Oscars Add New Round of Voting in Music Categories

In its annual adjustment of Oscar rules, the Academy has added a first round of voting to produce a shortlist in the Best Original Song and Best Original Score categories.

Both categories will now be narrowed down to 15 films before a second round of voting by the Music Branch produces the final five nominees. That marks a dramatic change from the existing rules that have called for a single round of nomination voting.

The music categories will now align with several other categories that use shortlists, including Best Documentary Feature, Best Foreign Language Film and the short-film categories.

Also Read: Academy Sets Key Dates for 2019 Oscars

In other rule changes, documentary features can now qualify for the Oscars by winning an award at a qualifying film festival. In the past, all feature docs had needed a theatrical release to qualify, though short docs could qualify via film-festival awards.

Other rule changes affected submission deadlines and the number of producers eligible to receive Oscars in the doc-feature and animated-feature categories.

The new rules were recommended by the individual branches, reviewed by the Academy’s Awards and Events Committee and then approved by the Board of Governors.

The board also approved new campaign regulations for the 91st Oscars next year. The most dramatic of those confirmed earlier reports that studios will be required to send materials to Oscars voters through an “Academy-approved mailing house.”

In the past, studios have been able to send screeners, invitations and other materials directly to Academy members, but the new rule brings the process in line with the one used by the Television Academy for Emmy voting.

Also Read: Bill Mechanic’s Academy Exit Blasts CEO Dawn Hudson, Inclusion Efforts, #MeToo Response

Additionally, the number of post-nomination screenings that include filmmaker Q&As has been trimmed to four, eliminating the two additional screenings that were allowed in the documentary and foreign-language categories.

The new rules, from the Academy press release:

Submission deadlines for awards eligibility have been changed. There is now one submission deadline – Monday, Oct. 1, 2018 – for the Animated Feature Film, Documentary Feature, Documentary Short Subject, Foreign Language Film, Animated Short Film and Live Action Short Film categories. The submission deadline for Best Picture and all other categories is Thursday, Nov. 15, by 5 p.m. PT.

In the Music categories, all members of the Music Branch will view films eligible for Original Score and film clips of eligible Original Songs and vote in a preliminary round to produce a shortlist of 15 titles in each category using the preferential voting system. Five nominees for Original Score and five nominees for Original Song will then be chosen by branch members in a second round of balloting also using preferential voting.

In the Documentary Feature category, films that have won a qualifying award at a competitive film festival will be eligible for Academy Awards consideration regardless of any prior public exhibition or distribution by nontheatrical means. The Documentary Feature Qualifying Festival List will be available later this spring. Furthermore, the critic review eligibility requirement has been expanded to include additional New York- and Los Angeles-based publications.

To align with credits eligibility in the Best Picture category, rules in both the Animated Feature Film and Documentary Feature categories have been updated to allow for more than one producer to be designated as a nominee.

In a procedural change, members of the Visual Effects Branch Nominating Committee will now be able to stream bake-off reels from the shortlisted films or attend satellite bake-off screenings and vote online. Previously, committee members were only able to vote in person at the Academy’s Visual Effects Bake-off in Los Angeles.

Other amendments to the rules include standard date changes and other “housekeeping” adjustments.

Rules are reviewed annually by individual branch and category committees. The Awards and Events Committee then reviews all proposed changes before presenting its recommendations to the Board of Governors for approval.

Also Read: 7 Hollywood Stars to Add Inclusion Riders to Their Projects, From Michael B. Jordan to Brie Larson (Photos)

Updated campaign regulations, which specify how companies and individuals may promote to Academy members any movies and achievements eligible for the 91st Academy Awards, are also presented to the Board of Governors for approval.

For the first time, studios, distributors and filmmakers will be required to use an Academy-approved mailing house to send sanctioned awards materials for eligible films to Academy members. Each approved mailing house will be provided with an official list of Academy members who have opted-in along with their contact information to facilitate both physical and digital mailings.

Additionally, the number of post-nominations screenings with a filmmaker Q&A is now limited to a maximum of four regardless of category or country in which the event takes place. This rule eliminates the two additional screenings currently allowed for Documentary and Foreign Language Film nominees.

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In its annual adjustment of Oscar rules, the Academy has added a first round of voting to produce a shortlist in the Best Original Song and Best Original Score categories.

Both categories will now be narrowed down to 15 films before a second round of voting by the Music Branch produces the final five nominees. That marks a dramatic change from the existing rules that have called for a single round of nomination voting.

The music categories will now align with several other categories that use shortlists, including Best Documentary Feature, Best Foreign Language Film and the short-film categories.

In other rule changes, documentary features can now qualify for the Oscars by winning an award at a qualifying film festival. In the past, all feature docs had needed a theatrical release to qualify, though short docs could qualify via film-festival awards.

Other rule changes affected submission deadlines and the number of producers eligible to receive Oscars in the doc-feature and animated-feature categories.

The new rules were recommended by the individual branches, reviewed by the Academy’s Awards and Events Committee and then approved by the Board of Governors.

The board also approved new campaign regulations for the 91st Oscars next year. The most dramatic of those confirmed earlier reports that studios will be required to send materials to Oscars voters through an “Academy-approved mailing house.”

In the past, studios have been able to send screeners, invitations and other materials directly to Academy members, but the new rule brings the process in line with the one used by the Television Academy for Emmy voting.

Additionally, the number of post-nomination screenings that include filmmaker Q&As has been trimmed to four, eliminating the two additional screenings that were allowed in the documentary and foreign-language categories.

The new rules, from the Academy press release:

Submission deadlines for awards eligibility have been changed. There is now one submission deadline – Monday, Oct. 1, 2018 – for the Animated Feature Film, Documentary Feature, Documentary Short Subject, Foreign Language Film, Animated Short Film and Live Action Short Film categories. The submission deadline for Best Picture and all other categories is Thursday, Nov. 15, by 5 p.m. PT.

