The Rock, Katy Perry, Ellen React to Ariana Grande Manchester Concert Bombing: ‘Brokenhearted’

As news emerged that a deadly bombing had devastated the crowd at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, the music industry’s biggest names paid tribute to the victims on Monday

“Baywatch” star Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson urged Manchester to “stay strong,” tweeting: “Our prayers and strength to the victims and their families involved in this tragedy in Manchester.”

Katy Perry said she was, “Broken hearted for the families tonight. Broken hearted for Ari. Broken hearted for the state of this world.”

“My thoughts, prayers and tears for all those affected by the Manchester tragedy tonight. I’m sending all my love,” Taylor Swift said.

Greater Manchester police confirmed that 19 people were killed and at least 50 were injured. The casualties are currently being treated at six hospitals in the northern England city.

The incident is being treated as a terror attack with initial signs pointing to that of a suicide bomber.

Also Read: 19 People Killed at Ariana Grande’s Manchester UK Concert After Explosions, Police Say

Grande herself tweeted her grief, saying she was “Broken. from the bottom of my heart, i am so so sorry. i don’t have words.”

British prime minister Theresa May issued a statement after the deadly incident. “We are working to establish the full details of what is being treated by the police as an appalling terrorist attack. All our thoughts are with the victims and the families of those who have been affected,” May said, according to the Guardian.

Cher, Ellen DeGeneres, Bruno Mars, Justin Timberlake, Ellie Goulding, Demi Lovato and Nicki Minaj are among those sending their to sympathy and prayers to everyone in the northern England city.

See the tweets below.

My thoughts, prayers and tears for all those affected by the Manchester tragedy tonight. I’m sending all my love.

Taylor Swift (@taylorswift13) May 23, 2017

My thoughts and prayers go out to everyone affected in Manchester.

Selena Gomez (@selenagomez) May 23, 2017

This story is so sad and so scary. Sending all my love to Manchester.

Ellen DeGeneres (@TheEllenShow) May 23, 2017

No words can describe how I feel about what happened in Manchester. I don’t wanna believe that the world we live in could be so cruel.

— Bruno Mars (@BrunoMars) May 23, 2017

Our prayers and strengh to the victims and their families involved in this tragedy in Manchester. Stay strong. @ArianaGrande ????????

Dwayne Johnson (@TheRock) May 22, 2017

broken.
from the bottom of my heart, i am so so sorry. i don’t have words.

Ariana Grande (@ArianaGrande) May 23, 2017

Prayers Up for Manchester. ???????????????????????? Regardless of what you believe in, please take a moment for everyone affected.

— Mojo Rawley (@MojoRawleyWWE) May 23, 2017

Tearing up imagining innocent concert goers losing their lives.. praying for everyone and all #arianators. ????????????????????????

Demi Lovato (@ddlovato) May 22, 2017

My heart hurts for my sister, Ariana & every family affected by this tragic event in the U.K. Innocent lives lost. I’m so sorry to hear this

NICKI MINAJ (@NICKIMINAJ) May 23, 2017

MY PRAYERS GO OUT TO PPL OF MANCHESTER…HAD SPECIAL TIMES THERE FROM YOUTH & BEYOND

Cher (@cher) May 22, 2017

My thoughts and prayers are with all those affected by this horrific act in Manchester. We need to do better. We need to LOVE ONE ANOTHER.

Justin Timberlake (@jtimberlake) May 23, 2017

Broken hearted for the families tonight. Broken hearted for Ari. Broken hearted for the state of this world. ????

KATY PERRY (@katyperry) May 23, 2017

R.I.P to all those innocent people who had their lives taken from them last night in Manchester. Thoughts with those affected. #StayStrong pic.twitter.com/RiaejyFzoZ

— Manchester United (@ManUnitedWorld) May 23, 2017

every musician feels sick & responsible tonight—shows should be safe for you. truly a worst nightmare. sending love to manchester & ari

— Lorde (@lorde) May 23, 2017

Sending love to those affected in Manchester.

— Ellie Goulding (@elliegoulding) May 22, 2017

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19 People Killed at Ariana Grande’s Manchester UK Concert After Explosions, Police Say

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Ariana Grande Is ‘Broken’ After Concert Bombing: ‘From the Bottom of My Heart, I Am So Sorry’

Ariana Grande offered her condolences to the victims of the deadly bombing following her Manchester, England, concert on Monday night.

