How This Year’s Oscars Became a Feminist Game Changer (Guest Blog)

Frances McDormand, a week has passed since the Oscars, and I’m still fired up by your speech.

The highlight of attending this year’s ceremony was when you symbolically lowered your much-deserved masculine statue down on the stage, and called on all the nominated women to stand. Your recitation of “inclusion rider” validated a legal concept that needs to be shouted throughout the land.

I was moved to tears and stood up cheering your inspiring gestures from my nosebleed seat at the Dolbe Theatre.

Also Read: The Timely Accessory I’m Wearing to This Year’s Oscars (Guest Blog)

Photo Courtesy of Aviva Kempner

The only thing that would have made me happier if I had been able to give you the gun reform button — “Love Your Children More Than Your Guns” — that I had in tow. My vision was of you wearing this miniature billboard for the world to see. I presented one to Allison Janney while secretly wishing her “West Wing” character was presently working in the White House.

I believe the 2018 Oscars are going to have a lasting influence. The nomination for “Mudbound” cinematographer Rachel Morrison has already challenged me to hire beyond the norm. I employ mostly female staff members and editor, and was now inspired to use a female cinematographer for my L.A. shoot last week. My search was unsuccessful, but I am now committed to hiring a woman DP for future shoots.

Several 2018 nominees have given audiences game changing insights. The most empowering female portraits — Meryl Streep’s female newspaper publisher fighting for the Fourth Estate in “The Post” and McDormand’s grieving mother demanding justice in “Three Billboards” — were most liberating. Thanks Jordan Peele for your “Get Out,” a stirring horror story about race and eye opener to white society. And kudos to Sebastian Lelio for writing and casting Daniela Vega in such a moving trans love story as “A Fantastic Woman.”

Other Hollywood actresses have also led the charge. The expressions of solidarity with the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements at the Golden Globes and the SAG Awards were so encouraging.

Also Read: Michael B Jordan Accepts Frances McDormand’s Invitation, Will Adopt Inclusion Riders

These thespians’ courageous acts inspired me to come to the Oscar ceremony sporting this accessory about our society’s gun issues, because lawmakers in my Washington, D.C., hometown are not calling for reform. Using words expressed by one of the Parkland student survivors, a D.C. school teacher was my designer.

I finally managed to hand McDormand a button two days after the Oscars when she was introducing an amazing new film, “Rider,” directed by the talented Chloe Zhao. At its reception, I observed how the outspoken actress’ words were already reverberating in Hollywood. I overheard a male producer bragging that he was hiring two female directors for future film projects.

I left L.A. singing, “Is this the start of something wonderful and new,” from the Oscar-winning song from last year’s “La La Land,” “City of Stars.” I told my airport Lfyt driver, an actor of African heritage named Lamarana Bah, that this new Hollywood era should be helpful finding roles.

Also Read: Katie Couric Talks Matt Lauer, Sexual Harassment at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast Austin

I swear I stood taller arriving in my Washington on Women’s International Day. And I did not waste any time employing my expanded height. I rushed to proudly attend a private screening of the most enjoyable “A Wrinkle in Time,” directed by Ava Duverney and produced by the tenacity of D.C.-based producer Catherine Hand. It is one of the largest budgeted films ever directed by a woman of color.

I returned late at night to find a newsletter that lauded those contributing to the creation of an embassy statute without mentioning any of the women who had also worked on the art project. I sent off emails criticizing the exclusion, and sure enough those in power agreed to correct the errors.

I feel McDomrand’s message traveling with me as I am working today on a new feminist tale, “Pissed Off,” about how the female senators fought to secure a bathroom for themselves in the Capitol since there had not been women elected to that legislative branch before 1932. Hollywood inspired this story too — the idea came to me listening to a panel last year at The Wrap’s Power Women Breakfast in D.C.

Also Read: 17 Highest-Grossing Movies Directed by Women, From ‘Mamma Mia!’ to ‘Wonder Woman’ (Photos)

I expect that McDormand’s call for action and advancements in 2018 will be reflected at next year’s ceremony. How about a woman hosting the Oscars? Bring back Whoopi!! Expect another nomination for Morrison’s work on “Black Panther,” and numerous nods for diverse and female nominees.

Meanwhile, there is a most pressing matter. To those women in Hollywood who have led the way please join us here in D.C. on March 24 to walk the streets calling for changes in U.S. gun laws. We need your talent and notoriety to demand that legislators finally demonstrate compassion and wisdom to protect our youth.

