Schrader’s fully-absorbed Calvinism. And now Schrader has made “First Reformed,” a film that even freshman film students will be able to easily connect to this influential earlier movie.

“First Reformed” is about a country priest, and he keeps a diary. And, like the hero of Bresson’s film (and the Georges Bernanos novel on which it is based), he’s got stomach cancer. (Bresson’s hero lived on bread and wine; Schrader’s prefers whiskey, but tells a concerned colleague that his only alcoholic intake is “a little wine with dinner.”)

There’s more than homage going on here, though. As Schrader’s hero takes a bleaker look at life, and considers committing an extreme act as a desperate attempt to find resonance and morality in the world, he stands alongside the protagonists of such Schrader-written films as “Taxi Driver,” “American Gigolo” and “Light Sleeper,” three works the filmmaker has connected as his “night trilogy.”

Also Read: ‘Suburbicon,’ ‘The Shape of Water,’ ‘Victoria & Abdul’ Headed to Venice Film Festival

The priest is Reverend Toller (Ethan Hawke), and he tends to a small, barely-attended church that remains open solely because of its historical import; located in upstate New York, the church was once a stop on the Underground Railroad for Canada-bound escaped slaves. Nowadays, it’s mainly a tourist attraction that operates under the aegis of a larger mega-church run by the affable Jeffers (Cedric Antonio Kyles, better known as Cedric the Entertainer).

One of Toller’s few parishioners, Mary (Amanda Seyfried) asks him to counsel her husband Michael (Philip Ettinger, “Compliance”); Mary is pregnant, but Michael, a committed environmental activist, thinks it’s immoral to bring a child into this decaying world.

Spending time with Michael convinces Toller that God objects to man’s destruction of the world, which puts him in an awkward position with Barq (Michael Gaston, “The Leftovers”), a wealthy local industrialist — and major contributor to both churches — who happens also to be a world-class polluter.

Also Read: Ethan Hawke, Noomi Rapace to Star in True Story Thriller ‘Stockholm’

But “First Reformed” is less about that plot than it is character, and Schrader and Hawke have collaborated on a searing portrait. Toller is devout in his faith, and he can be good with people, but he bears the pain of having a child die (which in turn destroyed his marriage), making him believe that he will never know love again. He had a brief affair with his well-meaning assistant Esther (Victoria Hill, “December Boys”) but now keeps her at arm’s length before devastating her with a cruel verbal kiss-off; Schrader at least grants the character the grace of performing a lovely rendition of “Leaning on the Everlasting Arms” over the film’s denouement.

This is Schrader at his sparest; characters rarely look warm — the cinematography by Alexander Dynan (“Dog Eat Dog”) accentuates the wintry bleakness — the camera rarely moves during scenes, silences and awkward pauses abound, and the score by Brian Williams is used sparingly, but always effectively.

Also Read: ‘Twin Peaks’ Revival Reveals Entire 217-Person Cast

As ever, the director has a real gift at working with actors; Richard Pryor’s dramatic chops surprised viewers of Schrader’s “Blue Collar” back in 1978, and Cedric the Entertainer’s solid turn here should do likewise. Seyfried’s verge-of-tears acting has never gotten so powerful a context, and Ettinger’s chilling intensity makes an impact over just a few scenes.

This is Hawke’s show all the way, though, and he’s never less than astonishing to watch. Plumbing the depths of Toller’s despair takes him to places we’ve never seen him go on film before, and the results are electrifying even as they are mournful.

Toller’s misery builds to an ending that some will find perfect and others confounding, but either way, it’s sure to be discussed. (Personally, I lean toward letting the mystery be, so it worked for me.) Paul Schrader has always been a faith-based filmmaker in the truest and most challenging sense, and “First Reformed” is the sort of stimulating work that a writer-director of a certain age can deliver when he returns to his creative sweet spot; rejoice, Schrader fans, rejoice.

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‘Mamma Mia 2’ Trailer: Watch Cher as Meryl Streep’s Mom (Video)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The final trailer for Universal’s “Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again” has been released, and in it, we get a bigger glimpse at Cher’s grandmotherly role in the film.

In the trailer, Amanda Seyfried’s character Sophie tells her fathers (played by Colin Firth, Pierce Brosnan, and Stellan Skarsgård) that she is pregnant.

“I never did ask you guys, what happened when you met my mother?” she asks her dads, at which point the trailer pivots to telling the story of a young Donna (Meryl Streep’s role), who is played by Lily James.