“Broken. from the bottom of my heart, i am so so sorry. i don’t have words,” the singer tweeted.

broken.
from the bottom of my heart, i am so so sorry. i don’t have words.

Ariana Grande (@ArianaGrande) May 23, 2017

Greater Manchester police confirmed that 19 people were killed and at least 50 were injured. The casualties are currently being treated at six hospitals in the northern England city.

Latest statement on incident at Manchester Arena @CCIanHopkins pic.twitter.com/GEABqAk5rr

— G M Police (@gmpolice) May 23, 2017

TMZ reported Monday night the Dangerous Woman World Tour has now been suspended. Grande will not perform Thursday in London and has decided for now to put the entire European tour on hold. After her England shows, she was set to perform in Belgium, Poland, Germany and Switzerland.

Also Read: 19 People Killed at Ariana Grande’s Manchester UK Concert After Explosions, Police Say

The incident is being treated as a terror attack with initial signs pointing to that of a suicide bomber.

“The choice of venue, the timing and the mode of attack all suggest this was terrorism,” said a U.S. counter terrorism official who also spoke on condition of anonymity, according to Reuters.

Also Read: Ariana Grande Slams Male Fan Who ‘Objectified’ Her: ‘I Am Not a Piece of Meat’ (Photo)

Britain is on its second-highest alert level of “severe” meaning an attack by militants is considered highly likely.

Related stories from TheWrap:

19 People Killed at Ariana Grande’s Manchester UK Concert After Explosions, Police Say

Ariana Grande, John Legend to Re-Record ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Title Song for Live-Action Adaptation

Ariana Grande Slams Male Fan Who ‘Objectified’ Her: ‘I Am Not a Piece of Meat’ (Photo)

‘Justice League:’ Zack Snyder Steps Down as Director After Family Tragedy, Joss Whedon to Take Over

Zack Snyder has stepped down as director of Warner Bros.’ Fall tentpole “Justice League” following a family tragedy, TheWrap has confirmed.

Joss Whedon is filling in as director to finish the film which comes out November 17. Snyder and Whedon have been collaborating together for more than a month, persons with knowledge of the production tell TheWrap. Whedon and Snyder have been writing new scenes for additional photography scheduled for early summer. The collaboration serves as Whedon’s entrance into the DC extended universe — Whedon has also signed on to direct a standalone “Batgirl” film.

Snyder’s daughter, Autumn Snyder, died by suicide in March at age 20. Snyder and his wife Deborah Snyder, who is a producer on “Justice League,” had initially taken a short break to mourn, returning to the production after two weeks. They are now steeping aside entirely.

“In my mind, I thought it was a cathartic thing to go back to work, to just bury myself and see if that was way through it,” Snyder told The Hollywood Reporter, which first reported the story. “The demands of this job are pretty intense. It is all consuming. And in the last two months I’ve come to the realization …I’ve decided to take a step back from the movie to be with my family, be with my kids, who really need me. They are all having a hard time. I’m having a hard time.”

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Film Community Powers Catalonia’s Rebound From Recession

Decimated by Spain’s financial crisis, which shriveled regional government and TV finance for its movies, the once-effervescent film hub of Catalonia is finally showing signs of recovery. Some early indicators: A live-action short Oscar nomination for Juanjo Giménez’s security-guard romance “Timecode.” Lluís Quílez’s post-apocalypse love story “Graffiti” made the Academy Award shortlist for shorts. Carla… Read more »

Review: U2 Reminds Americans What It Means to Be American

In March of 1987, When I was 11 years old, my mom came home from work saying downtown L.A. traffic was a mess because of U2.

“They were shooting a video on top of a liquor store,” she said.

“What’s U2?” I said.

“They’re a band. They sing the Martin Luther King song. They’re good.”

Also Read: U2 Honor ‘Lion’ Chris Cornell With ‘Running to Stand Still’ (Video)

The Martin Luther King song was “Pride (In the Name of Love),” their biggest hit at the time. The video was for “Where the Streets Have No Name,” from their new album “The Joshua Tree.” And U2 became my favorite band.

They returned to L.A. on Saturday night, to mess up traffic again. But also to remind us what it means to be American.

Like MLK, U2 began as outsiders — Bono told the Rose Bowl audience that even now, he and his Irish bandmates consider themselves guests in this country. And like Dr. King, they prevail upon us, inspire us, and yes, sometimes guilt us to remember the great country and people we’re supposed to be.