Frances, we need you here to billboard the message. And if you have misplaced the button I gave you, don’t worry — we are making many more.

Related stories from TheWrap:

The Timely Accessory I’m Wearing to This Year’s Oscars (Guest Blog)

Michael B Jordan Accepts Frances McDormand’s Invitation, Will Adopt Inclusion Riders

Oscars: What Is an ‘Inclusion Rider,’ That Thing Frances McDormand Mentioned in Her Acceptance Speech?

Frances McDormand, a week has passed since the Oscars, and I’m still fired up by your speech.

The highlight of attending this year’s ceremony was when you symbolically lowered your much-deserved masculine statue down on the stage, and called on all the nominated women to stand. Your recitation of “inclusion rider” validated a legal concept that needs to be shouted throughout the land.

I was moved to tears and stood up cheering your inspiring gestures from my nosebleed seat at the Dolbe Theatre.

Photo Courtesy of Aviva Kempner

The only thing that would have made me happier if I had been able to give you the gun reform button — “Love Your Children More Than Your Guns” — that I had in tow. My vision was of you wearing this miniature billboard for the world to see. I presented one to Allison Janney while secretly wishing her “West Wing” character was presently working in the White House.

I believe the 2018 Oscars are going to have a lasting influence. The nomination for “Mudbound” cinematographer Rachel Morrison has already challenged me to hire beyond the norm. I employ mostly female staff members and editor, and was now inspired to use a female cinematographer for my L.A. shoot last week. My search was unsuccessful, but I am now committed to hiring a woman DP for future shoots.

Several 2018 nominees have given audiences game changing insights. The most empowering female portraits — Meryl Streep’s female newspaper publisher fighting for the Fourth Estate in “The Post” and McDormand’s grieving mother demanding justice in “Three Billboards” — were most liberating. Thanks Jordan Peele for your “Get Out,” a stirring horror story about race and eye opener to white society. And kudos to Sebastian Lelio for writing and casting Daniela Vega in such a moving trans love story as “A Fantastic Woman.”

Other Hollywood actresses have also led the charge. The expressions of solidarity with the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements at the Golden Globes and the SAG Awards were so encouraging.

These thespians’ courageous acts inspired me to come to the Oscar ceremony sporting this accessory about our society’s gun issues, because lawmakers in my Washington, D.C., hometown are not calling for reform. Using words expressed by one of the Parkland student survivors, a D.C. school teacher was my designer.

I finally managed to hand McDormand a button two days after the Oscars when she was introducing an amazing new film, “Rider,” directed by the talented Chloe Zhao. At its reception, I observed how the outspoken actress’ words were already reverberating in Hollywood. I overheard a male producer bragging that he was hiring two female directors for future film projects.

I left L.A. singing, “Is this the start of something wonderful and new,” from the Oscar-winning song from last year’s “La La Land,” “City of Stars.” I told my airport Lfyt driver, an actor of African heritage named Lamarana Bah, that this new Hollywood era should be helpful finding roles.

I swear I stood taller arriving in my Washington on Women’s International Day. And I did not waste any time employing my expanded height. I rushed to proudly attend a private screening of the most enjoyable “A Wrinkle in Time,” directed by Ava Duverney and produced by the tenacity of D.C.-based producer Catherine Hand. It is one of the largest budgeted films ever directed by a woman of color.

I returned late at night to find a newsletter that lauded those contributing to the creation of an embassy statute without mentioning any of the women who had also worked on the art project. I sent off emails criticizing the exclusion, and sure enough those in power agreed to correct the errors.

I feel McDomrand’s message traveling with me as I am working today on a new feminist tale, “Pissed Off,” about how the female senators fought to secure a bathroom for themselves in the Capitol since there had not been women elected to that legislative branch before 1932. Hollywood inspired this story too — the idea came to me listening to a panel last year at The Wrap’s Power Women Breakfast in D.C.

I expect that McDormand’s call for action and advancements in 2018 will be reflected at next year’s ceremony. How about a woman hosting the Oscars? Bring back Whoopi!! Expect another nomination for Morrison’s work on “Black Panther,” and numerous nods for diverse and female nominees.

Meanwhile, there is a most pressing matter. To those women in Hollywood who have led the way please join us here in D.C. on March 24 to walk the streets calling for changes in U.S. gun laws. We need your talent and notoriety to demand that legislators finally demonstrate compassion and wisdom to protect our youth.