See Video: ‘Mamma Mia’ Sequel Trailer Teases Key Character Death, Cher’s Grandmotherly Role

Of course, Streep played the family matriarch in the 2008 adaptation of the famous Broadway musical.

Sophie’s grandmother, Cher, shows up to a party that she’s not invited to after she commits “to being a grandmother.”

Also Read: Universal Sets ‘Mamma Mia’ Sequel for 2018: ‘Here We Go Again!’

“That’s the best kind of party, little girl,” Cher’s character says.

“Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again” will hit theaters on July 20.

Watch the trailer above.

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Cher Caps Off Universal Session With An ABBA Performance – CinemaCon

Read on: Deadline.

After previewing an extended clip for the upcoming sequel Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again, which features an elaborate performance sequence to ABBA’s “Super Trouper” led by Cher, Universal wrapped its CinemaCon presentation today with a s…

Amanda Seyfried Joins Milo Ventimiglia In ‘The Art of Racing In The Rain’ For Fox 2000

Read on: Deadline.

EXCLUSIVE: Amanda Seyfried is set to co-star as Milo Ventimiglia’s wife Eve in Fox 2000’s film adaptation of The Art of Racing In The Rain, directed by Simon Curtis (My Week with Marilyn, Woman in Gold, Goodbye Christopher Robin).
Based on Garth Stein’s 2008 bestselling novel which is about Enzo, a family dog who evaluates his life through the lessons learned by his human owner Denny Swift (Ventimiglia), a professional race-car driver.
Martin Donovan has also been tapped…

‘First Reformed’ Trailer: Ethan Hawke & Amanda Seyfried In Paul Schrader’s Crisis-Of-Faith Thriller

Read on: Deadline.

“Even a pastor needs a pastor.” Here’s the inaugural trailer for First Reformed, the thriller from writer-director Paul Schrader that sees Ethan Hawke have a crisis of faith after encouraging his son to join the military and then having to bury him six months later. “I know that nothing can change,” he says, “and I know there is no hope.”
Here’s the logline: Reverend Ernst Toller (Hawke) is a solitary, middle-aged parish pastor at a small Dutch Reform church in upstate…

‘Gringo’ Film Review: Mexican Kidnap Comedy Gets Lost on the Road to Nowhere

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The cynical action comedy “Gringo” aims right for an imagined sweet spot where “Midnight Run” and “Ruthless People” meet, get drunk, and roll “Fargo” in an alley somewhere. But this wildly uneven mix of nasty and nervy — which drops a hapless corporate Everyman played by David Oyelowo into a pinging kidnap scenario in Mexico — is primarily a time-waster, trotting out clichéd misadventure tropes and predictable zigzags in a manner neither terribly funny nor suspenseful.

Shot two years ago from a script written years prior, which would explain why its drug kingpin character is named The Black Panther (oops!), one imagines “Gringo” is getting released now because an executive somewhere found it behind a couch, gathering dust, and felt sorry for it.

“Selma” star Oyelowo plays Harold, an operations supervisor at a Chicago-based pharmaceuticals company called Promethium; in movie terms, he looks ready to accept his award for Milquetoast Employee of the Year. He raps along to “Gettin’ Jiggy Wit It” in the car, has a beautiful wife (Thandie Newton, clocking in) bleeding his bank account dry, and might just lose his job if a rumored sale to a conglomerate goes through.

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Harold can’t quite accept, however, that his buddy Richard (Joel Edgerton), the company president, wouldn’t look out for him in just such a case. Richard’s so openly jerkish, however, that it makes Harold seem woefully deluded, an early sign that the movie might be mistaking beleaguered for thick-headed.

Harold wises up on a business trip to their company’s lab in Mexico, accompanied by Richard and co-president Elaine (Charlize Theron), a porcelain viper who takes one look at the photo wall of many smiling brown children in the office of their lab manager Sanchez (Hernán Mendoza) and snarls, “Do they not sell condoms down here?” (In this movie’s humor math, a racist joke is okay if uttered by a sexy, white Oscar winner.) Harold indeed learns, surreptitiously, that he won’t survive the upcoming merger.

But Richard and Elaine have another secret up their sleeves, and it’s the real purpose of their trip: to pressure Sanchez to cut off a longstanding off-books relationship with a cartel king — the aforementioned non-Marvel big cat (Carlos Corona, “Cantinflas”) — so that Promethium will look squeaky-clean for its impending sale.