In the Music categories, all members of the Music Branch will view films eligible for Original Score and film clips of eligible Original Songs and vote in a preliminary round to produce a shortlist of 15 titles in each category using the preferential voting system. Five nominees for Original Score and five nominees for Original Song will then be chosen by branch members in a second round of balloting also using preferential voting.

In the Documentary Feature category, films that have won a qualifying award at a competitive film festival will be eligible for Academy Awards consideration regardless of any prior public exhibition or distribution by nontheatrical means. The Documentary Feature Qualifying Festival List will be available later this spring. Furthermore, the critic review eligibility requirement has been expanded to include additional New York- and Los Angeles-based publications.

To align with credits eligibility in the Best Picture category, rules in both the Animated Feature Film and Documentary Feature categories have been updated to allow for more than one producer to be designated as a nominee.

In a procedural change, members of the Visual Effects Branch Nominating Committee will now be able to stream bake-off reels from the shortlisted films or attend satellite bake-off screenings and vote online. Previously, committee members were only able to vote in person at the Academy’s Visual Effects Bake-off in Los Angeles.

Other amendments to the rules include standard date changes and other “housekeeping” adjustments.

Rules are reviewed annually by individual branch and category committees. The Awards and Events Committee then reviews all proposed changes before presenting its recommendations to the Board of Governors for approval.

Updated campaign regulations, which specify how companies and individuals may promote to Academy members any movies and achievements eligible for the 91st Academy Awards, are also presented to the Board of Governors for approval.

For the first time, studios, distributors and filmmakers will be required to use an Academy-approved mailing house to send sanctioned awards materials for eligible films to Academy members. Each approved mailing house will be provided with an official list of Academy members who have opted-in along with their contact information to facilitate both physical and digital mailings.

Additionally, the number of post-nominations screenings with a filmmaker Q&A is now limited to a maximum of four regardless of category or country in which the event takes place. This rule eliminates the two additional screenings currently allowed for Documentary and Foreign Language Film nominees.

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Debra Granik, Gaspar Noe Films Selected for Cannes’ Directors’ Fortnight Lineup

Debra Granik, Romain Gavras, Ciro Guerra and Gaspar Noe are among the directors whose films will be included in the 50th Directors’ Fortnight, an independent sidebar that will run concurrently with the Cannes Film Festival in May.

Granik will go to Cannes with “Leave No Trace,” her first narrative film since the Oscar-nominated “Winter’s Bone” in 2010, and a film that received strong reviews when it premiered at Sundance in January.

Gavras, best known for his videos for M.I.A., Kanye West and Jay-Z and others, will be there with “Le monde est a toi,” while Guerra and his co-director Cristina Gallego, who made the Oscar-nominated “Embrace of the Serpent,” will bring “Birds of Passage” to Directors’ Fortnight.

The Argentinian provocateur Noe will bring “Climax” to the festival.

Also in the selection: Panos Cosmatos’ horror film “Mandy,” which features what is reportedly another wild performance from Nicolas Cage.

Directors’ Fortnight (Quinzaine des Realisateurs) was established in 1969, in the aftermath of a 1968 Cannes Film Festival that was cancelled midway through in solidarity with the protests sweeping through France. It was set up to offer a more daring and experimental slate than the main festival, and over the years provided the first Cannes exposure for such directors as Martin Scorsese, Werner Herzog, Michael Haneke and Spike Lee.

Also Read: Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

Directors’ Fortnight will open on May 9 and run through May 19.

The lineup:

“Pajaros de verano” (“Birds of Passage”), Ciro Guerra and Cristina Gallego (opening film)
“Amin,” Philippe Faucon
“Carmen Y Lola,” Arantxa Echevarria
“Climax,” Gaspar Noe
“Comprama un revolver,” Julio Hernandez Cordon
“Les Confins du Monde,” Guillaume Nicloux
“El motoarrebatador,” Augustin Toscano
“En Liberte,” Pierre Salvador
“Joueurs,” Marie Monge
“Leave No Trace,” Debra Granik
“Los Silencios,” Beatriz Seigner
“Ming wang xing shi ke,” Ming Zhang
“Mandy,” Panos Cosmatos
“Mirai,” Mamoru Hosoda
“Le monde est a toi,” Romain Gavras
“Petra,” Jaime Rosales
“Samouni Road,” Stefano Savona
“Teret,” Ognjen Glavonic
“Weldi,” Mohamed Ben Attia
“Troppa Grazia,” Gianni Zanasi (closing film)

Short films:
“Basses,” Felix Imbert
“Ce Magnifique gateau” (“This Magnificent Cake”), Emma De Swaef & Marc Roels
“La Lotta,” Marco Belocchio
“Las Cruces,” Nicolas Boone
“La nuit des sacs plastiques,” Gabriel Harel
“O orfao,” Carolina Markowicz
“Our Song to War,” Juanita Onzaga
“Skip Day,” Patrick Bresnan & Ivette Lucas
“Le Sujet,” Patrick Bouchard

Related stories from TheWrap:

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Debra Granik, Romain Gavras, Ciro Guerra and Gaspar Noe are among the directors whose films will be included in the 50th Directors’ Fortnight, an independent sidebar that will run concurrently with the Cannes Film Festival in May.

Granik will go to Cannes with “Leave No Trace,” her first narrative film since the Oscar-nominated “Winter’s Bone” in 2010, and a film that received strong reviews when it premiered at Sundance in January.

Gavras, best known for his videos for M.I.A., Kanye West and Jay-Z and others, will be there with “Le monde est a toi,” while Guerra and his co-director Cristina Gallego, who made the Oscar-nominated “Embrace of the Serpent,” will bring “Birds of Passage” to Directors’ Fortnight.

The Argentinian provocateur Noe will bring “Climax” to the festival.

Also in the selection: Panos Cosmatos’ horror film “Mandy,” which features what is reportedly another wild performance from Nicolas Cage.

