‘Good Girls Revolt’ Dropped by Amazon; Studio Will Shop the Show Elsewhere

READ ON: IndieWire

Amazon won’t bring back “Good Girls Revolt” for a second season.

The series, which premiered in October, garnered strong reviews and appeared to attract a decent audience vs. other Amazon series, according to data from Symphony. But according to insiders, Amazon Studios head Roy Price was not a fan of “Good Girls Revolt” (and didn’t see it as an awards contender), and decided that the show’s first season would be its last.

READ MORE: “Good Girls Revolt” Spotlights the Real-Life Women Who Fought for Newsroom Equality

“Good Girls Revolt” is produced by Sony Pictures TV, which is believed to be looking to find a new home for the show. Insiders noted the timeliness of the series, given that women’s rights played a major role in the recent presidential election.

Set in 1969, “Good Girls Revolt” and centers on a group of women looking to be treated fairly as employees at the newsmagazine “News of the Week.” The show is based on Lynn Povich’s book “The Good Girls Revolt,” which looked at real-life sexual discrimination cases filed by female employees at Newsweek.

"Good Girls Revolt."

“Good Girls Revolt”

Amazon Studios

Anna Camp, Genevieve Angelson and Erin Darke play the young female researches who push for a cultural change in the newsroom, assisted by Eleanor Holmes Norton (played by Joy Bryant).

Chris Diamantopoulos (“Silicon Valley”), Hunter Parrish (“Weeds”), Jim Belushi (“Saturday Night Live”), Joy Bryant (“Parenthood”) and Grace Gummer (“The Newsroom”) also star. “Good Girls Revolt” is written by Dana Calvo, directed by Liza Johnson, and executive produced by Calvo, Lynda Obst (“Interstellar”), Darlene Hunt (“The Big C”), Don Kurt (“Justified”) and Jeff Okin (“Dark Skies”).

READ MORE: ‘Good Girls Revolt’ Review: Don’t Expect a Revolution in Season 1, But a Powerful Story Does Emerge

In her review of the series, IndieWire’s Liz Shannon Miller said it lacked subtlety, but that “it’s in service to an issue that doesn’t get nearly enough attention: The idea that support positions, especially tasks that for years have been deemed ‘women’s work,’ get so easily taken for granted.”

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