Frances, we need you here to billboard the message. And if you have misplaced the button I gave you, don’t worry — we are making many more.

Related stories from TheWrap:

The Timely Accessory I'm Wearing to This Year's Oscars (Guest Blog)

Michael B Jordan Accepts Frances McDormand's Invitation, Will Adopt Inclusion Riders

Oscars: What Is an 'Inclusion Rider,' That Thing Frances McDormand Mentioned in Her Acceptance Speech?

The Timely Accessory I’m Wearing to This Year’s Oscars (Guest Blog)

What a thrill to win the lottery for a ticket to attend the 90th annual Oscars ceremony. I am even more excited to be going as a member of the Academy, and pinching myself in disbelief.

I had attended years ago as the grateful guest of my dear cousin, director Arthur Hiller. Back then I went through all the mishegoss worrying about what to wear and how to get my hair done in an elegant style. (Not that anyone is going to care about what a middle-aged, out-of-town documentary filmmaker was wearing that evening or any time for that matter.)

This year I have a much different concern even though the first questions all my friends asked was, “What dress and jewelry are you going to wear to the ceremony?” Without missing a beat, I answered that this year no designer dress, even if I could afford one or fit into its narrow dimensions, was going to represent the look I wanted to achieve in 2018.

Also Read: All the Oscar-Nominated Movies You Can Watch at Home Right Now

As a citizen of Washington, D.C. — whose population is unfairly denied any voting representation in Congress — I only wanted to wear an accessory that reflected the courageous responses of the young adults who survived the Parkland, Fla., shooting and the parents who tragically lost their teenage children.

So, I don’t care that I selected a previously worn, long red Indian caftan that I just grabbed from my closet. The only thing I am concerned about is what button I am wearing.

I was lucky enough to discuss this dilemma on Sunday with a teacher I knew sitting next to me at a reception for the unveiling of a statue of Orlando Letelier, the former Chilean ambassador to the U.S., who was violently killed by a bomb planted in the car he was driving on the street of Washington, D.C., in 1976. His co- worker Ronni Karpen Moffitt also died in this insidious attack planned by the Chilean military government.

Also Read: Oscars: What Movie Won Best Picture at the Most and Least-Watched Academy Awards?

Without missing a beat and in the spirit of a dedicated teacher, she volunteered to help me create my fashion statement. And I mean literally make my accessory.

She came over to my house and inspired by words spoken by one of the Parkland survivors a button design was born. Sitting in my backyard this educator produced a couple dozen buttons for me and friends to wear and pass out at the ceremony.

I have always thought that teachers are so grossly underpaid and taken for granted for all they do in our society. And this educator, who prefers to remain anonymous, is a gracious phantom thread to my Oscar costume.

Also Read: Here’s Every Best Costume Design Winner in Oscar History (Video)

So thanks to this preschool teacher, armed only with her creativity and crayons, and with no desire to ever arm herself with a gun in the classroom, I possess the grandest of fashion statements for the Oscars, in honor of educator Scott Beigel and coach Aaron Feis, who lost their lives protecting students.

As a Washingtonian who is most upset that Congress time and time again has not passed stricter gun control measures to allow our children to go to school in a safe environment, this is what I am going to wear on Sunday.

Photo by Aviva Kempner

Related stories from TheWrap:

Every Black Director Nominated for an Oscar, From John Singleton to Jordan Peele (Photos)

Every Female Director Nominated for an Oscar, From Lina Wertmuller to Greta Gerwig (Photos)

Oscars Will Acknowledge Time’s Up Movement With Official ‘Moment’ on Sunday

All the Oscar-Nominated Movies You Can Watch at Home Right Now

What a thrill to win the lottery for a ticket to attend the 90th annual Oscars ceremony. I am even more excited to be going as a member of the Academy, and pinching myself in disbelief.

I had attended years ago as the grateful guest of my dear cousin, director Arthur Hiller. Back then I went through all the mishegoss worrying about what to wear and how to get my hair done in an elegant style. (Not that anyone is going to care about what a middle-aged, out-of-town documentary filmmaker was wearing that evening or any time for that matter.)

This year I have a much different concern even though the first questions all my friends asked was, “What dress and jewelry are you going to wear to the ceremony?” Without missing a beat, I answered that this year no designer dress, even if I could afford one or fit into its narrow dimensions, was going to represent the look I wanted to achieve in 2018.