Directors’ Fortnight (Quinzaine des Realisateurs) was established in 1969, in the aftermath of a 1968 Cannes Film Festival that was cancelled midway through in solidarity with the protests sweeping through France. It was set up to offer a more daring and experimental slate than the main festival, and over the years provided the first Cannes exposure for such directors as Martin Scorsese, Werner Herzog, Michael Haneke and Spike Lee.

Directors’ Fortnight will open on May 9 and run through May 19.

The lineup:

“Pajaros de verano” (“Birds of Passage”), Ciro Guerra and Cristina Gallego (opening film)
“Amin,” Philippe Faucon
“Carmen Y Lola,” Arantxa Echevarria
“Climax,” Gaspar Noe
“Comprama un revolver,” Julio Hernandez Cordon
“Les Confins du Monde,” Guillaume Nicloux
“El motoarrebatador,” Augustin Toscano
“En Liberte,” Pierre Salvador
“Joueurs,” Marie Monge
“Leave No Trace,” Debra Granik
“Los Silencios,” Beatriz Seigner
“Ming wang xing shi ke,” Ming Zhang
“Mandy,” Panos Cosmatos
“Mirai,” Mamoru Hosoda
“Le monde est a toi,” Romain Gavras
“Petra,” Jaime Rosales
“Samouni Road,” Stefano Savona
“Teret,” Ognjen Glavonic
“Weldi,” Mohamed Ben Attia
“Troppa Grazia,” Gianni Zanasi (closing film)

Short films:
“Basses,” Felix Imbert
“Ce Magnifique gateau” (“This Magnificent Cake”), Emma De Swaef & Marc Roels
“La Lotta,” Marco Belocchio
“Las Cruces,” Nicolas Boone
“La nuit des sacs plastiques,” Gabriel Harel
“O orfao,” Carolina Markowicz
“Our Song to War,” Juanita Onzaga
“Skip Day,” Patrick Bresnan & Ivette Lucas
“Le Sujet,” Patrick Bouchard

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Will Welcome Back Lars von Trier, Says Festival Director

Majority of Cannes Critics' Week Competition Films Were Directed by Women

Netflix Bails on Cannes Over Theatrical Release Mandate

Cannes Will Welcome Back Lars von Trier, Says Festival Director

Director Lars von Trier, who was declared “persona non grata” at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival for comments he made about Adolph Hitler, will return to Cannes for the first time since then, festival general delegate Thierry Fremaux said on French radio on Tuesday.

Von Trier’s “The House That Jack Built,” the study of a serial killer played by Matt Dillon, has long been rumored to be a contender for a slot at this year’s festival. When asked about that by a French radio host, Fremaux confirmed that Cannes would have a von Trier announcement in the coming days.

When the host pressed him to confirm that the film had been added to the lineup, Fremaux responded, “I sort of did.”

Also Read: Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

“The House That Jack Built” is set in Washington State and covers the life of the killer over a dozen years. Other cast members include Riley Keough, Bruno Ganz and Uma Thurman. IFC acquired U.S. rights to the film in Cannes last May.

Known as a cinematic provocateur, the Danish director caused a furor at Cannes in 2011 when his film “Melancholia” screened in the main competition. Asked at a press conference to discuss his German roots and his interest in the Nazi aesthetic, he began a long and rambling answer by saying, “I thought I was a Jew for a long time, and I was very happy… But it turned out that I was not a Jew…

“And then I found out that I was really a Nazi, because my family was German. Which also gave me some pleasure. What can I say?”

Also Read: Lars von Trier Denies Björk’s Sexual Harassment Claims

As the film’s star, Kirsten Dunst, pleaded with von Trier to stop talking, he added, “I understand Hitler. I think he did some wrong things, absolutely, but I can see him sitting in his bunker at the end. I think I understand the man. He’s not what you call a good guy, but I understand much about him, and I sympathize with him a little bit.”

While von Trier quickly issued a formal apology for the comments, he was banned from the rest of the festival and declared “persona non grata,” though “Melancholia” remained in the official competition. (Dunst won the festival’s best actress award.)

The director’s next film, the two-part 2013 drama “Nymphomaniac,” did not screen in Cannes. But Fremaux has in recent years said that he was open to having von Trier return to the festival, and in Tuesday’s interview he said that festival president Pierre Lescure has been working to lift the director’s “persona non grata” status.

Fremaux also said that Russian director Andrey Zvyagintsev, who was in competition at Cannes last year with “Loveless,” will serve on the jury this year. The rest of the jury, which will be headed by Cate Blanchett, has yet to be announced.

Ben Croll contributed to this report.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Lars Von Trier’s Serial Killer Movie ‘The House That Jack Built’ Lands at IFC Films

‘Nymphomaniac’ Reviews: Is Lars von Triers’ Latest Sexy or Stupid?

Lars von Trier is an Idiot, and Other Lessons We Learned at Cannes

Director Lars von Trier, who was declared “persona non grata” at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival for comments he made about Adolph Hitler, will return to Cannes for the first time since then, festival general delegate Thierry Fremaux said on French radio on Tuesday.

Von Trier’s “The House That Jack Built,” the study of a serial killer played by Matt Dillon, has long been rumored to be a contender for a slot at this year’s festival. When asked about that by a French radio host, Fremaux confirmed that Cannes would have a von Trier announcement in the coming days.

When the host pressed him to confirm that the film had been added to the lineup, Fremaux responded, “I sort of did.”

“The House That Jack Built” is set in Washington State and covers the life of the killer over a dozen years. Other cast members include Riley Keough, Bruno Ganz and Uma Thurman. IFC acquired U.S. rights to the film in Cannes last May.