U2 is touring to celebrate the 30th anniversary of “The Joshua Tree,” the album that begins with “Where the Streets Have No Name.” It is an album in love with America conceptually, but afraid of America in execution.

In 1987, Bono seemed most concerned about the U.S.’s policy in El Salvador, the subject of the driving, still gut-punching “Bullet the Blue Sky.” Today, America’s problems seem even greater, the cause for alarm even more desperate.

Before launching into the Joshua Tree songs, the band played some of its first hits, opening with Larry Mullen’s Jr.’s jolting snare-stabbing intro for “Sunday Bloody Sunday.”

“I can’t believe the news today,” Bono sang. “Oh, I can’t close my eyes and make it go away.”

That’s an uncomfortably familiar feeling for anyone waking up on any given day in 2017 to more news of insane presidential tweets, more menacing sentiment for immigrants and refugees or ominous reports about Russian meddling.

But almost every U2 song has new resonance. The band’s unapologetic fixation with politics, once seen as preachy and uncool, is now everyone’s fixation. Its search for common ground and peace — maybe a little corny during times of prosperity and peace — is the search we all need to undertake to survive. We still haven’t found what we’re looking for.

U2’s 2001 comeback album, “All That You Can’t Leave Behind,” felt bizarrely like an answer to the Sept. 11 attacks, and “The Joshua Tree” can feel even more eerily like a summation of what we face now.

Is “With or Without You” about lovers, or Jesus, or countries that can’t survive alone or apart? A large percentage of the L.A. crowd was of Latino descent, with ancestors from countries very near Los Angeles, with economies, cultures and families closely intertwined with ours, all of which Donald Trump wants to divide with a wall.

Bono made no bones about his plan to tear down walls. He sang again and again the Simon and Garfunkel chorus: We’ve all… come… to look for America. In true American fashion, he wanted to sell us on something: Ourselves.

“Nothing scares the shite out of politicians more than millions of people organized,” he said. “The government should fear it’s citizens, not the other way around.”

But it wasn’t just preaching to a left-wing choir. In the last two decades, Bono has tried, as only an outside third-party can do, to bring together divided factions.

“The party of Lincoln, the party of Kennedy,” he said near the start of the show. “You are welcome here.”

That’s a message increasingly seen on signs outside businesses and churches in the age of Trump, a way of telling immigrants, refugees, and people of every background that they are loved. It isn’t a message usually extended to Republicans, since their leader is so often the one trying to do the excluding.

But Bono was trying to convert them, even flatter them. Pasadena, home of the Rose Bowl, is a rich place, and there were some expensive seats and luxury boxes. There had to be thousands of right-wingers in attendance. He lulled them in with Top 40 hits and stadium anthems and then, at the end of the night, gave the entire audience something few Americans encounter — a long look, via stadium widescreen, inside a Syrian refugee camp.

A young girl appeared and a voice off-camera told her to imagine she was speaking to a stadium full of people. What would she tell them?

She was quiet, and sweet. Not the terrorist our president has sometimes portrayed people like her of being.

She told our stadium full of people she wanted us to be happy — and that she wanted to come to America, where we are. Because our society is civil and good.

Many U2 fans — maybe especially those in the party of Lincoln — long ago adopted a just-play-your-hits policy toward Bono’s speechifying. But Saturday, we seemed to tune back in.

He’s still a great singer, but he’s become a more likable politician. He appealed to our best instincts, as when he noted that U.S. tax dollars have paid for major advances against HIV in Africa and worldwide. He has gotten heat before for included Republicans in his praise of U.S. efforts to stop HIV and AIDS. He includes them anyway.

“If you’re a U.S. taxpayer,” he told us Saturday, “you’re an AIDS activist.”

Then he launched into “One,” and didn’t have to say what was implicit.

The traffic in L.A. is even worse than it was for my mom 30 years ago. The Martin Luther King song still sings. And Bono still loves us, the way a mother loves us, upbraiding us to be the best we can be.

The more things change, the more they stay the same. Unless we change.

Related stories from TheWrap:

U2 Honor ‘Lion’ Chris Cornell With ‘Running to Stand Still’ (Video)

U2’s Bono Shredded on Twitter for Praising Mike Pence’s AIDS Efforts

U2 Delay New Album After Trump’s Election Victory: ‘World Is a Different Place’