As a citizen of Washington, D.C. — whose population is unfairly denied any voting representation in Congress — I only wanted to wear an accessory that reflected the courageous responses of the young adults who survived the Parkland, Fla., shooting and the parents who tragically lost their teenage children.

So, I don’t care that I selected a previously worn, long red Indian caftan that I just grabbed from my closet. The only thing I am concerned about is what button I am wearing.

I was lucky enough to discuss this dilemma on Sunday with a teacher I knew sitting next to me at a reception for the unveiling of a statue of Orlando Letelier, the former Chilean ambassador to the U.S., who was violently killed by a bomb planted in the car he was driving on the street of Washington, D.C., in 1976. His co- worker Ronni Karpen Moffitt also died in this insidious attack planned by the Chilean military government.

Without missing a beat and in the spirit of a dedicated teacher, she volunteered to help me create my fashion statement. And I mean literally make my accessory.

She came over to my house and inspired by words spoken by one of the Parkland survivors a button design was born. Sitting in my backyard this educator produced a couple dozen buttons for me and friends to wear and pass out at the ceremony.

I have always thought that teachers are so grossly underpaid and taken for granted for all they do in our society. And this educator, who prefers to remain anonymous, is a gracious phantom thread to my Oscar costume.

So thanks to this preschool teacher, armed only with her creativity and crayons, and with no desire to ever arm herself with a gun in the classroom, I possess the grandest of fashion statements for the Oscars, in honor of educator Scott Beigel and coach Aaron Feis, who lost their lives protecting students.

As a Washingtonian who is most upset that Congress time and time again has not passed stricter gun control measures to allow our children to go to school in a safe environment, this is what I am going to wear on Sunday.

Photo by Aviva Kempner

Related stories from TheWrap:

Every Black Director Nominated for an Oscar, From John Singleton to Jordan Peele (Photos)

Every Female Director Nominated for an Oscar, From Lina Wertmuller to Greta Gerwig (Photos)

Oscars Will Acknowledge Time's Up Movement With Official 'Moment' on Sunday

All the Oscar-Nominated Movies You Can Watch at Home Right Now

Baseball on Yom Kippur: The Annual Jewish Challenge (Guest Blog)

As the Washington Nationals attempt to clinch their baseball playoff series against the Los Angeles Dodgers today, another drama is being played out among the owners and fans. The challenge is the annual fall dilemma for those of the Jewish persuasion, deciding whether to observe our holiest day of Yom Kippur or whether to watch or attend a baseball game featuring our favorite team.

One only has to look up the lore about two Jewish baseball players who faced the choice of religion versus being a key to their team’s winning. In 1934, young home run slugger Hank Greenberg (pictured), who grew up in an Orthodox Jewish home in New York City, chose to go to the synagogue instead of the stadium on Yom Kippur during a pennant race. When he entered, the whole congregation stood up in support of his decision. Even though the Detroit Tigers needed his power and lost that day, Greenberg decided to honor his parents, and the city embraced his decision.

Edgar Guest wrote a poem in the Detroit Free Press: “We shall miss him on the infield and shall miss him at the bat / But he’s true to his religion — and I honor him for that!’”

Also Read: Hollywood Stars and Sports Figures Bid a Sad Farewell to Big Papi

Greenberg’s action was even more significant because it occurred in the city that was a hotbed of domestic anti-Semitism. This hall of famer’s story has been the standard for Jewish baseball players and fans for over 80 years.

Children of Jewish families growing up in Detroit annually heard about how Hank Greenberg did not play on Yom Kippur. Our father would tell my brother and me the story religiously on the holiest day to the point that we figured Hank Greenberg was part of Kol Nidre services. (No wonder I spent 13 years making sure a film on Greenberg came to the screen. )

The other famous story of a Jewish baseball player not playing on Yom Kippur, of course, belongs to the Dodgers’ hall of fame pitcher Sandy Koufax, who took a similar stand 31 years after Greenberg did. In 1965, Koufax was scheduled to pitch on Yom Kippur during the World Series, and he also declined his rotation position for religious reasons. This was after the Dodgers relocated from Brooklyn, and Koufax became even more popular among Jewish fans for his decision. Although as a pitcher Koufax could play another day, he is also mentioned with Greenberg as the two major stars who have confronted this dilemma.

Also Read: Goodbye, Vin Scully: In a Format Designed for Play by Play, He Found Poetry

As today’s game at Dodger Stadium continues into the evening, Jewish fans will be speculating if Joc Pederson, whose mother is Jewish, will be playing or not. There are no Jewish players on the Nationals.