Also Read: Gal Gadot Almost Played Furiosa in ‘Mad Max: Fury Road’: ‘I Had So Many Almosts’

Our hero’s planned revenge for his own problem, which involves enlisting a pair of local motel employees for a fake kidnap scheme that would trigger the company’s insurance payoff, sets a rapidly escalating chain of violent events in motion that could offer a real chance for Harold to escape his life.

As appealing an actor as Oyelowo is, though, it’s nearly impossible to care about Harold’s predicament because the movie (its haphazardly constructed screenplay credited to Anthony Tambakis and Matthew Stone) has little finesse when it comes to characterization, plotting or eccentric action. It’s one of those movies in which the kingpin’s professed love for the Beatles in one scene spells certain death later on when someone stupidly disagrees with his music tastes. (The question never gets old: Don’t people in movies see movies?)

Randomness and coincidence is integral to the architecture of “Gringo,” and director Nash Edgerton (Joel’s brother) cares little for whether it makes sense or not. Sharlto Copley’s a reliably gritty presence, for instance, but does his ex-mercenary aid worker, hired away from Haiti to find Harold in Mexico, also have to be the boss’s brother? I’m still trying to figure out the purpose of Harry Treadaway’s and Amanda Seyfried’s characters, a pair of dating LA guitar shop workers whose own Mexican trip conveniently coincides with everything in the movie for no believable purpose. (Feel a twinge of regret, if you will, for what this movie says about Seyfried’s career.)

Also Read: Troye Sivan Joins Joel Edgerton’s Coming Out Drama ‘Boy Erased’

Elsewhere, Joel Edgerton looks confused as to whether his character is mean-funny, or dumb-venal, or just bored. Theron, on the other hand, is fully committed to the retrograde schlock of her sexually rapacious and willfully cruel boardroom villainess, as if she’d bathed in a perfume called “Network” just for the sexist trolls in the audience.

For a movie with such a blinkered view of humanity, one that only draws attention to Harold’s Nigerian ancestry so it can let us know his uncle scammed people with prince letters, it’s almost surprising how hard it tries to cobble together a happy ending for its good characters, and just desserts for its baddies. It’s the rare dark comedy that ultimately feels insecure about its dim outlook.

And what of the country where “Gringo” is mostly set? Mexico deserves better, surely, than a bunch of corrupt characters, none of whom even make the poster. On second thought, maybe that’s a good thing for the land where this movie goes to die.



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‘Mamma Mia 2’ Trailer Teases Meryl Streep’s Character’s Death

Read on: Variety.

How can you resist the trailer for “Mamma Mia!: Here We Go Again”? Universal Pictures debuted the first look at the highly-anticipated sequel to 2008’s “Mamma Mia!” on Thursday morning. The footage shows a pregnant Sophie (Amanda Seyfried) welcoming her mom’s best friends Tanya (Christine Baranski) and Rosie (Julie Walters) back to Greece to help […]

‘Mean Girls’ Cast Members Set Up GoFundMe for Las Vegas Shooting Victims

Read on: Variety.

On Oct. 3, “Mean Girls” cast members set up a GoFundMe for Las Vegas shooting victims. Mean Girls Day typically honors the comedy classic’s legacy with memes and movies quotes, but this year Amanda Seyfried, Lacey Chabert, Jonathan Bennett, and Daniel Franzese made a video urging fans to donate to their “Mean Girls for Las […]

9 ‘Mean Girls’ Secrets Revealed, From Amy Poehler’s Fake Boobs to Lindsay Lohan’s Feud

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

A decade after their movie debuted in theaters and became an instant comedy classic, the cast of “Mean Girls” is reunited once again in 2014 for an Entertainment Weekly photo shoot.

The stars of the film, Lindsay Lohan, Tina Fey, Rachel McAdams, Amanda Seyfried and Lacey Chabert, were dressed like true Plastics in heels and high-end threads for the reunion.

The women then sat down to share stories about what went down on the set, including never-before-revealed details about the movie.

See photos: The Evolution of Zac Efron: From Squeaky Clean ‘High School’ Star to Raunchy Frat King

Fans of the 2004 film will be crushed to know just how close they came to seeing a “Mean Girls” sequel or who Fey had in mind originally to play Cady Heron.

TheWrap has assembled nine revelations the ladies divulged during their interviews below.

Paramount

1. Tina Fey now regrets not doing a “Mean Girls” sequel
“At the time we did want to start the conversation about the sequel, and for whatever reason I was like, ‘No!!! We shouldn’t do that!’” Fey said. “Now I look back and I’m like, ‘Why?’ But now, no — it’s too late.”