Known as a cinematic provocateur, the Danish director caused a furor at Cannes in 2011 when his film “Melancholia” screened in the main competition. Asked at a press conference to discuss his German roots and his interest in the Nazi aesthetic, he began a long and rambling answer by saying, “I thought I was a Jew for a long time, and I was very happy… But it turned out that I was not a Jew…

“And then I found out that I was really a Nazi, because my family was German. Which also gave me some pleasure. What can I say?”

As the film’s star, Kirsten Dunst, pleaded with von Trier to stop talking, he added, “I understand Hitler. I think he did some wrong things, absolutely, but I can see him sitting in his bunker at the end. I think I understand the man. He’s not what you call a good guy, but I understand much about him, and I sympathize with him a little bit.”

While von Trier quickly issued a formal apology for the comments, he was banned from the rest of the festival and declared “persona non grata,” though “Melancholia” remained in the official competition. (Dunst won the festival’s best actress award.)

The director’s next film, the two-part 2013 drama “Nymphomaniac,” did not screen in Cannes. But Fremaux has in recent years said that he was open to having von Trier return to the festival, and in Tuesday’s interview he said that festival president Pierre Lescure has been working to lift the director’s “persona non grata” status.

Fremaux also said that Russian director Andrey Zvyagintsev, who was in competition at Cannes last year with “Loveless,” will serve on the jury this year. The rest of the jury, which will be headed by Cate Blanchett, has yet to be announced.

Ben Croll contributed to this report.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Lars Von Trier's Serial Killer Movie 'The House That Jack Built' Lands at IFC Films

'Nymphomaniac' Reviews: Is Lars von Triers' Latest Sexy or Stupid?

Lars von Trier is an Idiot, and Other Lessons We Learned at Cannes

Majority of Cannes Critics’ Week Competition Films Were Directed by Women

In what is believed to be a first, the French Union of Film Critics selected a majority of films by female directors for competition in the International Critics’ Week sidebar at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival.

The seven competition titles in Critics’ Week, announced Monday, will include four directed by women: Agnieszka Smoczynska’s “Fugue” (pictured above),  Anja Kofmel’s “Chris the Swiss,” Rohena Gera’s “Sir” and Sofia Szilagyi’s “One Day.”

They will compete against Benedikt Erlingsson’s “Kona Fer I Strid” (Woman at War”), Camille Vidal-Naquet’s “Sauvage,” and Gabriel Abrantes & Daniel Schmidt’s “Diamantino.”

“Wildlife,” Paul Dano’s adaptation of a Richard Ford novel starring Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal, will open the sidebar in a special screening. The film, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January, is the only American film chosen.

Also Read: Paul Dano’s ‘Wildlife

Guillaume Senez’s “Our Struggles” will also be presented as a special screening, while Alex Katz’s “Guy” will close the section.

Critics’ Week is run independently of the main festival but takes place concurrently. The selection is devoted to first and second films from new directors — and its directorial debuts, including “Wildlife,” are eligible for Cannes’ Camera d’Or for the festival’s best first film.

International Critics’ Week (Semaine de la Critique) is organized by the French Union of Film Critics, which is made up of 244 critics, writers and journalists. The oldest parallel section to the Cannes Film Festival, it began in 1962.

Also Read: Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

The winners will be chosen by a jury headed by Danish director Joachim Trier and also including American actress Chloe Sevigny, Argentinian actor Nahuel Perez Biscayart, festival programmer Eva Sangiori and French journalist Augustin Trapenard.

Critics’ Week also announced 10 short films in competition, three of them by female directors.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Paul Dano’s ‘Wildlife’ to Open Cannes Critics’ Week Sidebar

Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

Netflix Bails on Cannes Over Theatrical Release Mandate

In what is believed to be a first, the French Union of Film Critics selected a majority of films by female directors for competition in the International Critics’ Week sidebar at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival.

The seven competition titles in Critics’ Week, announced Monday, will include four directed by women: Agnieszka Smoczynska’s “Fugue” (pictured above),  Anja Kofmel’s “Chris the Swiss,” Rohena Gera’s “Sir” and Sofia Szilagyi’s “One Day.”

They will compete against Benedikt Erlingsson’s “Kona Fer I Strid” (Woman at War”), Camille Vidal-Naquet’s “Sauvage,” and Gabriel Abrantes & Daniel Schmidt’s “Diamantino.”

“Wildlife,” Paul Dano’s adaptation of a Richard Ford novel starring Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal, will open the sidebar in a special screening. The film, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January, is the only American film chosen.

Guillaume Senez’s “Our Struggles” will also be presented as a special screening, while Alex Katz’s “Guy” will close the section.

Critics’ Week is run independently of the main festival but takes place concurrently. The selection is devoted to first and second films from new directors — and its directorial debuts, including “Wildlife,” are eligible for Cannes’ Camera d’Or for the festival’s best first film.

International Critics’ Week (Semaine de la Critique) is organized by the French Union of Film Critics, which is made up of 244 critics, writers and journalists. The oldest parallel section to the Cannes Film Festival, it began in 1962.

The winners will be chosen by a jury headed by Danish director Joachim Trier and also including American actress Chloe Sevigny, Argentinian actor Nahuel Perez Biscayart, festival programmer Eva Sangiori and French journalist Augustin Trapenard.

Critics’ Week also announced 10 short films in competition, three of them by female directors.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Paul Dano's 'Wildlife' to Open Cannes Critics' Week Sidebar

Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

Netflix Bails on Cannes Over Theatrical Release Mandate

Paul Dano’s ‘Wildlife” Headed to Cannes in Critics’ Week Selection

“Wildlife,” Paul Dano’s adaptation of a Richard Ford novel starring Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal, has been chosen to screen in the International Critics’ Week sidebar at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival.

Critics’ Week is run independently of the main festival but takes place concurrently. The selection is devoted to first and second films from new directors — and its directorial debuts, including “Wildlife,” are eligible for Cannes’ Camera d’Or for the festival’s best first film.