There are, however, Jewish owners who I would predict are struggling whether to attend or spend the whole game at the stadium. Two of the Dodgers owners, Stan Kasten and Peter Guber, are Jewish. Maybe Katsen is conferring with Koufax today, since the hall of fame pitcher remains affiliated with the Dodgers.

The newer and exiting Washington Nationals are owned by developer Ted Lerner, who grew up selling magazines to raise funds for bleacher seats to watch the Senators play at Griffith Stadium in D.C. Lerner, who usually does not attend games on Friday nights during the regular season, probably will not be at the stadium today. But we will be praying for him to go on and get a World Series ring at age 91.

Also Read: 20 of Vin Scully’s Funniest, Most Memorable Baseball Calls (Videos)

Then, tonight, as Yom Kippur begins, the San Francisco Giants and Chicago Cubs will face off. If retired baseball player Al Rosen, who was GM of the Giants from 1985 until 1992 and died in 2015, were alive today, I’m sure he would have some good advice for Theo Epstein, the Cubs’ amazing general manager, who previously turned around that other long-lamented squad, the Boston Red Sox.

Years ago, Rosen was the general manager of the Yankees and chose to attend the game on Yom Kippur. An angry fan wrote him a letter, saying that he saw Rosen on television at the stadium and criticized the Jewish GM for being there. Rosen told me that he angrily wrote back a letter to the judgmental fan: “Why were you watching television on Yom Kippur?”

Anyway, I’m not sure what Epstein will decide to do, but I admire the man for his baseball knowledge and ability to build up teams for locals who suffer from not winning. Besides, who cannot love a man whose grandfather and great-uncle wrote my all-time favorite movie, “Casablanca.” To paraphrase his relatives, “You will always have Boston if your Cubs lose, Theo!”

Also Read: ‘Pitch’ Review: Kylie Bunbury on Deck for Stardom in Baseball Drama

Just like my baseball-fan forefathers and foremothers, I have been racking my brain: what to do about attending services or going to a game as the playoffs were about to begin. Luckily for me, the synagogue that I attend has two services. I will be watching the showdown at 5 p.m. ET and attend later Kol Nidre services at Temple Sinai at 9 p.m.

Hopefully, this match will not go five hours like last night’s game between the San Francisco Giants and the Chicago Cubs and create a conflict for me. No doubt, Jewish fans in both of those cities are racking their brains in this annual Jewish challenge: baseball versus their religion. In the old days, transistors used to be hidden in the tallis (prayer shawl) bags for easy listening to the baseball scores outside the synagogues. Recording the games or checking one’s pocket iPhones are our modern day answer for following the games on the holiday.

This Yom Kippur quandary has also affected the highest court of the land. When I filmed Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, she explained that Greenberg’s “conscience” not to play in 1934 impacted on the court’s decision not to hold oral arguments on Yom Kippur. The court decided to spare Jewish lawyers this annual potential conflict.

Also Read: Tim Tebow Will Attempt to Play Professional Baseball

Wouldn’t it be grand if Major League Baseball could be inspired by the highest court of the land? As Rob Manfred has been such an outstanding Commissioner of Baseball, maybe he could be a mensch and cancel playing baseball on Yom Kippur in the future, thus wiping out this decades old conflict. We would all be so grateful. And I am sure all the players would welcome the 24-hour rest.

Aviva Kempner made “The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg” and is now filming a feature documentary on spy catcher Moe Berg. A DVD of her latest film, “Rosenwald,” with an additional disc of over three hours of extra material will be out in February.

As the Washington Nationals attempt to clinch their baseball playoff series against the Los Angeles Dodgers today, another drama is being played out among the owners and fans. The challenge is the annual fall dilemma for those of the Jewish persuasion, deciding whether to observe our holiest day of Yom Kippur or whether to watch or attend a baseball game featuring our favorite team.

One only has to look up the lore about two Jewish baseball players who faced the choice of religion versus being a key to their team’s winning. In 1934, young home run slugger Hank Greenberg (pictured), who grew up in an Orthodox Jewish home in New York City, chose to go to the synagogue instead of the stadium on Yom Kippur during a pennant race. When he entered, the whole congregation stood up in support of his decision. Even though the Detroit Tigers needed his power and lost that day, Greenberg decided to honor his parents, and the city embraced his decision.

Edgar Guest wrote a poem in the Detroit Free Press: “We shall miss him on the infield and shall miss him at the bat / But he’s true to his religion — and I honor him for that!'”