See video: Tina Fey Knows How to Remain Anonymous in Her Nude Celebrity Photos

Paramount

2. Lindsay Lohan wanted to be Regina George, Rachel McAdams auditioned for Cady and Amanda Seyfried was just happy to get cast
Lohan admitted that she went to war with director Mark Waters over giving her the part of Plastic Queen Regina, saying: “I was still 17 years old and I wanted to be the cool girl on set.” The part eventually went to McAdams, even though she had auditioned to play Cady Heron. When Seyfried got the part of Karen Smith, she was just relieved to have any role in the film.

“I just wanted to be in the movie. To be asked to play Karen, I was like, ‘Great! Whatever!’” Seyfried says.

Also read: How Our Dumb Celebrity Media Covered Lindsay Lohan’s Miscarriage ‘Confession’

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3. Tina Fey had to be convinced that Lindsay Lohan was right for the part of Cady
“At some point I was like, “Oh, should Lindsay be Regina?” Fey said. “And then Mark and Lorne [Michaels] had the good sense to say, ‘No, she gets to turn into Regina.’ You work backward from that and you cast her as Cady, knowing she could get to that point of being Regina, but you let her be the innocent side, too.”

Mean Girls

4. How did they get Amy Poehler’s pet Chihuahua in the film to nibble on her nipples?
“They, like, pinned a piece of a cocktail wiener into her bra,” McAdams said. “I thought this dog was going to tear her apart. It was very effective.”

See video: Amy Poehler’s ‘Parks & Recreation’ Finale Fantasy Includes Lighting the Set on Fire

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5. Mariah Carey loves “Mean Girls” and tells Lindsay Lohan about it all the time
“Mariah and I have the same makeup artist,” Lohan said. “Whenever I see her, she does always say, ‘On Wednesdays, I wear pink.’ She loves that movie.

Paramount

6. Glenn Cocco is a real person
“I tried to use real names in writing because it’s just easier” Fey said about writing the script. “My older brother’s good friend is Glenn Cocco. He’s a film editor in Los Angeles, and I imagine it’s a pain in the butt for him. Someone said to me you could buy a shirt at Target that says ‘You go, Glenn Cocco!’ That was unexpected.”

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7. Lindsay Lohan tried to explain her beef with Hilary Duff to her elder co-stars
“She tried to explain to Amy and me her beef with Hilary Duff, but we couldn’t crack it,” Fey said. “But we were pretending we could follow it.”

Also read: Hilary Duff Is Down for More ‘Lizzie McGuire’: ‘Why Not?’

Paramount

8. Tina Fey was driven in a Winnebago from “SNL” in New York to the “Mean Girls” set in Toronto
“I don’t remember if I was weird about flying or if it was the timing, but sometimes I would go do ‘SNL,’ then I would get in a Winnebago at two in the morning and be driven to Toronto,” Fey said. “It’s so stupid.”

Paramount

9. Lacey Chabert’s character Gretchen Wieners was supposed to be thin and gangly
“I thought I was really wrong for Gretchen,” Chabert said. “The character description physically was very different from me.”

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Ethan Hawke-Amanda Seyfried Thriller ‘First Reformed’ Bought by A24 for U.S.

Read on: Variety.

A24 has acquired U.S. rights to Paul Schrader’s thriller “First Reformed,” starring Ethan Hawke and Amanda Seyfried. The film premiered on Aug. 31 at the Venice Film Festival, followed by screenings at Telluride and Toronto. A24 plans a 2018 release. Hawke portrays a mysterious reverend based in a small town in upstate New York. When… Read more »

Netflix Scores Clive Owen, Amanda Seyfried Thriller ‘Anon’ for $4 Million

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Netflix has acquired U.S. and some international rights to Andrew Niccol’s sci-fi thriller “Anon” for a price in the $4 million range, TheWrap has learned.

The film stars Clive Owen as an investigator looking to solve a series of crimes in a future world with no privacy or anonymity and Amanda Seyfried as a young woman who has apparently beat the system and vanished.

Niccol produced the film with Oliver Simon and Daniel Baur at K5 Film and K5 Media Group handled the financing. CAA arranged the film’s funding and negotiated the domestic deal, while Sierra/Affinity was in charge of international sales.