“Wildlife” debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in January, where it won positive reviews and was acquired by IFC Films. The only American film screening in Critics’ Week, it will be presented as a special opening-night screening in the sidebar.

Also Read: ‘Wildlife’ Review: Paul Dano’s Directorial Debut Is an Austere Portrait of a Family in Crisis

 

International Critics’ Week (Semaine de la Critique) is organized by the French Union of Film Critics, which is made up of 244 critics, writers and journalists. The oldest parallel section to the Cannes Film Festival, it began in 1962.

The winners will be chosen by a jury headed by Danish director Joachim Trier and also including American actress Chloe Sevigny, Argentinian actor Nahuel Perez Biscayart, festival programmer Eva Sangiori and French journalist Augustin Trapenard.

Filmmakers who first screened in Cannes as part of Critics’ Week include Bernardo Bertolucci, Ken Loach, Guillermo del Toro, Jacques Audiard and Alejandro G. Inarritu.

The other main sidebar that runs concurrently with the festival, Directors’ Fortnight, will announce its lineup on Tuesday.

This year’s Cannes Film Festival will run from May 8 through May 19.

More to come.

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“Wildlife,” Paul Dano’s adaptation of a Richard Ford novel starring Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal, has been chosen to screen in the International Critics’ Week sidebar at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival.

Critics’ Week is run independently of the main festival but takes place concurrently. The selection is devoted to first and second films from new directors — and its directorial debuts, including “Wildlife,” are eligible for Cannes’ Camera d’Or for the festival’s best first film.

“Wildlife” debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in January, where it won positive reviews and was acquired by IFC Films. The only American film screening in Critics’ Week, it will be presented as a special opening-night screening in the sidebar.

 

International Critics’ Week (Semaine de la Critique) is organized by the French Union of Film Critics, which is made up of 244 critics, writers and journalists. The oldest parallel section to the Cannes Film Festival, it began in 1962.

The winners will be chosen by a jury headed by Danish director Joachim Trier and also including American actress Chloe Sevigny, Argentinian actor Nahuel Perez Biscayart, festival programmer Eva Sangiori and French journalist Augustin Trapenard.

Filmmakers who first screened in Cannes as part of Critics’ Week include Bernardo Bertolucci, Ken Loach, Guillermo del Toro, Jacques Audiard and Alejandro G. Inarritu.

The other main sidebar that runs concurrently with the festival, Directors’ Fortnight, will announce its lineup on Tuesday.

This year’s Cannes Film Festival will run from May 8 through May 19.

More to come.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'You Were Never Really Here' Rides Cannes Praise to Big Indie Box Office Start

'Solo: A Star Wars Story' to Premiere at Cannes Film Festival

Penelope Cruz, Javier Bardem Film 'Everybody Knows' to Open Cannes Film Festival

How Tom Petty Became the Key to HBO’s Elvis Presley Documentary

HBO’s two-part documentary “Elvis Presley: The Searcher” covers lots of ground and talks to lots of people who were close to Elvis. But according to director Thom Zimny and producer Jon Landau, a key to the film came from one of the last people they interviewed: Tom Petty, who sat down to talk about Elvis in March 2017, less than seven months before his unexpected death.

“What Tom did, perhaps more than anybody, was tell the story that we were trying to tell,” said Landau, the longtime manager of Bruce Springsteen, who is also interviewed in “The Searcher.” “Tom started talking about the later part of Elvis’ career, which is typically dealt with dismissively. He said, ‘Yeah, but when you put all the craziness aside, there is still this incredible singer, surrounded by this incredible band.’

“And he chose, as an example, this piece called ‘American Trilogy,’ a very corny but soulful and beautiful trilogy that Elvis used to do. Tom described exactly what it meant to have Elvis transcend the corniness to do something so stirring and so great. Thom [Zimny] and I had been planning to use ‘American Trilogy’ all along, but Tom spontaneously brought it into the discussion on its own.”

Also Read: ‘The King’ Director Eugene Jarecki on How Elvis Is Metaphor for America

Petty, added Zimny, was one of the final interviews that was done for “The Searcher.” “I’ve had no experience like that interview before,” said the director, whose other work includes editing a dozen episodes of “The Wire” and directing several documentaries about Springsteen.

“Tom seemed completely in sync with the film I was talking about for many years with Jon. The ‘American Trilogy’ sequence was an idea between Jon and I: How can we bring the interpretation of his later touring career to a different place? And Tom just went there.”

Petty is only one of many voices in “The Searcher,” a two-part, four-hour chronicle of Elvis’ life and career that premieres on HBO on Saturday. But one of his comments could serve as a mission statement for the film: “[Elvis] had no road map and he forged a path of what to do and what not to do. And we shouldn’t make the mistake of writing off a great artist because of all the clatter that came later. We should dwell in what he did that was so beautiful and everlasting, which was that great, great music.”

The film began when Priscilla Presley, Elvis’ ex-wife and a key figure in the Elvis estate, approached HBO with the idea of a new documentary using rare footage from the archives. HBO went to Landau, who in his younger days as a rock critic wrote one of the first serious appraisals of the ’70s Elvis as a musical and cultural force.

Also Read: How Elvis Presley’s Death Led to the Birth of Modern Entertainment Journalism (Guest Blog)

“My idea was to tell the story from the beginning to the end, good times and bad times,” Landau said. “Elvis’ weaknesses, his bad decisions, the things he had no control over because of the Colonel [his manager, Colonel Tom Parker] — we have to cover all those things, but I don’t want the film to be about those things.

“I ultimately wanted this thing to be about this genius. Because I believe he was a genius from start to finish, even when he was recording the soundtrack to ‘Clambake.’”

Zimny said Landau was an important voice in the making of the film — but so was Priscilla, who provided the film’s title when she commented that Elvis spent his whole life as “a searcher.”

“It almost became a joke when we were in the editing room,” said Landau. “Anytime we got stumped, I would say, ‘Why don’t we add more Priscilla?’ Because everything she said was so empathetic and intelligent.”