Greenberg’s action was even more significant because it occurred in the city that was a hotbed of domestic anti-Semitism. This hall of famer’s story has been the standard for Jewish baseball players and fans for over 80 years.

Children of Jewish families growing up in Detroit annually heard about how Hank Greenberg did not play on Yom Kippur. Our father would tell my brother and me the story religiously on the holiest day to the point that we figured Hank Greenberg was part of Kol Nidre services. (No wonder I spent 13 years making sure a film on Greenberg came to the screen. )

The other famous story of a Jewish baseball player not playing on Yom Kippur, of course, belongs to the Dodgers’ hall of fame pitcher Sandy Koufax, who took a similar stand 31 years after Greenberg did. In 1965, Koufax was scheduled to pitch on Yom Kippur during the World Series, and he also declined his rotation position for religious reasons. This was after the Dodgers relocated from Brooklyn, and Koufax became even more popular among Jewish fans for his decision. Although as a pitcher Koufax could play another day, he is also mentioned with Greenberg as the two major stars who have confronted this dilemma.

As today’s game at Dodger Stadium continues into the evening, Jewish fans will be speculating if Joc Pederson, whose mother is Jewish, will be playing or not. There are no Jewish players on the Nationals.

There are, however, Jewish owners who I would predict are struggling whether to attend or spend the whole game at the stadium. Two of the Dodgers owners, Stan Kasten and Peter Guber, are Jewish. Maybe Katsen is conferring with Koufax today, since the hall of fame pitcher remains affiliated with the Dodgers.

The newer and exiting Washington Nationals are owned by developer Ted Lerner, who grew up selling magazines to raise funds for bleacher seats to watch the Senators play at Griffith Stadium in D.C. Lerner, who usually does not attend games on Friday nights during the regular season, probably will not be at the stadium today. But we will be praying for him to go on and get a World Series ring at age 91.

Then, tonight, as Yom Kippur begins, the San Francisco Giants and Chicago Cubs will face off. If retired baseball player Al Rosen, who was GM of the Giants from 1985 until 1992 and died in 2015, were alive today, I’m sure he would have some good advice for Theo Epstein, the Cubs’ amazing general manager, who previously turned around that other long-lamented squad, the Boston Red Sox.

Years ago, Rosen was the general manager of the Yankees and chose to attend the game on Yom Kippur. An angry fan wrote him a letter, saying that he saw Rosen on television at the stadium and criticized the Jewish GM for being there. Rosen told me that he angrily wrote back a letter to the judgmental fan: “Why were you watching television on Yom Kippur?”

Anyway, I’m not sure what Epstein will decide to do, but I admire the man for his baseball knowledge and ability to build up teams for locals who suffer from not winning. Besides, who cannot love a man whose grandfather and great-uncle wrote my all-time favorite movie, “Casablanca.” To paraphrase his relatives, “You will always have Boston if your Cubs lose, Theo!”

Just like my baseball-fan forefathers and foremothers, I have been racking my brain: what to do about attending services or going to a game as the playoffs were about to begin. Luckily for me, the synagogue that I attend has two services. I will be watching the showdown at 5 p.m. ET and attend later Kol Nidre services at Temple Sinai at 9 p.m.

Hopefully, this match will not go five hours like last night’s game between the San Francisco Giants and the Chicago Cubs and create a conflict for me. No doubt, Jewish fans in both of those cities are racking their brains in this annual Jewish challenge: baseball versus their religion. In the old days, transistors used to be hidden in the tallis (prayer shawl) bags for easy listening to the baseball scores outside the synagogues. Recording the games or checking one’s pocket iPhones are our modern day answer for following the games on the holiday.

This Yom Kippur quandary has also affected the highest court of the land. When I filmed Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, she explained that Greenberg’s “conscience” not to play in 1934 impacted on the court’s decision not to hold oral arguments on Yom Kippur. The court decided to spare Jewish lawyers this annual potential conflict.

Wouldn’t it be grand if Major League Baseball could be inspired by the highest court of the land? As Rob Manfred has been such an outstanding Commissioner of Baseball, maybe he could be a mensch and cancel playing baseball on Yom Kippur in the future, thus wiping out this decades old conflict. We would all be so grateful. And I am sure all the players would welcome the 24-hour rest.

Aviva Kempner made “The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg” and is now filming a feature documentary on spy catcher Moe Berg. A DVD of her latest film, “Rosenwald,” with an additional disc of over three hours of extra material will be out in February.