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CAA screened “Anon” last Thursday in Toronto, before the Toronto International Film Festival officially got underway. It was the first year of the agency’s pre-screening venture, which also resulted in the $4 million sale of Keanu Reeves-headlined “Replicas” to Entertainment Studios.

“Anon” is the latest film acquired by the streaming giant, which continues to cast an outsize shadow on film festivals with its prodigious bag of cash. Netflix shelled out $4 million for “Kodachrome,” starring Ed Harris, and more than $3 million for documentary “Jim and Andy: The Great Beyond.”

The streaming service also premiered Angelina Jolie’s “First They Killed My Father” at the festival.

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‘First Reformed’ Review: Paul Schrader and Ethan Hawke Channel Robert Bresson

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Before he wrote and directed movies, Paul Schrader was a film critic, best known for his book “Transcendental Style in Film: Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer,” and Robert Bresson’s “Diary of a Country Priest” has always been a key film for Schrader, with Bresson’s ascetic Catholicism mirroring Schrader’s fully-absorbed Calvinism. And now Schrader has made “First Reformed,” a film that even freshman film students will be able to easily connect to this influential earlier movie.

“First Reformed” is about a country priest, and he keeps a diary. And, like the hero of Bresson’s film (and the novel by Georges Bernanos on which it is based), he’s got stomach cancer. (Bresson’s hero lived on bread and wine; Schrader’s prefers whiskey, but tells a concerned colleague that his only alcoholic intake is “a little wine with dinner.”)

There’s more than homage going on here, though: as Schrader’s hero takes a bleaker look at life, and considers committing an extreme act as a desperate attempt to find resonance and morality in the world, he stands alongside the protagonists of such Schrader-written films as “Taxi Driver,” “American Gigolo” and “Light Sleeper,” three works the filmmaker has connected as his “night trilogy.”

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The priest is Reverend Toller (Ethan Hawke), and he tends to a small, barely-attended church that remains open solely because of its historical import; located in upstate New York, the church was once a stop on the Underground Railroad for Canada-bound escaped slaves. Nowadays, it’s mainly a tourist attraction that operates under the aegis of a larger mega-church run by the affable Jeffers (Cedric Antonio Kyles, better known as Cedric the Entertainer).

One of Toller’s few parishioners, Mary (Amanda Seyfried) asks him to counsel her husband Michael (Philip Ettinger, “Compliance”); Mary is pregnant, but Michael, a committed environmental activist, thinks it’s immoral to bring a child into this decaying world. Spending time with Michael convinces Toller that God objects to man’s destruction of the world, which puts him in an awkward position with Barq (Michael Gaston, “The Leftovers”), a wealthy local industrialist — and major contributor to both churches — who happens also to be a world-class polluter.

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But “First Reformed” is less about that plot than it is character, and Schrader and Hawke have collaborated on a searing portrait. Toller is devout in his faith, and he can be good with people, but he bears the pain of having a child die (which in turn destroyed his marriage), making him believe that he will never know love again. He had a brief affair with his well-meaning assistant Esther (Victoria Hill, “December Boys”) but now keeps her at arm’s length before devastating her with a cruel verbal kiss-off; Schrader at least grants the character the grace of performing a lovely rendition of “Leaning on the Everlasting Arms” over the film’s denouement.

This is Schrader at his sparest; characters rarely look warm — the cinematography by Alexander Dynan (“Dog Eat Dog”) accentuates the wintry bleakness — the camera rarely moves during scenes, silences and awkward pauses abound, and the score by Brian Williams is used sparingly, but always effectively.

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As ever, the director has a real gift at working with actors; Richard Pryor’s dramatic chops surprised viewers of Schrader’s “Blue Collar” back in 1978, and Cedric the Entertainer’s solid turn here should do likewise. Seyfried’s verge-of-tears acting has never gotten so powerful a context, and Ettinger’s chilling intensity makes an impact over just a few scenes.

This is Hawke’s show all the way, though, and he’s never less than astonishing to watch. Plumbing the depths of Toller’s despair takes him to places we’ve never seen him go on film before, and the results are electrifying even as they are mournful.

Toller’s misery builds to an ending that some will find perfect and others confounding, but either way, it’s sure to be discussed. (Personally, I lean toward letting the mystery be, so it worked for me.) Paul Schrader has always been a faith-based filmmaker in the truest and most challenging sense, and “First Reformed” is the sort of stimulating work that a writer-director of a certain age can deliver when he returns to his creative sweet spot; rejoice, Schrader fans, rejoice.

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