Also Read: ‘Elvis & Nixon’ Tribeca Review: Michael Shannon and Kevin Spacey Meet in Dis-Graceland

Like every other interview subject, though, Priscilla is never seen on camera talking about Elvis. All the interviews in “The Searcher” were audio-only, with none of the talking-head footage that is standard in documentaries like this. And while the four hours contain Elvis footage that we’ve seen before, the filmmakers made a conscious effort to find a new approach.

“The idea was not to repeat images of Elvis that we had seen 1000 times,” said Zimny. “And by not cutting to a talking head sitting in a chair, it gives you freedom. It’s daunting at first because you have Tom Petty or Bruce Springsteen or Robbie Robertson talking, and you have to come up with an image. But I loved the idea of finding outtakes or using Super 8 footage that doesn’t feel like it’s from a clip reel. We wanted to keep away from the VH1 language.

“I felt that we had to trust that the audience has an understanding of Elvis’ story, so let’s focus on the beats between the big moments. He wanted to do a gospel song on the Ed Sullivan show? Let’s concentrate on that, not on how he was shot from the waist up.”

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How Elvis Presley’s Death Led to the Birth of Modern Entertainment Journalism (Guest Blog)

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Elvis Presley: The Lonely Birthday Boy

HBO’s two-part documentary “Elvis Presley: The Searcher” covers lots of ground and talks to lots of people who were close to Elvis. But according to director Thom Zimny and producer Jon Landau, a key to the film came from one of the last people they interviewed: Tom Petty, who sat down to talk about Elvis in March 2017, less than seven months before his unexpected death.

“What Tom did, perhaps more than anybody, was tell the story that we were trying to tell,” said Landau, the longtime manager of Bruce Springsteen, who is also interviewed in “The Searcher.” “Tom started talking about the later part of Elvis’ career, which is typically dealt with dismissively. He said, ‘Yeah, but when you put all the craziness aside, there is still this incredible singer, surrounded by this incredible band.’

“And he chose, as an example, this piece called ‘American Trilogy,’ a very corny but soulful and beautiful trilogy that Elvis used to do. Tom described exactly what it meant to have Elvis transcend the corniness to do something so stirring and so great. Thom [Zimny] and I had been planning to use ‘American Trilogy’ all along, but Tom spontaneously brought it into the discussion on its own.”

Petty, added Zimny, was one of the final interviews that was done for “The Searcher.” “I’ve had no experience like that interview before,” said the director, whose other work includes editing a dozen episodes of “The Wire” and directing several documentaries about Springsteen.

“Tom seemed completely in sync with the film I was talking about for many years with Jon. The ‘American Trilogy’ sequence was an idea between Jon and I: How can we bring the interpretation of his later touring career to a different place? And Tom just went there.”

Petty is only one of many voices in “The Searcher,” a two-part, four-hour chronicle of Elvis’ life and career that premieres on HBO on Saturday. But one of his comments could serve as a mission statement for the film: “[Elvis] had no road map and he forged a path of what to do and what not to do. And we shouldn’t make the mistake of writing off a great artist because of all the clatter that came later. We should dwell in what he did that was so beautiful and everlasting, which was that great, great music.”

The film began when Priscilla Presley, Elvis’ ex-wife and a key figure in the Elvis estate, approached HBO with the idea of a new documentary using rare footage from the archives. HBO went to Landau, who in his younger days as a rock critic wrote one of the first serious appraisals of the ’70s Elvis as a musical and cultural force.

“My idea was to tell the story from the beginning to the end, good times and bad times,” Landau said. “Elvis’ weaknesses, his bad decisions, the things he had no control over because of the Colonel [his manager, Colonel Tom Parker] — we have to cover all those things, but I don’t want the film to be about those things.

“I ultimately wanted this thing to be about this genius. Because I believe he was a genius from start to finish, even when he was recording the soundtrack to ‘Clambake.'”

Zimny said Landau was an important voice in the making of the film — but so was Priscilla, who provided the film’s title when she commented that Elvis spent his whole life as “a searcher.”

“It almost became a joke when we were in the editing room,” said Landau. “Anytime we got stumped, I would say, ‘Why don’t we add more Priscilla?’ Because everything she said was so empathetic and intelligent.”

Like every other interview subject, though, Priscilla is never seen on camera talking about Elvis. All the interviews in “The Searcher” were audio-only, with none of the talking-head footage that is standard in documentaries like this. And while the four hours contain Elvis footage that we’ve seen before, the filmmakers made a conscious effort to find a new approach.

“The idea was not to repeat images of Elvis that we had seen 1000 times,” said Zimny. “And by not cutting to a talking head sitting in a chair, it gives you freedom. It’s daunting at first because you have Tom Petty or Bruce Springsteen or Robbie Robertson talking, and you have to come up with an image. But I loved the idea of finding outtakes or using Super 8 footage that doesn’t feel like it’s from a clip reel. We wanted to keep away from the VH1 language.

“I felt that we had to trust that the audience has an understanding of Elvis’ story, so let’s focus on the beats between the big moments. He wanted to do a gospel song on the Ed Sullivan show? Let’s concentrate on that, not on how he was shot from the waist up.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

How Elvis Presley's Death Led to the Birth of Modern Entertainment Journalism (Guest Blog)

Elvis Presley Lands Posthumous Grammy Nomination

Elvis Presley: The Lonely Birthday Boy

Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

The 2018 Cannes Film Festival will include new films from directors Spike Lee, Pawel Pawlikowski, David Robert Mitchell and Jean-Luc Godard, as part of a lineup light on American films and long on international auteurs both young and old.

Lee’s “BlacKKKlansman” and Mitchell’s “Under the Silver Lake” are the only American movies in the 18-film main competition, although Ron Howard’s “Solo: A Star Wars Story” will screen out of competition.

