Panic in Hawaii: Residents Wake Up to Ballistic Missile Emergency Alert Sent by Mistake

UPDATE 1/13/2017 11:52 a.m. PT: Hawaii Gov. David Ige told CNN that someone “pushed the wrong button” during an employee shift change, sending out the false alert about an incoming ballistic missile.

Hawaii residents got a jolt this morning as they woke up to frightening mobile push alerts warning island residents of an incoming missile and instructing people to seek shelter.

Hawaii’s Emergency Management Agency then quickly announced that the message was a mistake.

“BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII,” the message read. “SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”

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Confused residents tweeted screenshots of the warnings shortly after 8 a.m. local time.

Hawaii is considered particularly vulnerable these days because it’s on the flight path between the U.S. mainland and North Korea, which has been conducting intercontinental ballistic missile tests by Kim Jong-un.

The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency tweeted its correction 12 minutes after the alert was issued to say it was a false alarm.

NO missile threat to Hawaii.

— Hawaii EMA (@Hawaii_EMA) January 13, 2018

Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) also tried to calm their constituents in the message, calling it a “false alarm.”

HAWAII – THIS IS A FALSE ALARM. THERE IS NO INCOMING MISSILE TO HAWAII. I HAVE CONFIRMED WITH OFFICIALS THERE IS NO INCOMING MISSILE. pic.twitter.com/DxfTXIDOQs

— Tulsi Gabbard (@TulsiGabbard) January 13, 2018

The ballistic missile warning that was issued is a FALSE alarm. Repeat FALSE alarm.

— Mayor Kirk Caldwell (@MayorKirkHNL) January 13, 2018

Hawaii News Now reported that the alert “sent people scrambling for shelters and their cars, and online for additional news.”

The sited also said that cell phones were overloaded while the Hawaii Emergency Management’s website appeared to crash. As of 8:50 a.m., the website had not yet been restored online.

Story developing…

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UPDATE 1/13/2017 11:52 a.m. PT: Hawaii Gov. David Ige told CNN that someone “pushed the wrong button” during an employee shift change, sending out the false alert about an incoming ballistic missile.

Hawaii residents got a jolt this morning as they woke up to frightening mobile push alerts warning island residents of an incoming missile and instructing people to seek shelter.

Hawaii’s Emergency Management Agency then quickly announced that the message was a mistake.

“BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII,” the message read. “SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”

Confused residents tweeted screenshots of the warnings shortly after 8 a.m. local time.

Hawaii is considered particularly vulnerable these days because it’s on the flight path between the U.S. mainland and North Korea, which has been conducting intercontinental ballistic missile tests by Kim Jong-un.

The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency tweeted its correction 12 minutes after the alert was issued to say it was a false alarm.

Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) also tried to calm their constituents in the message, calling it a “false alarm.”

Hawaii News Now reported that the alert “sent people scrambling for shelters and their cars, and online for additional news.”

The sited also said that cell phones were overloaded while the Hawaii Emergency Management’s website appeared to crash. As of 8:50 a.m., the website had not yet been restored online.

Story developing…

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Hawaii Five-0' Boss Is 'Shocked' That Cast Exits Led to Criticism of Show's Diversity

Daniel Dae Kim Says 'Hawaii Five-0' Exit Was a Matter of 'Self-Worth'

'Hawaii Five-0': CBS Execs Maintain They Offered Daniel Dae Kim, Grace Park 'a Lot of Money' to Stay