Celebrated international directors in the competition include Pawlikowski, Matteo Garrone, Jia Zhang-Ke and Godard, who is bringing the new “Le Livre d’Image” to the festival more than five decades after he made the 1965 film “Pierrot le Fou,” which graces this year’s Cannes poster (above).

Two of the directors in competition, Iranian Jafar Panahi and Ukrainian Kirill Serebrennikov, are under house arrest in their home countries. Cannes General Delegate Thierry Frémaux said the festival would appeal to those countries to allow the filmmakers to travel to France to present their films.

Also Read: Netflix Bails on Cannes Over Theatrical Release Mandate

Overall, the selection is missing many of the Cannes regulars whose films were rumored to be in the running: Naomi Kawase, Nuri Bilge Ceylan, Mike Leigh, Olivier Assayas, Jacques Audiard and Xavier Dolan, among others. Their films may not have been ready in time, but the selection includes enough first-timers to suggest that the festival was consciously trying to bring fresh blood to the Croisette, and particularly to the main competition.

The selection was announced by Frémaux and festival president Pierre Lescure at a press conference in France on Thursday morning. The films were chosen from what Frémaux said were 1,906 submissions.

The main competition typically contains about 20 films, and Frémaux hinted that additional titles would be added in the coming weeks.

Three of the directors in the main competition are female: Eva Husson, Nadine Labacki and Alice Rohrwacher. Since the festival began in 1946, only about four percent of the directors in the main competition have been women. But since 2000, that percentage has inched up to about nine percent, with a high of four women landing films in the competition (which usually consists of about 20 films) in 2011 and three doing in 2006, 2007, 2009, 2015, 2016 and 2017.

As previously announced, the festival will open with Iranian director Asghar Farhadi’s Spanish-language “Everybody Knows,” starring Javier Bardem and Penelope Cruz, and will include an out-of-competition screening of “Solo: A Star Wars Story” and a 50th-anniversary presentation of Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” hosted by Christopher Nolan.

The festival will not include any movies from Netflix, which opted not to submit any films in the wake of rules banning films from the main competition if they didn’t have a French theatrical release.

Also Read: ‘You Were Never Really Here’ Rides Cannes Praise to Big Indie Box Office Start

Rather than submit films for the festival’s out-of-competition sections, Netflix opted to withdraw all its potential Cannes entries. This affected both possible competition titles like Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” and Jeremy Saulnier’s “Hold the Dark” as well as two likely entries in the out-of-competition Cannes Classics section: the newly completed version of Orson Welles’ final, unfinished film, “The Other Side of the Wind,” and Morgan Neville’s documentary about the completion of that film.

The 2018 Cannes Film Festival will begin on Tuesday, May 8 and run through Saturday, May 19. Cate Blanchett will serve as president of the main competition jury, while Benicio del Toro will head the Un Certain Regard jury.

The official selection:

MAIN COMPETITION
“Everybody Knows,” Asghar Farhadi (opening night)
“En Guerre (At War),” Stephane Brize
“Dogman,” Matteo Garrone
“Le Livre d’Image,” Jean-Luc Godard
“Netemo Sametemo (Asako I & II), Ryusuke Hamaguchi
“Plaire Aimer et Courir Vite (Sorry Angel),” Christophe Honore
“Les Filles du Soleil (Girls of the Sun),” Eva Husson
“Ash Is Purest White,” Jia Zhang-Ke
“Shoplifters,” Kore-Eda Hirokazu
“Capharnaum,” Nadine Labaki
“Buh-Ning (Burning),” Lee Chang-Dong
“BlacKKKlansman,” Spike Lee
“Under the Silver Lake,” David Robert Mitchell
“Three Faces,” Jafar Panahi
“Zimna Wojna (Cold War),” Pawel Pawlikowski
“Lazzaro Felice,” Alice Rohrwacher
“Yomeddine,” A.B. Shawky
“Leto,” Kirill Serebrennikov

OUT OF COMPETITION
“Solo: A Star Wars Story,” Ron Howard
“Le Grand Bain,” Gilles Lelouche

MIDNIGHT SCREENINGS
“Ten Years in Thailand,” Aditya Assarat, Wisit Sasanatieng, Chulayarnon Sriphol and Apichatpong Weerasthakul
“The State Against Mandela and the Others,” Nicolas Champeaux & Gilles Porte
“A Touts Vents (To the Four Winds),” Michel Toesca
“La Traversee,” Romain Goupil
“O Grande Circ Mistico,” Carlo Diegues
“Pope Francis – A Man of His Word,” Wim Wenders
“Les Ames Mortes (Dead Souls),” Wang Bing
“Arctic,” Joe Penna
“Gongjak (The Spy Gone North),” Yoon Jong-Bing

UN CERTAIN REGARD
“Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” Bi Gan
“Les Chatouilles (Little Tickles),” Andrea Bescond & Eric Metayer
“Sofia,” Meyem Benm’Barek
“Grans (Border),” Ali Abbasi
“Guele d’Ange (Angel Face),” Vanessa Filho
“Girl,” Lukas Dhont
“A Genoux les Gars (Sextape),” Antoine Desrosieres
“Manto,” Nandita Das
“Mon Tissu Prefere (My Favorite Fabric),” Gaya Jiji
“Euphoria,” Valeria Golino
“Rafiki (Friend),” Wanuri Kahiu
“Die Stropers (The Harvesters),” Etienne Kallos
“In My Room,” Ulrich Kohler
“El Angel,” Luis Ortega
“The Gentle Indifference of the World,” Adilkhan Yerzhanov

Related stories from TheWrap:

Penelope Cruz, Javier Bardem Film ‘Everybody Knows’ to Open Cannes Film Festival

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The 2018 Cannes Film Festival will include new films from directors Spike Lee, Pawel Pawlikowski, David Robert Mitchell and Jean-Luc Godard, as part of a lineup light on American films and long on international auteurs both young and old.

Lee’s “BlacKKKlansman” and Mitchell’s “Under the Silver Lake” are the only American movies in the 18-film main competition, although Ron Howard’s “Solo: A Star Wars Story” will screen out of competition.

Celebrated international directors in the competition include Pawlikowski, Matteo Garrone, Jia Zhang-Ke and Godard, who is bringing the new “Le Livre d’Image” to the festival more than five decades after he made the 1965 film “Pierrot le Fou,” which graces this year’s Cannes poster (above).

Two of the directors in competition, Iranian Jafar Panahi and Ukrainian Kirill Serebrennikov, are under house arrest in their home countries. Cannes General Delegate Thierry Frémaux said the festival would appeal to those countries to allow the filmmakers to travel to France to present their films.

Overall, the selection is missing many of the Cannes regulars whose films were rumored to be in the running: Naomi Kawase, Nuri Bilge Ceylan, Mike Leigh, Olivier Assayas, Jacques Audiard and Xavier Dolan, among others. Their films may not have been ready in time, but the selection includes enough first-timers to suggest that the festival was consciously trying to bring fresh blood to the Croisette, and particularly to the main competition.

The selection was announced by Frémaux and festival president Pierre Lescure at a press conference in France on Thursday morning. The films were chosen from what Frémaux said were 1,906 submissions.

The main competition typically contains about 20 films, and Frémaux hinted that additional titles would be added in the coming weeks.

Three of the directors in the main competition are female: Eva Husson, Nadine Labacki and Alice Rohrwacher. Since the festival began in 1946, only about four percent of the directors in the main competition have been women. But since 2000, that percentage has inched up to about nine percent, with a high of four women landing films in the competition (which usually consists of about 20 films) in 2011 and three doing in 2006, 2007, 2009, 2015, 2016 and 2017.

As previously announced, the festival will open with Iranian director Asghar Farhadi’s Spanish-language “Everybody Knows,” starring Javier Bardem and Penelope Cruz, and will include an out-of-competition screening of “Solo: A Star Wars Story” and a 50th-anniversary presentation of Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” hosted by Christopher Nolan.

The festival will not include any movies from Netflix, which opted not to submit any films in the wake of rules banning films from the main competition if they didn’t have a French theatrical release.

Rather than submit films for the festival’s out-of-competition sections, Netflix opted to withdraw all its potential Cannes entries. This affected both possible competition titles like Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” and Jeremy Saulnier’s “Hold the Dark” as well as two likely entries in the out-of-competition Cannes Classics section: the newly completed version of Orson Welles’ final, unfinished film, “The Other Side of the Wind,” and Morgan Neville’s documentary about the completion of that film.

The 2018 Cannes Film Festival will begin on Tuesday, May 8 and run through Saturday, May 19. Cate Blanchett will serve as president of the main competition jury, while Benicio del Toro will head the Un Certain Regard jury.

The official selection:

MAIN COMPETITION
“Everybody Knows,” Asghar Farhadi (opening night)
“En Guerre (At War),” Stephane Brize
“Dogman,” Matteo Garrone
“Le Livre d’Image,” Jean-Luc Godard
“Netemo Sametemo (Asako I & II), Ryusuke Hamaguchi
“Plaire Aimer et Courir Vite (Sorry Angel),” Christophe Honore
“Les Filles du Soleil (Girls of the Sun),” Eva Husson
“Ash Is Purest White,” Jia Zhang-Ke
“Shoplifters,” Kore-Eda Hirokazu
“Capharnaum,” Nadine Labaki
“Buh-Ning (Burning),” Lee Chang-Dong
“BlacKKKlansman,” Spike Lee
“Under the Silver Lake,” David Robert Mitchell
“Three Faces,” Jafar Panahi
“Zimna Wojna (Cold War),” Pawel Pawlikowski
“Lazzaro Felice,” Alice Rohrwacher
“Yomeddine,” A.B. Shawky
“Leto,” Kirill Serebrennikov

OUT OF COMPETITION
“Solo: A Star Wars Story,” Ron Howard
“Le Grand Bain,” Gilles Lelouche

MIDNIGHT SCREENINGS
“Ten Years in Thailand,” Aditya Assarat, Wisit Sasanatieng, Chulayarnon Sriphol and Apichatpong Weerasthakul
“The State Against Mandela and the Others,” Nicolas Champeaux & Gilles Porte
“A Touts Vents (To the Four Winds),” Michel Toesca
“La Traversee,” Romain Goupil
“O Grande Circ Mistico,” Carlo Diegues
“Pope Francis – A Man of His Word,” Wim Wenders
“Les Ames Mortes (Dead Souls),” Wang Bing
“Arctic,” Joe Penna
“Gongjak (The Spy Gone North),” Yoon Jong-Bing

UN CERTAIN REGARD
“Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” Bi Gan
“Les Chatouilles (Little Tickles),” Andrea Bescond & Eric Metayer
“Sofia,” Meyem Benm’Barek
“Grans (Border),” Ali Abbasi
“Guele d’Ange (Angel Face),” Vanessa Filho
“Girl,” Lukas Dhont
“A Genoux les Gars (Sextape),” Antoine Desrosieres
“Manto,” Nandita Das
“Mon Tissu Prefere (My Favorite Fabric),” Gaya Jiji
“Euphoria,” Valeria Golino
“Rafiki (Friend),” Wanuri Kahiu
“Die Stropers (The Harvesters),” Etienne Kallos
“In My Room,” Ulrich Kohler
“El Angel,” Luis Ortega
“The Gentle Indifference of the World,” Adilkhan Yerzhanov

Related stories from TheWrap:

Penelope Cruz, Javier Bardem Film 'Everybody Knows' to Open Cannes Film Festival

Quelle Horreur! Cannes Film Festival Bans Selfies on Red Carpet

Cate Blanchett Named Cannes Film Festival Jury President